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new ride

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Tradesman, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Here in SE Idaho, I saw a college student the other day in 20 degree temps, wearing shorts, while brushing the snow off his car, and that is not too unusual.
     
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  2. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    This is happening about eight miles from me, I know the land owner, he said the wind tower is not producing the way it should, so they are adding three small blades between the existing. I haven’t talked to him for awhile but since around Christmas this is the third crane to be set up and to date there hasn’t been anything done. If anything happens I’ll update.
    FC88B73D-F257-4C9A-B83C-442D47E27071.jpeg 841DBF5F-6415-497E-B697-F47150055E4F.jpeg
    This is the building my crew is working on, it is the one that I used the 90 ton grove on.
    90F335F0-444D-4A1D-A286-7718AFCEDCC9.jpeg
     
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  3. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    the rear wall of the building above.
    A7AE7A33-4B19-4BB1-B097-F20B9010B699.jpeg 26 gage corrugated steel installed horizontally, it’s for an architect. This is the first time we’ve done this.
     
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  4. petepilot

    petepilot Senior Member

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    well just damn` I like the looks of that
     
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  5. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Is a bit weird to me after decades of corrugated barn tin set vertically. Are shed companies here use steel tube framing set the corrugations 'Wrong' but seems to be OK. Only a arketech would think of going that way. Had thought of asking why the girts were vertical earlier!!
     
  6. terex herder

    terex herder Senior Member

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    If you get mice with the sheets horizontal, they have free reign of the entire building. Put the sheets vertical and they are limited to each individual cavity.
     
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  7. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    Not really maybe less so then the steel vertically. On a conventional building the strapping is horizontal 1x4 or 2x4 allowing mice to travel the perimeter of the building horizontally or vertically through the 7/8”x1 1/2” profile of the steel. The cross section of this building is 2x6 studs @ 16”, 1/2” spruce plywood, tyvek air barrier with all joints taped,2” ridged roxal insulation, strapped vertically @ 16” oc. All windows flashed through with steel trim to the interior of the tyvek and blue skinned, then 26 gage horizontal corrugated cladding with all edges getting lapping trims. Not our first rodeo!
     
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  8. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    Oh my the details but the final product is worth it.
    EE361BB0-72E2-46C9-AEFC-623658EAEA1D.jpeg D524761D-61AA-4086-873B-862ADFA66770.jpeg
     
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  9. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I did these beams and the trusses on the house below. Best thing was it was for two different contractors, so two charges and out by noon. Over the last year I set the trusses on all the houses in the picture and quite a few not in the shot.
    4E98C2C3-9B56-4B2E-95F2-652AEE426FF9.jpeg
     
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  10. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I’ve started helping erect silos, the crew puts the bottom 40 ft.up with their deric and then I come in and hoist the staves up to them a skid at a time.
    C02C9A67-58A3-4A88-A91C-072257E9B786.jpeg BD74740C-5579-48C3-8FA3-EDCF62BC2BDD.jpeg
     
  11. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Silo's are interesting either bolted metal or precast. They must have to have a very solid, very level foundation so they aren't the leaning tower of disaster. Things like vessels are 1 piece and everything is level and square in the fabrication. I think shims and bolting sequence are used also to to keep them exact.
     
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  12. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Cannot believe anyone still constructing them
    Around here most are either in deconstruct or have become landmark points for directions while unused for decades
     
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  13. f311fr1

    f311fr1 Senior Member

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    I bet in Canada they grow grain for food and not a fuel additive.
     
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  14. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Here they have gone to Trench Silage storage and eliminated Silo Storage. Chop corn Whole not just grain store.
     
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  15. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I’m in cattle country so very little if any ethanol corn. I don’t know any beef guys that still use upright silos other than the Mennonites, they use them because they don’t use tractors, so most have a tmr mixer in their silo room and feed with carts. some of the smaller dairy guys use uprights for high moisture and silage because their usage isn’t high enough to keep the face of the feed from spoiling.
    Our corn likely comes off in a four way split, silage, shell corn, high moisture and cob meal.
     
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  16. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    It’s pretty interesting watching them, the top of every second stave is checked with a 12” level then if not perfect a washer us used to level it. I have also seen them measure from one silo to another.
     
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  17. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    DBBB07F4-CB45-47F2-8BE9-361C6D341811.jpeg F758AE24-8420-485E-BDC1-BEC4A41B2FAB.jpeg
    a little before and after
     
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  18. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    What do you guys use for every day use wire rope slings? I have been using 3/8 x 6x19 chockers just because that's what I get when I order them, but recently I pulled out the 7/16 x 6x26 chokers that came with the manitex to tie down the ball for transport. My old slings almost immediately start to Kink with even light use, but the 6x26 that I've been using for months now have no significant kinks. My question is it more the composition of the wire rope or is it the manufacturer.
     
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  19. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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  20. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    TM we use 3/8" eye/eye slings 6' long for concrete pipe. We don't need alot of capacity the 3/8" 6' is rated for 1.4 ton on a straight pick.

    The wire slings are wear items to us as the concrete is abrasive on the loop and the lifting bar inside the pipe spreads the strands out over time. I get them from a local construction supply house delivered to the job for $28 last time we ordered one.

    So were you on site when the lumber driver flipped the Moffitt or did they bring you in to put it back on the right side?
     
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