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new ride

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Tradesman, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I got the call. On the construction of our business we are customers of theirs.
     
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  2. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    I have long used 3/8" wire rope slings, 12'er's, a pair always on board, mostly for truss bundles, sheeted gables, and girder trusses. Yeah they take a bend, (kink denotes a kinda of a different thing) but it's a given, broken strands is what I watch for, one strand sticking up and they are tossed. Having trusted my life for decades as a hang glider and than ultralight pilot (3/32", 7x7) and still as a fixed wing pilot, I maybe have a greater appreciation of the strength and durability of wire rope than most. At the same time I never overload it.

    I once showed up at a steel setting job with a strange (meaning, we hadn't worked together before) crew of union iron workers that wasted no time in letting me that we'd be using THEIR rigging, and they pulled out this kinked up 3/8" sling that I would have tossed long ago, that they were totally comfortable with. I think I pay $18.00 for a 12', cheap enough to replace BEFORE they look that bad.
     
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  3. JLarson

    JLarson Well-Known Member

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    I hate seeing beat up rigging, it's so cheap in reality. We're always buying new slings and what not like I rarely walk out of our one supply house without at least one or two even if it's just a replacement for one on my service rig.

    Then we get to make fun of other trades and mechanics using some beat ass rigging too lol. Not worth dropping some expensive part or having an incident over a few bucks in slings.
     
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  4. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    I had (3) super short 3/8" made for my mini, right at 2' working length and $12.50 each :)
    Not worth working with chains and bubblegum.
     
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  5. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Skyking: I just discovered a local industrial supply house I long have used for my rigging needs, has another outlet in a town 30 miles away from me, but one with an airstrip just a mile away. Whereas my local one is clear across town, in an area I rarely go. Plus the othe,r airplane accessible one, (with a loaner beater always available) has a lot more in stock, due to the big phosphate plant nearby.
     
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  6. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    Any excuse for a 'mission' works for me. back when my partner was doing more GA engine rebuilds, we would load the 310 with cylinders, cases, cranks, whatever needed to go where ever.
    There is an engine shop at Troutdale and we knew the UPS was cheaper, but hey, it's a mission!
    http://www.premieraircraft.net/
     
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  7. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I don't use 3/8" very often. They are kind of nice setting smaller I-beams because they will choke down a little tighter. I always carry 1/2" x8' for my everyday use. Some of the carpenters complain, but they don't kink up and get as snaky as 3/8" do, so I find them easier to work with. They are a little more rigid if your trying to slide them through a bundle of trusses or pile of I-beams and will push through easier than a 3/8 will. Plus if I end up going to do a big tree or some quarry work, flipping tanks etc. , the 1/2" can basket to 10,000lbs each, so I don't end up with too small of rigging near as fast.

    It's always the game of how much do you want to haul along with you everywhere, vs. getting places and not having enough rigging.

    I've never had 6x36 for chokers, are they a swaged core wire? I'm wondering if manitex just uses their cut offs from the winch ropes to make up those. What's the tag say for a manufacturer and what's the rating on them?
     
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  8. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    I have a 14'6" (something like that, a custom length I had made up) 1/2" cable onboard, but never used, as it was 1 component for lifting my mini excavator. I'm selling the X, and this thread has made me want to try using it the next time I need to move a stack of trusses.
    For individual truss setting I still like the 3' length of lifting grade chain with a snap hook that attaches to a oval load ring, hanging from a 6' 1" endless sling, then my load hook. The chain doesn't get kinked, the ball stays min. 6' above the carpenters heads, and my winching up and down to unhook is minimized. Assuming they can reach the top chord where I'm rigged to, I just have to come down about 18" or less to let them unhook, and I train them to get the chain on the outside of the truss, so I can immediately swing or boom up with no chance of the chain fouling, a few seconds saved every truss adds up.
     
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  9. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I set the steel columns for a 60x120 building today, when I drove in this is what was happening. I had to sit for awhile and get my strength back the sight of someone compacting a pad for me was overwhelming. :D
    0A738BC2-0855-49CC-8B94-BF0ECB6EBBCA.jpeg
     
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  10. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I got my 6x39x7/16” six foot slings today I’ll be trying them tomorrow on some 60 foot trusses tomorrow.
     
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  11. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I had my biggest day ever last week I left my shop at 5:15 am, set two beams at 6:30 drove 2 hours laid over a propane tank and loaded it, drove 1 1/2 hours and set the trusses on a big house, drove a hour to get home at 7:00 pm I billed out 17 1/2 hours. 3B84F6DD-1D4E-4A8A-A76C-A3FC29C458CC.jpeg
     
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  12. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I had a young iron worker call the kinks and twists a$$-holes, to be fully appreciated you had to hear him say it.
     
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  13. Sberry

    Sberry Senior Member

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    Cary steel.JPG spud shackle.JPG spud choke.JPG Its been a while but I have set 100's of 80 ft wood trusses. I was a super for an outfit I talked in to getting a National 500. I went to the rigging store, got a pile of chokers slings and shackles. 2 heavy chokers I bought we never used, we used some steel and some 3/8 with the hooks, logging crap, I forget what they7 called but i mostly used nylon and we shackle 10 ft together to make as long as we want. I set 2 80 ft at a time, we tried 3 but it wasnt as good, was too complicated and 2 was slick a few ft apart and never unhook them. Go around the chord and pull the line thru the eye and stick a 2x4 thru them. On occasion would tie rope to the 2x4 to pull them out but once we worked with a decent crew we could really fly. Where they got the scheme of stagering the stringers right it was easy. spud choke.JPG
     
  14. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I have a set of 10 ft purple round slings as well.
     
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  15. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    The only issue I see with that method, is the crew better be able to reach to above the top chord to pull the pin. Around here, we usually try to rig to the a wood truss's kingpost, not the top chord, so when winching down the chain I use slides clear down to the bottom chord if needed. more than one way to skin a cat, never seen that method of choking/securing a sling before!
     
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  16. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    There’s a long rope to pull spud wrench out thus releasing the sling. A favourite of iron workers when setting columns.
     
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  17. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Thus a need for high steel hard hats:eek:
     
  18. Sberry

    Sberry Senior Member

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    With bar joists a plate with a hole in it slid between the flanges and a hole for a pin with a tag line to it. For wood trusses a 2x4 is better than a spud.
     
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  19. Sberry

    Sberry Senior Member

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    Deer season. Steven gun.JPG
     
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  20. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    I use shackles often to choke a long strap, like you used the spud wrench. The carpenters usually don't get it at first, and always want me to winch clear down so they can reach my load hook, and I have to yell at them to just undo the shackle, then they get it. Depending on the job, it saves a lot of winching up and down.
     
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