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new ride

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Tradesman, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    That Crane Operator is a nit picker, for sure. He's always drawing circles on photos pointing out the crimes committed.:):p He was a privet eye in his first life.
     
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  2. kenh

    kenh Senior Member

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    Aircraft should have a plume bob hanging in the cockpit, a circle on the floor.
     
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  3. dirty4fun

    dirty4fun Senior Member

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    To make the foundation fit the house what they do here is after I have the hole dug move the house over the hole. Plumb down and pour the basement to fit the house. Little more work but makes sense when possible.


     
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  4. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Have seen that on old farm re-sets before. Takes a bit of Throw the Square Away technology but works out. Great Aunts place was a problem like that, stringlined square when built on Large Rock corner supports and crawl space under, sagged and slipped over time then decided to square it up and set a footer, Grandmother said Grandfather was constantly aggravated in helping to stabilize the old house in the fifties. Then in the sixties tore it down anyway.
     
  5. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    I put in a email to Starrett as I have a fairly old number 87 plumb bob out of my father in law's old tooling, a bit scared of it as feels like has liquid inside it, possibly Mercury?.
     
  6. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Mercury? Probably, safe enough when contained. The old Starrett tools are the best for sure, I have one of their bubble protractors I've used on many aircraft builds and other work. No batteries required!
    A lot, most, of the kit airplane builders I know of, are all using digital this and digital that measuring devices, as they think they are more accurate then a plumb bob or a whiskey level. Bull! And a chalk line, can't forget that, some of the best tools to this day are the oldest.
     
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  7. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    I use a bubble protractor on any job requiring set up for angles, very reliable and fool proof. It's either right on or it isn't.
     
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  8. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    I last used it when I built a flatbed on my truck, while it was parked on a sloped floor, easy enough to set it "level" off a datum point on the truck. One little trick I use when trying to be as ultra precise as possible, like setting the washout in an airplane wing, is to NOT just center the bubble, but crowd one way or the other, so the bubble just touches the line on the side, and then when I do the opposite side I make sure I am holding the protractor the same way of course. Probably not a big enough difference to matter but it makes me feel better, as accurate as possible. What's been fun for me is mixing the old ways with the new ways and tools, like a cheap little Harbor Freight laser level, even a cheap as heck laser still shoots out a straight line!
     
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  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    42A71AAA-1894-40F2-A081-2C6C3C258957.jpeg A22330AD-FAE2-478F-9013-225463CB694A.jpeg This is the jewel
    And confirmed they mercury filled them
     
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  10. Natman

    Natman Senior Member

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    Still as accurate as they day it was made!
     
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  11. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Learn't sumpin off this device. Starrett sent me a Email as to Safe so long as DO NOT OPEN IT, inside cap was seal sweat fit when new. Also the Outer cap has that odd little notch, that is to allow a 'Hold' for a self contained string line to be wound up Under the cap head(String Drum).
     
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  12. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I had to slide this drywalled truss in between the occupied house and the one under construction, there was too much wind to take a 2000# drywalled truss over the roof of the house to the right.
    AF7ED809-8895-40B6-A0F1-AADD09CC6127.jpeg
     
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  13. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I had to hire this fellow to set trusses for me on Monday. We had a 3,000 lb. truss section to place at 85 feet. The 45 ton was busy so the boss showed up with his 90. Likely cost me $100 chatting with him. Lol.
    86187424-65A0-48C5-8A6E-7B2068AC97A2.jpeg
     
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  14. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    Bob Hoover could keep that plumb bob in the circle while doing a barrel roll, so I don't know how handy that would be!
     
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  15. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    I set the beams on this house before Christmas, today I set the trusses. It was a real challenge getting in, there was about 3 miles of single lane ice covered road with steep hills, then a sharp turn in the driveway and what seemed like straight up the lane with two 90 degree turns (I almost got stuck on the second one )
    3014E20A-BFB6-4F72-B2BD-EEF29D8E2A04.jpeg
     
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  16. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Some people build houses out in the boonies and don't think much. Either they build it in amongst a bunch of tree's so it's a real fire hazard or they put in a weird twisting driveway that makes it hard for emergency vehicles to get in if they need to. Imagine it's the middle of winter, there's a foot of snow and their furnace quit or they needed an ambulance. Nobody could get to them. The other stupid thing I've seen is acreage owners with 3 acres and you can't turn around to drive down the driveway. I know a guy who built a great house but his driveway totally sucks. He has a travel trailer and has to back up the driveway to park it or hook up to it. He's got 2 -1/2 acres to make a turn around area.
     
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  17. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    When we built found that rock was relatively inexpensive so laid in wide driveways does twist at bottom but a gooseneck is easy to maneuver thru
    At times still have to get off in grass but not often
     
  18. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    This talk about mercury reminded me somewhere around here is a glass bulb switch with mercury in it. As I recall it was part of an idle control system on a Lincoln welder. Also recall playing with that stuff in science class in high-school. They had a pint bottle of it and it was crazy as to how heavy that bottle was to pick up. Handled that stuff more than once with bar hands.
    "The inhalation of elemental mercury vapours can cause neurological and behavioural disorders, such as tremors, emotional instability, insomnia, memory loss, neuromuscular changes and headaches."

    Some might say that would explain a few things about me!
     
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  19. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Slay Transportation used to haul Mercury for a couple of controls firms in STL. When worked Feld Truck rental we supplied Slay with truck leases, the Mercury Trailer was a bridgework of Structural steel to a MASSIVELY Thick on end cannister with a lid that bolted in place with three seal rings under it. Gawd Awful tanker could haul some 150-250 gallons of the stuff and was near to overweight doing that. Was a full load empty.
     
  20. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    By my off-the-cuff calculation ... 250 gallons of mercury weigh a bit over 28,000 pounds.
    For perspective ... a common IBC (liquid tote) is 275 gallons..

    Dmiller's flask was likely designed to hold up to a minor wreck. Would be a major ecological disaster in case of a spill.

    see here for a flask test ..