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Cutting windmill blades

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by KSSS, Aug 27, 2019.

  1. KSSS

    KSSS Senior Member

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    Those links are interesting. Doesn't sound like industry has a solution for these blades and there are a lot more inbound.
     
  2. chroniekon

    chroniekon Senior Member

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    Could portions of the blade be used as a culvert?
     
  3. Ronsii

    Ronsii Senior Member

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    Yeah, that's kinda what I got out of the little research I did... and yep... there's gonna be a whole lot more!!! especially since some of em' aren't even lasting the 25 years they are supposed to plus the newer ones are made even bigger/longer with the same amount of material.... = more stresses!!!! == shorter life :eek:
     
  4. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I wonder just how much fuel those things save when considering all the resin used to make them, all the fuel used to move them from place to place and finally all the bother to scrap or recycle them. So how do they save money and the environment?
     
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  5. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Have to wonder if there is an opportunity for someone to develop a means to repair instead of replacing those blades. From one site I looked at the worst wear is on the leading edge of the blades.
     
  6. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Is not really considered with as slow as these seem to move but the outer length of these blades is moving close to sound barrier in distance covered even at slow rotational speed. Small particles of dust, small birds and insects, even rain erodes them like a power blaster.
     
  7. CatRen

    CatRen Member

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  8. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    I am seeing a Garden hose supplied Wet Saw. That would keep dust down but how would you collect the dripping running mess?
     
  9. CatRen

    CatRen Member

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  10. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Thanks
     
  11. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I would think you could tarp and run off sock the cutting area, and kind of "retaining pond" the wet residue and then clean it up. The problem I see with the circular cutting wheel is you would have to be rolling or flipping the blade all the time to get it cut up. Kind of like cutting 8"x12" wood blocks with a 7 3/4" circular saw. Not enough blade for the material.

    I was thinking more along the lines of a big wood processer with a grapple . Where they grab the logs and cut it to length with the big hyd. chainsaw arm and then can lay them down. But it would take a really big one to handle those blades. Do they make those that can handle 8'- 10' diameter logs?
     
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  12. Ronsii

    Ronsii Senior Member

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    All you'd have to do is mount the blade at the root(on the flange) to a rotator and have the cutting device on top(or side) as the rotator spins the blade... start at the tip end obviously ;) and work your way towards the rotator :)
     
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  13. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    A friction crane guillotine would the lowest tech solution. Not very portable and probably only cheap compared to an excavator mounted rock saw. A wire saw would at least be extremely portable.

    Video of the rock saw cutting blades from @CatRen's link:
     
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  14. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I think the rock saw blade would be a pain. Rolling, bracing, propping it up, and that's a really small windmill blade he's working on. It would be a job with a bigger blade, and I could see it pinching the blade pretty easy.

    I'm thinking along the lines of the shear/ gilloutine idea, but with hydraulic power, built on a semi trailer like the car crushers. Load and push the windmill blade into it with a loader that has a grapple on it. Feed in 10-15' foot at a time, and bam. Big enough frame that the whole end of the blade fits into it 12' x 12' square opening or so.

    Something like a overgrown log splitter/ blade and anvil/ car crusher semi trailer monstrosity. Big powerfull ram. Maybe in two halves on the trailer and the press frame unfolds and pins in to feed the blades through. Build it out of some old factory heavy flywheel press.

    I'd reinvent the wheel if someone hadn't already made it.
     
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  15. Hobbytime

    Hobbytime Senior Member

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    run them over with a big dozer and use the dozer blade to snap the fiberglass in place to make smaller sections....
     
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  16. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Could you just take a big hoe and run the tracks up on the blade, then grab the end with the bucket and break it off? It works with big trees.
     
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  17. Wytruckwrench

    Wytruckwrench Senior Member

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    Run them through a roto-grinder.
    I would think somebody would take the material to recycle. Very interesting problem.
    Somebody that comes up with the right idea/procedure is going to make a bunch of money.
     
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  18. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    Maybe a really big track loader with a 4 in 1 to grab, lift, pinch but even then I think it might be too thick and strong at the fat end.

    I like the car crusher guillotine idea.

    Also something like a large wood chipper might be a cool invention if you could figure out how to get it in there.

    Where is R G Letorneau when we need him?
     
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  19. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Was just reading up on this going on in Germany where they and the Dutch in recovery of their turbine detritus are eliminating that trash waste. They actually built a facility to use Pyrolytic Gasification to take the ground up fbgls residuals converting the epoxy component to a fuel and recovering the glass fibers with other remnant solids to emplace in concrete at a Holcim facility. Makes the concrete more stable with the added fibrous crap as well sets it into a fixed material not in a dump. The fuel side is used in the Cement Kiln process prior to Concrete production. They do NOT however give any real value numbers as to the expenses nor the cost of the pyrolytic conversion which also takes fuels. The author also ignored a question on fiber release as the concrete weathers and would that be a concern.
     
  20. Bls repair

    Bls repair Senior Member

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    Chain saw for wood or may one concrete,operator in moon suit.
     
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