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Skid steer in snow

Discussion in 'Skid Steers' started by Farmtruck, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. Farmtruck

    Farmtruck Active Member

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    Was wondering. First year with the cat skid steer. It's a rubber tire model. Was out crossing over the lawn this evening. Traction was terrible. Tires are at about 85%. Snow is roughly 8 inchs deep. Any tricks to getting better traction? Such as deflating tires? Do tracks perform better?Thanks for reading.
     
  2. ol'stonebreaker

    ol'stonebreaker Senior Member

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    If you have space between the tires and the chain case chain it up. If the wheel studs are long enough you can make spacers to fit over the studs and move the wheels out further. Otherwise keep the bucket down when traveling forward and never back into deep snow.
    Mike
     
  3. KSSS

    KSSS Senior Member

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    Chains make all the difference. Get the HD double chain versions. They are not cheap but very effective. Depending on the machine you can flip the wheels to increase the offset without spacers.
     
    davecampbell likes this.
  4. Twisted

    Twisted Senior Member

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    Start with good chains on the rear wheels. The front tires have less weight on them and are off the ground while scraping snow.
     
  5. rev16.11invoice

    rev16.11invoice Member

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    [​IMG]

    I cannot say that I have ever ran anything like these. My company has track units (we run camso "zig zag" tracks fyi), but perhaps they are worth your consideration...

    Ol'stonebreaker makes good points about chains and using the buckets to assist with traction/not backing into anything deep.

    Again I can't say from personal experience if these are worth a damn and I would imagine chains might cost less, but I also live in the very far north and some of the snow removal contract guys up here swear by wheeled skidsteers and I don't see them run chains in the parking lots they are clearing.
     
  6. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    No tracks are not better tires are the way in snow it was probably warm snow that's going to be slippery and pack under the tires making ice that's were chains will really help of course going over the lawn you don't want to drop the bucket and there is only so much snow you can pack under the belly before even chains dont help much
     
  7. xgiovannix12

    xgiovannix12 Senior Member

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    I use grouser tracks in the summer for muddy work I would not recommend them in the snow. I suggest chains for snow.
     
  8. check

    check Senior Member

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    I prefer ordinary chains on all four, without any grouser/V bar protrusions, as the latter make a skid steer ride really rough. For moving snow, use an oversized bucket if you have access to one.
     
  9. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    Since the question was about crossing the lawn, I'm not sure whether your intention is to use it for snow removal, or regular dirt work when there's snow on the ground. If it's the former, it was a long time ago, but I recall a discussion on one of the snow plowing forums where a snow removal contractor said they ran truck tires on their skid loaders. Truck tires are a lot more flexible than skid steer tires, and supposedly that makes enough of a difference to make it worthwhile.
     
    512high likes this.
  10. KSSS

    KSSS Senior Member

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    If you go chains, just don't go cheap. They wont last.
     
  11. Swannny

    Swannny Senior Member

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    Camso sks753 do well in the snow if you only want tires. Or Galaxy muddy buddy's.

    Chains do better, but mark up paved driveways.

    I like the Camso OTT rubber tracks. Got a pair on my Case...they do awesome in snow, especially deep snow. Machine is able to climb on top of it. Pal-mar sells them too.
     
  12. Twisted

    Twisted Senior Member

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    I have a set of the Prowler tracks like posted above. It is all but unstoppable with them on. I paid about $1800 if I remember right. The problem is taking them on & off for varying conditions. Chains take 1/4 of the time.
    I was never a fan of rubber tracked skids in snow until I ran some ASV/Cat units. They are night & day compared to the big block pattern many companies use.
     
    DIYDAVE likes this.
  13. cdm123

    cdm123 Senior Member

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    The trick is to get too the pavement, gravel etc. then you will have traction.
     
  14. seville009

    seville009 Well-Known Member

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    CNY
    My tracked skidsteer goes through a few feet of snow with no problems. Alot depends on the track pattern of course. The bigger/wider the lugs, the less effective they’ll be
     
  15. ironjunkie

    ironjunkie Well-Known Member

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  16. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder

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    I've been doing snow with my machine since I bought it in 2000. The chevron style construction tires it came with were dismal in the snow. When they wore out a got a set with treads more similar to truck snow tires and they're much better. All of my work was on level ground but when that changed to doing areas with slopes I added chains to the rear axle as has been mentioned. Haven't ever been stuck with it.



    solideal tire.jpg
     
  17. mcald62

    mcald62 Member

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    E2B21F82-BCB8-4FAE-9D2E-AE60F8C6DA2F.jpeg My machine has foam filled tires and does very well in the snow. The foam filling adds a considerable amount of weight to the machine. Only the very iciest conditions cause it to loose traction.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
  18. Dichdgr

    Dichdgr New Member

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    californai
    Bought Camso snow track for my T770......Epic fail....Turned it into a toboggan. May work great on a flat ice rink, but NOT in the mountains.
     
  19. ThreeCW

    ThreeCW Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    near Calgary, Alberta
    I've had good luck using chains on the rear of my 242B for plowing snow on a 1/2 mile long gravel driveway. I use an 8 ft snow bucket to push snow off of my high profile road which means that I often am off the road surface to remove the snow. With a good set of chains, I have never been stuck. You can get various type of chain depending on how aggressive you need to be (i.e. regular link, square link, v-bar and studded in order of aggressiveness). As someone noted, aggressive chains are not suitable for pavement so you want match your chains to the type of road surface that you are plowing. Another options is studded winter snow tires ... similar to what is used on a truck. Below is my 242B chained up for winter plowing.

    IMG_1327.JPG
     
    check and Jonas302 like this.
  20. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

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    Otsego, Mn
    I ran chains on my 1845c for many year. They worked great.
    But for the S650 I decided to get a set of snow tires and they were even better.
    More ground clearance and more speed with the narrow & tall tires. Great ride and ridiculous traction.
    I have a steep uphill section and I can plow uphill now. Before it was always get to the top and plow down.
    20180914_114850.jpg 20180914_120244.jpg 20181224_160346.jpg
     
    check likes this.