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Skid steer in snow

Discussion in 'Skid Steers' started by Farmtruck, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. ThreeCW

    ThreeCW Well-Known Member

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    phil314,
    Good to hear that snow tires are working well for you.
    What size of snow tires did you go with? Are those mounted on Bobcat wheels or aftermarket?
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
  2. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

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    There are a couple different sizes.
    I went with the biggest - 255/70R22.5
    They are about 37.5 inches tall, about 4.5 taller than regular tires.
    They give 2.25 inches more ground clearance which is great for deeper snow.
    The rims are aftermarket and came with the tires, the rims are 22.5 diameter.
     
  3. DIYDAVE

    DIYDAVE Senior Member

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    Anyone else see the error, in the above picture?;)
     
  4. ThreeCW

    ThreeCW Well-Known Member

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    My windshield wiper blade is missing? My left chain chain case was low on oil (I found that out yesterday when draining it)? One of the stickers is wrong? Is this like a "Where's Waldo" photo?
     
  5. Ronsii

    Ronsii Senior Member

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    I think his red part fell off :eek:
     
  6. DIYDAVE

    DIYDAVE Senior Member

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    I was referring to a single set of chains, on the rear. There are those that would say it causes stress, to the drive line, in the gear cases...;)
     
    ThreeCW and Ronsii like this.
  7. ThreeCW

    ThreeCW Well-Known Member

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    DIYDAVE,
    Thanks for your comment on the uneven gear case loading that may result with running a single set of chains. What you say makes sense. I may try running with chains on all 4 tires to both assist in traction and even up the gear case load. I appreciate your input. Regards, 3CW
     
  8. jacobd

    jacobd Well-Known Member

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    Skid steers normally experience an uneven load on the drive train because the engine is always present but the payload is not, which gives the rear tires more traction on average. Chaining up the front tires may give you more traction overall but it will also make it slightly harder to turn. And it will do almost nothing to "correct" the front/rear load bias.
    Personally I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  9. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

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    I'll throw my 2 cent in here too.
    Even with 2 or 4 chains in snow/ice, I've got far less traction than on dirt or asphalt, so how much stress can this be putting on the drive train.
    With 2 rear chains it's still fairly easy to spin the tires. I usually ran 4 chains just because it gave better overall traction.
     
  10. check

    check Senior Member

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    Wow. Didn't that throw off the lifting arm/bucket geometry a lot?
     
  11. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

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    It raises the machine/quick attach about 2.25 inches. That might affect a bucket angle a little, but I don't use a snow bucket.
    I use a plow for plowing snow and since it's 3+ ft out in front, a couple inches at the mounting point doesn't really change the angle noticeably.
    In fact it even helps a little since I'm less likely to bottom out the plow frame on uneven terrain.
     
    check likes this.
  12. KSSS

    KSSS Senior Member

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    I wouldn't worry about the wear of only running one set of chains. I have done that for the last 20 plus years over a variety of machines and never had an issue. Chains front and back give you the best traction obviously but I had good success with only a set on the back as well.
     
  13. ThreeCW

    ThreeCW Well-Known Member

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    Seems to be some different opinions on one set of chains or two. I also checked one of the snow plow forums and saw the same split response. I may try another set of chains for added traction when plowing uphill ... and perhaps (??) some benefit of balancing the load on the gear case. Thanks for the feedback.
     
  14. Ronsii

    Ronsii Senior Member

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    I guess it comes down to 'do you need them?' kinda like the guys I've seen driving a car with only one chain on one driven wheel... personally I think it was their lazy side that said I only need one ;)

    When I was moving snow with my skid I put on all eight chains I had!!! and was still getting stuck a few places:eek: if I had only put one on each rear tire I wouldn't have gotten anything done... all depends on your needs determined by the conditions ;)
     
  15. Rob Gunn

    Rob Gunn Well-Known Member

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    The best setup that I've ever had and have been running for 12 years now: Bobcat S175, chains on only the rear, 6' snow-blower. Pushing snow can be done but you will always run out of traction before you run out of power, also hard to keep the bucket from digging into the ground. I know the snow-blower is the most expensive option but hands down the easiest and fastest.
     
  16. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    Often if you need more clearance, some of those wheels are farm wheels and can be swapped left to right to gain more space and keep the tires running in the same direction.
     
  17. DIYDAVE

    DIYDAVE Senior Member

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    With the snows we get here(mostly slush), I just have a snow blade on the front of the ASC, right now... Might need it tomorrow...;)
     
  18. denver05

    denver05 Member

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    20200105_155127.jpg 20191227_192203.jpg

    Newbie , just got the 1845c for playing on the property.

    Built a set of chain for the rear , 12 degrees inclined gravel driveway. Works good so far. Will likely add a set to the front.
     
  19. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder

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    Skid steers by design constantly put uneven loads on the drive case. One set of chains or two isn't going to make a difference in the longevity of the drivetrain. Add to the mix that your inherently working in slippery conditions and there's really nothing to worry about. I run chains on the rear of my machine too for snow, I'm sure two sets would be better traction but it seemed overkill for what I do.
     
  20. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    overkill is awesome, quad vbar chains is a good way to go. having a full cab is nice too, sure beats a set of coveralls and a motorcycle helmet to keep your face from freezing.
     
    kshansen likes this.