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more pics of equipment stuck!

Discussion in 'Other Earthmoving Equipment' started by 9420pullpan, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. 9420pullpan

    9420pullpan Senior Member

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    this is from KSB in colorado from ACMOC

    hanstuck1jpg5cz.jpg

    hanstuck21wl.jpg

    hanstuck30tf.jpg
     
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  2. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    Morons there is a point that you should give up and quit digging your self deeper. My guess is the pickup was first then the hoe, loader and last the dozer.
     
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  3. atgreene

    atgreene Senior Member

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    Here's one I saw yesterday. This is a potato or corn field in Fryeburg Harbor. I wondered why the tractor had stopped in the middle of the field until I stopped and zoomed in. There was another tractor coming to help him, but I don't know how they made out. We've been getting lots of rain, to the point where many of the corn fields were tilled back under and I suspect that is what they were attempting to do here.
     

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  4. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    Oh Deere!:eek2
     
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  5. 544D10

    544D10 Well-Known Member

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    In the 2nd pic it kinda looks like the loader hit the engine cover of the hoe.
     
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  6. LowBoy

    LowBoy Senior Member

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    Ouch...

    These dudes are having a BAAAAAD day, to say the least...:Banghead
     
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  7. alan627b

    alan627b Senior Member

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    I saw that first post on the Cat bulletin board before, it was eplained that the folks driving the pickup got it stuck first, then went and "borrowed" the equipment to try and get the truck out, then buried the cats too. Did a fair amount of damage to the equipment too, I remember. This is what the guys found when they got back to work on Monday.
    They did get caught.....all I can remember right now,
    alan627b
     
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  8. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Alan
    Thanks for clearing that up. I was about to think someone needed fired!

    It looks like the crew had their work cut out freeing all that iron. Might need to wait a few months.
     
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  9. Nick Drew

    Nick Drew Resigned

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    Nick Drew to the rescue!!

    In this photo I was called on to help pull this Komatsu D65 dozer out of a sticky situation on a road job in Cornwall England last year!!
     

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  10. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    I know I have posted these before, but here it goes again.
    Brian
     

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  11. HeyUvaVT

    HeyUvaVT Senior Member

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    holy crap..those last pics are crazy...first time i have seen them...any back story? how did they get them unstuck?:eek:
     
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  12. Lashlander

    Lashlander Senior Member

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    Cool pics!:thumbsup
    They probably ran one of their Komatsus out there and towed em back in.:yup
     
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  13. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    :pointlaugh :falldownlaugh :falldownlaugh :falldownlaugh
     
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  14. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Hahaha, nice try. We don't have any Komatsu's at that mine. But here is what happens when the Komatsu's at the other mine venture out into this stuff.

    Brian
     

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  15. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    This is at an Oilsands mine in Northern Alberta, Canada. These are the dozers we use to work and handle the sand once it has been handled and processed by the plant to extract the bitumen. It gets pumped to us by pipelines to large ponds where we work with it to establish solid ground again. The water in the slurry gets trapped in pockets underneath the sand, silt and clay and we occasionally drop machines into these pockets since you can tell they are there until you are in one. There are also soft spots that develop and that is what happened to the D7R's. The deep one was the first one in, and the shallower one was a new guy who didn't follow the proper procedure and got himself stuck too.

    It took a week to get both out. We had to build roads out to them with good material, then dig around them, lift and pull really hard! For each machine, it took two 589 sidebooms lifting, a D7R and a D375 pulling, and a 375 Cat hoe and an EX450LC Hitachi hoe lifting and pulling to get them out.
    Quite the show really.

    These are pictures of the 375 digging around the deep one once the road was built and it had sunk farther...and what it looked like when it was out for comparison.

    Brian
     

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  16. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Here are a couple from a place I used to work. The guy in the background wearing the blue hood was the operator. In all fairness, it wasn't his fault entirely. He was told by an engineer that it was safe to walk through there, he pretested and was told by the superintendant to do it.
    He wasn't stuck as bad as this at first, but the same superintendant decided to dig around it to pul it out. They didn't have neough power to pull it out and the machine sunk further before the hole collapsed around it. So the not so super-intendant said "Well, that didn't work....do it again!" They did, and the same thing happened again. That's how it got in so deep. It took us 18 hours to get it out using two TD25's, an 850C, PC200LC, 892E LC, and an EX700 LC. We were all filthy by the time it was over.

    Brian
     

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    Last edited: Mar 22, 2007
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  17. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Brian
    Just wanted to thank you for the pictures and the story to go with it.

    Did the dozers shown go back to work? If so, how much damage did they get from thier journey into the tailings?

    Great to have your input here
     
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  18. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Hi Jerry,

    All of the dozers went back to work eventually. The D7R's cost about 400,000 each to get rebuilt. They are full of electrical gremlins now...surprise surprise. The D155 was also rebuilt and put back to work, however I am not at that mine and never heard how much it cost.

    Brian
     
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  19. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    Excellent pics and story, Alco. Do you have anymore? :drinkup
     
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  20. dayexco

    dayexco Senior Member

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