1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

Workers laughed at safety audit

Discussion in 'Safety Issues' started by .RC., Nov 6, 2014.

  1. .RC.

    .RC. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    Qld, Australia
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-11-06/roy-hill-personnel-in-safety-breaches/5872848

    I wonder what the "clear breaches" were...

    I am of the belief that stupid safety rules create safety hazards... Being a mine site in AU, and knowing mine sites in AU went full retard on "safety" the "safety breaches" was probably getting something done in a cost effective manner..
     
  2. maddog

    maddog Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    730
    Location:
    middle TN
    I believe safety is important, but the safety must come from the individual.

    I agree completely, right along with some of the safety devises that have been added to certain things. Some of these devices actually dumb down the person running the equipment. example; take some of the crap in vehicles today, what happens when the automatic pilot goes out, while Dingding is texting? Some folks do not know the dangers associated with certain equipment because they don't get the concept of the equipment.
     
  3. Plant Fitter

    Plant Fitter Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    327
    Location:
    Australia
    It's about time a safety audit was laughed at. There should be more of it.
     
  4. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    7,107
    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    One safety thing that bugs me is the guarding on some engines. The belts are so covered with guards it is impossible to see the condition of the belt. Like on the engine in our 769D and 773G Cat trucks. If some dummy is stumbling around standing in front of the front tires while the engine is running he may have more to worry about than getting caught in a fan belt! If the machine moves or someone turns the steering wheel it's all over.

    That being said proper guarding on things like conveyors are very important.

    Another one is the wheel chocks they insist on us using when ever a machine is stopped, even on level ground. On all but the 773G they have us using those molded rubber chocks that are at the most 8 inches tall. Do they really think they will even have any effect if a 988H decides to move? And yes they want us to use them on the 350 Excavator and the D9H!
     
  5. jjimbo

    jjimbo Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    39
    Occupation:
    Field mechanic/ owner operator
    Location:
    so cal
    The silliest thing that I ever seen was a D9R with a blade full of dirt, ripper buried in the ground, on flat ground. It had chock blocks front and rear on each track.
     
  6. pajibson

    pajibson Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2013
    Messages:
    286
    Location:
    metro detroit
    That wasn't on a military installation was it? That sounds like something a safety officer or sergeant major came up with.
     
  7. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    6,452
    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    Safety has become just another lever to use for power and money. No one is against working safer but plenty are ready to stand around and decide what is safe and what isn't. Tack a title on a wonk and he will tell you how many lives he has saved because us in the blue collar sides of life are too stupid to keep from getting hurt.
     
  8. mikebramel

    mikebramel Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,517
    Location:
    milwaukee
    This is worth repeating... many many times
     
  9. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Messages:
    437
    Occupation:
    Ret
    Location:
    vining mn
    That sounds about right. A friend of mine, combat engineer told me their new safety officer had them using 12, yes 12 chains and binders to tie down a dozer to a lowboy. That was in the early 80's.

    Rick
     
  10. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2012
    Messages:
    3,540
    Occupation:
    Retired Cons't. Supt./Hospitals
    Location:
    Moose Lake, MN
    The company I just retired from is doing a lot of work in the oil and power industry. On these sites they have a certified safety official for every 25 people or fraction there of. At a safety seminary I recently had to attend, there was considerable discussion about these sites. The accident rate (serious and minor incidents) on these sites are 4 times higher than our average construction site. Fortunately (knock on wood) not our crews. As we got into discussing it, many speculate that the accident rate is so high because they are so "horsesh;;t" to work for that good craftsmen that can get a job anywhere will not go on them sites. I believe there could be something to it. The guys are so paranoid about getting wrote up on a BS safety item that they miss the big stuff. Thoughts?
     
  11. jjimbo

    jjimbo Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    39
    Occupation:
    Field mechanic/ owner operator
    Location:
    so cal
    This dozer that I am referring to was on a mine site.