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What could possibly happen...

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by CM1995, Nov 24, 2015.

  1. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Take a look at any of Fred Dibnah's chimney-felling videos in the previous posts and he drops them exactly like dropping a tree in regard to determining which way he wants the chimney to fall. The only difference between a chimney and a tree is that once the chimney gets a few degrees of angle it starts to come apart, but that doesn't affect the direction in which it falls one iota, it just makes a neater pile of bricks on the ground.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2015
  2. maddog

    maddog Senior Member

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    that was my point Nige, the tree stays together(for the most part) but the chimney is brittle and shatters like a glass. I have logged many trees through the years and even they can be unpredictable.
     
  3. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Small world eh' Nige.:)

    I don't remember exactly why it was demolished as I was a youngster, just remember that's the bridge Burt Reynolds jumped.:D

    Now that I-22 is almost complete it's much faster to get from Jasper to Birmingham, the connection to I-65 is still under construction.

    On a side note I had an uncle that sold welding rods to Drummond, they were the family that lived in Jasper. Ya'll might have crossed paths.
     
  4. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    That's the nice thing about a chimney, it always drops into less space than the height of the stack because it falls apart on the way down. e.g. a 200ft high chimney would probably drop into a 150ft space as measured from the chimney base. Fred would drop a 20ft diameter chimney stack probably 150+ft high into a 60ft wide space between two buildings. T'aint hard when you know what you're doing - which is where we came in.

    Not B&D Welding and Machine on Hwy 78 East just outside Jasper by any chance..?
     
  5. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Wikipedia said it was damaged in a wreck.
     
  6. Jim D

    Jim D Senior Member

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    Yes, Nige, exactly right. Fred Dibnah had 'face cuts' in the chimneys like face cuts in trees; large enough not to close as the chimney fell over. The problem that the excavator guy, and others, have is that when the face that he is pecking at fails, it only has a few 'bricks' worth of clearance. The gap closes, the chimney stops hard-up on the bricks, and the section above shears, and if the whip is right, the chimney falls back the wrong way. It's like watching someone cut down a tree without a face cut; it always 'barber-chairs', only a question of how high and how wild...
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2015
  7. OCR

    OCR Senior Member

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  8. OCR

    OCR Senior Member

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    You got it, Jim... :cool2

    No question about it, you got it, Jim ... :thumbsup



    OCR...
     
  9. tctractors

    tctractors Senior Member

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    In the U.K. at 1 time in heavy Industrial areas the sky line was full of Smoke Stacks, these have nearly all gone as the use for them faded into the past, so the Falling of them is something that was mastered very well by quite a few people that undertake this sort of work, Fred had 90 Stacks down over his life, but at 1 point all he did was repair them by Banding or Pointing up the cement joints and replacing failed brick work, the Stack down thing being more common in the 1970's through 2000 period, Banded Stacks tended to always fall in a longer distance than their hight, with Re-Pointed Stacks often doing a similar trick, the strength a bit of fresh mortar gave a Chimney is well known, only the old original Stacks would fall in a shorter distance than the hight it stood, at No time ever can I recall a Chimney being Felled via an excavator alone without Props and Burn method used.
    The Chump in the Komatsu had a good opportunity to make a name for himself as a Skilled Demolition Worker, I wonder if he did any Home Work on the task as Fred and others are well documented with good Video footage on Blasting and Prop and Burn methods, anyhow the "Chump" in a Komatsu is now a common joke Video passed around by the Young to the Old in the U.K. of a very lucky man needing a new Job.
    tctractors
     
  10. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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  11. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Yeah CM , sounds like they are painting him in the media as the " Fall guy " ( pun intended ) .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_guy

    The city is fishing for someone to blame it on to save face . They hired him to start with .

    Funny thing is ......... If it went off as planned all would be cool and good .......

    But it did not so got to go lay blame on somebody ?

    My Amish buddy got threatened buy a fire marshal over selling propane tanks ........... Amish buddy tells fire marshal to take a hike & go get a real job .:cool2
     
  12. Rustedcutlery

    Rustedcutlery Member

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  13. Turbo21835

    Turbo21835 Senior Member

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    Im a little late to this one. That said why do all these guys screwing silos and stacks up want to wreck them like they are cutting down a tree? You break windows out of stacks leaving them standing on legs. At that point, you can shoot it, or do other crazy stuff. When you shoot a stack thats one three legs you set your charges in two of the legs, and it doesn't take a lot, and once the charges have gone off gravity pulls the stack over. Now to the crazy stuff. Ive seen a stack of similar size, wrecked with nothing but a 763 bobcat and hammer. Once the "windows" were broken out, and the stack was on three legs, thats where the fun began. The guy running the job slide a piece of schedule 80 steel pipe over the hammer bit and went to town. He worked from the back side, through one of the windows, pushing the bricks out from the leg to the left, then he would push the bricks on the right leg. Working from the back side he was able to watch the bricks to see if a gap was opening up. He continued the process until the chimney trips, none of us of the site knew if he made it or not after the stack hit the ground, it was nothing but a cloud of dust. A few seconds later he drove that bobcat out of the cloud covered in soot and masonry dust.
     
  14. tctractors

    tctractors Senior Member

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    Turbo, its never to late to comment, I must say the Ram Rod method sounds very good and effective, the down side is the Soot Cloud that is coming the drivers way like a Crazy Backfire, in the U.K. we seemed to like the timber prop and burn method as it also gets rid of all those knackered tyres back at the Yard, plus it gives you a good chance to get out of the dust and soot as you watch from a safe spot.
    tctractors