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Service crane pump

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Numbfingers, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys,
    Just bought a used 3200# crane for my service truck and it's plumbed for PTO. I don't have a PTO yet and was wondering if I could get some input on electric pump vs PTO. The crane manufacturer (Stellar) can sell me an easy to install kit with power unit with integral reservoir for somewhere around $1000-1500. Input on type of pump and PTO would be welcome as well. I think the PTO is probably more durable but involves more work and possibly more cost. I just need to get this up and running in the next month or so.
     
  2. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    Small tank with a belt driven clutch pump would be easy, depending on what your truck is....
     
  3. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    The crane mfg might have some input as well, I have a electric hydraulic dump bed and whereas its used infrequently, its more than good enough. If I was dumping 20 times a day, I might want the faster pto setup. See if the crane company's unit is any different than one from surplus center.
     
  4. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    The advantage of the PTO pump is both speed/power and in my opinion longevity. I've had dump trucks set up both ways and I prefer the PTO. I've never replaced a PTO pump but I've had to replace a number of electric pump motors. Without seeing your particular setup it's tough to say how electric would work out but one thing that comes to mind is you'd have to sort out the valving to supply pressure where you want it. You would need a solenoid controlled manifold with enough ports to handle all of your functions of the crane, this manifold is usually mounted directly to the pump.

    What truck will this be mounted to? That will help determine which your best option is too. You can get an underhood belt driven pump, transmission driven pump or even an out front crankshaft driven pump. If the crane is already set up for an auxiliary pump it might be less costly to go that route than convert to electric.
     
  5. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    Depending on your frequency of use the Stellar electric kit would work fine. It will take some extra battery power to use for an extended length of time, even with the engine idling. One advantage of electric powered cranes is that you can use them inside a building without running the engine. That is the one thing I like about my old 6006E Autocrane.
     
  6. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    I think "depending on your frequency of use" is the key here. I have a little experience with each type of pump, except crankshaft driven on a truck. Assuming you're using this once a day on average, and aren't terribly concerned with speed, I'd go with an electric pump. Mine's on a bucket truck, and I prefer the slower speed and not having the engine running when I'm in the air (I plug in a charger).

    The cost is going to depend on what you have with the crane already. Do you have the pto pump? the valves? If you're missing the valve manifold then that's a bigger problem than the pump.
     
  7. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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    I have the valves, just missing the means to make pressure and flow. I just checked with a local pto dealer and I'm looking about $2000 for pump, pto, reservoir, and lines. I don't foresee using it everyday, based upon current customers. Ive already made a bunch of money without one, but will need one next summer for sure. Im still waiting on a quote for the Stellar kit, which is pretty straight forward. I'll have to look into a belt driven pump to see what's out there. I have an Isuzu so aftermarket selection is slim. I appreciate the input from everybody while I try to outfit my service truck without going in debt or making the job harder than it needs to be.
     
  8. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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  9. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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  10. Old Doug

    Old Doug Senior Member

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    Im old school longevity pto all the way but not haveing to lisen to a engine run would be worth alot to me. If you have a gasoline engine compresser could it charge the batts?
     
  11. mikebramel

    mikebramel Senior Member

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    Yes, 12/13/14 engines usually have a 10A charger. So if the motor is drawing 100A you will need to run that compressor for at least 10 seconds for every second the crane is running
     
  12. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    My old Autocrane draws 60 amps at full load, My F-800 has 3 group 31 batteries plus the group 27 in the crane. I can use the crane most of the day without losing enough power to start the truck. But I have had to plug a 50 amp charger into the welder once or twice to get through the day. My compressor is tied into the truck batteries and I have rope started it to charge the truck up. Oops. It took awhile.
     
  13. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    No reason a belt drive compressor couldn't add a 3rd pulley to the motor to drive a one wire alternator to supply 40-60 amps of power. 2000 shaft rpm should be enough for an alternator. 1:1 off a 3600 rpm gas engine should be dandy.
     
  14. CableDW10cat

    CableDW10cat Active Member

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    Electric setup. Pack a good battery charger if using crane a ton, plug into wall if possible, if not possible run the truck a few minutes each hour.. I also carry exhaust hose for this... at least this way you have the option of running in an enclosed space.
     
  15. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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    I looked at several options recommended here and decided to go with the stellar kit since its a real easy install and the power unit mounts directly to the crane. I don't have space for an engine driven belt pump, and a pto setup is almost double the cost of the stellar kit. I looked at a few other dc power unit kits and only found one that would meet flow and psi requirements. It was cheaper but I prefer the on-crane mount and factory fit. Kinda don't wanna mess around with it too much, just need it finished so I can press forward. I do appreciate the input and I saved the link for Bailey's for future reference.
     
  16. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    what were the pressure and flow requirements, just for askin and curiosity's sake.
     
  17. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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    2gpm, 2500 psi