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rb auction

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by trekkar, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    A load lock is a valve the put on the gravity side of a cylinder so that if you blow a hose the weight of the implement won't come crashing down on someone. It takes a pilot pressure to release the valve. So if you want the boom to come down, the pilot pressure from the boom down joy stick opens the load lock mounted on the boom up side of the cylinder.
     
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  2. muzy

    muzy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks John.
     
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  3. CashGhost

    CashGhost Active Member

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    Very true. More I am digging in the industry, more I see how bad it could be. Unfortunately there are many dishonest people out in the market. Especially in the UK, these guys have mechanics they work with and what they do they decrease the HOURS on the machine. So the machine shows 5000 hours, but it reality it could be more than double of this number. I think the only way to check is either to get a professional appraisal or ask for service documents where you somehow can find the hours on the record.
     
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  4. Vetech63

    Vetech63 Senior Member

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    Auction equipment...……..UGHo_O Its like looking for gold...……….most of the time you go broke before you ever find any.
     
  5. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Local HE Auction, guy I know in STL wanted me to go look, walked the yard for half an hour seeing nothing I would bid on. He was emphatic there should be bargains and I explained NOT. Sale went off as expected, junk D6C with a blade needing major rebuild(several rust and rub throughs) and absolutely SHOT UC brought $19500, guy that bought it turned right around and advertised on FB Marketplace in a week, claiming 60% UC and great machine "Just needs new batteries" only moved it one yard to another, asking $22500 for it, STILL Junk. Nothing sold at any form of reasonable price in the sale, two old Corn Queen MODOT Dump Trucks ate up with salt cancer but crew cab sold for twice what I would have considered as a Top bid, they also sit on used lots now.
     
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  6. skata

    skata Senior Member

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    yeah, there is a lot of junk at the ritchie auctions. its the place to dump equipment that you'd otherwise feel guilty about selling to someone personally!
    but sometimes there is rental company equipment there that is legit. but their fees, sales tax, and shipping fees really all add up.
    i've been buying a lot from Bidadoo on ebay lately. mostly former rental equipment, inspection reports, and very low fees, and no sales tax in many states.
     
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  7. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    I think it depends on the area and the particular auction. The RB auction site in Nisku can have the whole gambit of machines from brand new with warranty to broken down parts machines. Lots of reasons to sell equipment through an auction. It doesn't mean the equipment is junk just because it goes to the auction. I think the biggest reason to sell through an auction is because you get your money right away. If you are financially stable and can afford to advertise your equipment privately, great. An auction takes the hassle out of trying to sell stuff on your own and it can be more than a hassle. Some people do bid stupid but smart buyers can find great deals on good used equipment.
     
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  8. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    So same buddy called me last night, wanted my opinion on 1150B Case so I ask where. Sends me this ad:
    https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/513129249424061/?ref=feed_rhc

    Ask him why is bothering, looking at $10k in rails shoes, adjuster seal kits and sprockets, NOT Including rollers. Then the Cute Part, he admitted been to it and looked it over, the Current happy owner told him "Easy Enough to Remove Link and get rails to tighten up", it would not start, been sitting and has a tank full of BLACK Fuel. Great. Told him GO AWAY.
     
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  9. JD955SC

    JD955SC Senior Member

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    I could not in good consciousness drop money on a piece of heavy equipment without a thorough inspection, oil samples, operating both when cold and warmed up to operating temp, and checking the logged code history for any overheating or other codes that could indicate potential abusive operation that had not been deleted. You don’t get to do a lot of that on an auction piece.

    I have done some used equipment inspections to help our sales guys put numbers on trade ins. It’s very telling what some poking around with a flashlight and a laptop can tell you about the condition of a machine and how it is typically treated.

    I have seen too many threads on here where a new owner comes on and is all “well I just got X and it overheats/stops pushing/trans slips/found water in oil/doesn’t want to start when cold, etc” meaning big $$$ is ahead to fix the issue

    My view on equipment is there are few bargains out there. There is lots of worn out junk because the companies/owners had to push it to get work on tight schedules done. Or second/third owners that made crappily rigged “repairs”
     
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  10. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    I enjoy laughing at the wasted words when a person has placed a machine on auction with a reserve that will never be met or that throws one on Craigslist then as the price draws no interest out along with minimal decreases comes the "Will go to scrap if do not get $XXXXX offer" as if that will draw any visitors. Heard a guy at that Local Auction, "My machine does not pull $xxxxx I will send it to China in a scrap boat" Guess he has not looked at price per ton of late. Had one fella offer me a FL14C for "Scrap Price" when scrap was $140-160/ton, he quoted "weighs out at 35,000 lbs", scrap price would be around $24-2500 CLEAN scrap all neat and torn apart, he would not accept less than $5500, needless to say it is NOT here.
     
  11. TD24

    TD24 Well-Known Member

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    The danger in going to an auction......
    Sometimes; in the heat of bidding, you pay too much.
    Words to live by.
     
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  12. xr4ticlone

    xr4ticlone Well-Known Member

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    My old boss did 40+ years in Heavy Equipment sales...he had two sayings...
    1 - If you bought something of mine in an auction...you got F'd.

    2 - The only value of an auction is never having to meet the guy you just F'd.

    RB does NOT protect you from bad tractors. None of them do.

    And I'd tell you that 90% of the time you're overpaying for a tractor there.

    I've said it before & I'll say it again. Find a reputable wholesaler in your area. Not only can they help you find good equipment, but they can find you better deals.

    As I told my one customer that is forever afraid I might make a dime on him...and has repeatedly shot himself in the foot trying to 'steal' a tractor, then calls me to 'fix this'...
    "Well you should be able to sell it for that much! It's the cheapest one I could find!"
    'It's not the cheapest one I found...or with the least amount of hours'
    "How would you be able to find a better deal than that???"
    'I told you, there is honor among thieves. These guys know I have to have room to make a living. They know that you'll make millions working the tractor, so they don't price it the same. Plus they are less likely to shove a bad one on me as I'm potentially much more repeat business. You're not a thief...and you'll never be considered a thief'
    "So what am I??"
    (Smiles) 'A victim?' : )

    On the other hand I saved another customer $5k on a tractor he found online vs what they told him his bottom dollar....and that $5k is after I got paid. But this guy gets it...he doesn't look at what I make...only at what he saved.
     
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  13. TD24

    TD24 Well-Known Member

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    It is known as " Sharing the wealth". LOL
     
  14. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I take a slightly different tact and if you are honest you will agree with me. I don't know any used equipment seller that is totally honest, especially if they are hard up for a sale. I've never trusted any of them and no one should trust anyone in sales of any kind. It doesn't matter if it is a franchised retail seller, broker or auction house. What's more, there is no law that states a seller can go jail for not saying anything. Due diligence is in the hands of the buyer. The buyer is acting in their own best interests and should be cognizant of all the facts of the asset. That's why I get hired before a purchase it made.

    Here is another little factoid that sellers don't tell people. They price their iron based on auction sales. Anyone and everyone can look up auction prices, sellers or buyers. If you are acting as a sellers agent, it is incumbent on you to achieve the highest sale price. If you are acting in the interest of the buyer, it is incumbent on you to achieve the lowest purchase price.

    To wrap this up, the only way you can provide value for your service as you are speaking, is by knowing the actual condition of the asset and making the statement that what you are selling or buying is somehow better than what was found somewhere else and the higher or lower price is justified. If you look at my avatar you can get an idea how long I've been in the industry. I've met only a few sales reps who's knowledge of equipment was much above a first year apprentice. If you provide value, more power to you. My experience tells my that the rest of the industry is no better than the auctions.
     
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  15. TD24

    TD24 Well-Known Member

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    Agreed... Caveat Emptor is the watchword.
     
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  16. xr4ticlone

    xr4ticlone Well-Known Member

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    I'll agree they are few & far between.
    I'll also say there is no way to 100% know what a tractor is or isn't...if I could tell with 100% certainty I'd be much richer today.

    What I can tell you is who to trust & who not to trust...and who I don't know & none of my contacts know.

    Sales people are no different than anyone else. As I like to say 'This industry is full of liars, thieves, & crooks...and that's just the customers' :)

    I don't ask my customers to blindly trust me...I tell them if I can't beat their deal, take theirs.
     
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  17. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Saying nothing is better than exaggerating the condition of a machine. In some cases the seller can be liable for gross misrepresentation of the item they are selling. I went through this on a single axle dump truck I bought several years ago. Truck had had a commercial vehicle inspection done prior to being listed for sale. Seller claimed brakes (hyd.) were all new. About 1-1/2 month's later I was hauling sand and heard a loud bang. The brake pedal was spongy when I pulled to a stop. Looked around didn't see anything obvious so limped the truck on back roads and unloaded the sand at the job. Then I limped the truck to a brake shop I cleared snow for.

    They couldn't believe what they found. Brake pads were like brand new but bearings were shot among other things. The loud bang was the right brake drum almost splitting in two! Worn over 125%. The shop said the groove inside the flared outside lip on the brake drum is a dead giveaway. They always pull at least one wheel to check. I talked to the shop that did the inspection and they said they knew the owner and took his word for it that the brakes were new. The brake shop said you never take anyone's word for it when doing an inspection. Anyway talked to a lawyer and got a student to help me. Had a discovery at the court house with the seller and the inspection shop. Took a little present in a box to the meeting. Did a bunch of introductions and everybody was wondering what was in the box. The inspection shop owners jaw almost hit the floor when I opened the box and he saw the brake drum. The hub was the only thing holding it together. Seller had a lawyer from a big law firm. I told them I had an expert witness from the brake shop that was willing to testify in court and would also be contacting the provincial authority that issues licenses for commercial vehicle inspections. I think the inspection shop was more than a little worried at this point. The repairs cost about $2200 and I ended up getting $1800 back not going to court. Legal fee's were about $300. I think I might have got it all back in court but wasn't worth the hassle. The really funny part is the truck wasn't heavy enough to actually require a commercial vehicle inspection. The seller was trying to pull a fast one but it backfired on him. If not for that inspection, I think it would have been a lot harder for me to claim gross misrepresentation although on a provincial site showing how to proceed in court, the example was for a car that was sold with apparent new brakes that were worn out.
     
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  18. xr4ticlone

    xr4ticlone Well-Known Member

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    In the US commercial buyers have very little recourse...they're expected to be business professionals who don't require or get the same considerations average consumers get.

    However, a professional evaluation by a dealer / professional shop / certified inspector is clearly a different story.

    All equipment is like a horse...they all eat and go to the vet. Some vet visits are worse than others.

    End users need to budget realistic maintenance & repairs...both time & money.
     
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  19. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Price has something to do with it but a seller can't grossly misrepresent the condition of the item. If you buy a used car $1000 it's pretty much as is. If the same car is sold for $4000 and the seller has stated unequivocally it has a rebuilt engine and transmission but dies 50 miles down the road would be an example. I think the same could apply to used equipment. Better to play dumb than make totally false statements as to condition.
     
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  20. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    I still enjoy the 60% common figure for rails when nearly that far beyond shot or just needs batteries when charging system in general is entirely crap.
    Most obvious run away faster is “Work Ready” means you will have more grease on your hands than on the machine and more time dragging wrenches then moving dirt.
     
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