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Ratchet straps for tie down?

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by Jeff D., Mar 16, 2006.

  1. chtucker

    chtucker Active Member

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    Nope, I won't. I used to. We went on a wreck with a skid tied down with straps (I works a firefighter) broke three straps and went into the rear of the truck. Those 10k straps are breaking strength, not rated as working load. We have found out here in the west that UV damage from the sun makes them much weaker.
     
  2. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    I completely agree chtucker. Theres nothing like solid steel to keep something where you put it.

    Firefighter here too.:usa
     
  3. itsgottobegreen

    itsgottobegreen Well-Known Member

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    I loaned my buddy my 773 Once (he blew the a hydro line on his in the middle of a project) I damn near flipped out when I saw him strapping it down to bring it back to my shop with these worn out and frayed ratchet straps. He was like what? They are rated for that kind of load. :Banghead I took him back to my shop and got the chains off my trailer to chain it down. Lets stay that was the 1st and last time he ever got to borrow it. :mad: I do not trust them. Yea I will strap down our 3500lb kubota if I am just going down the street. Other wise that gets chains and binders too.
     
  4. Bob Horrell

    Bob Horrell Charter Member

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    I was wondering if anyone here carried a skidsteer in the bed of a dump truck or roll off? I am planning to sometimes carry my bobcat in the bed of my dump truck. I am making ramps that go from the front of my equipment trailer into the back of the dump truck. My question is how you would secure it inside the dump bed? I was thinking of welding d-rings in the bed and securing with heavy duty straps instead of chains. The bed sides are almost 4 feet tall, so it isn't like it is going to go anywhere very easily.
     
  5. jmac

    jmac Senior Member

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    When I had a dump trailer it had the "d" rings welded to floor and thats what I would chain machine to. I think you "d" ring idea is good. One thing I found out about chaining my rubber tire stuff to trailer is that they move around alot mostly up and down because of the tires. My single drum roller is the worst and was very hard to get bound down good. What I do know is chain the back of the machine first, then move machine forward to take all the slack out of chains and then chain front down. This works great and makes the process alot faster.
     
  6. lamarbur

    lamarbur Charter Member

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    Occupation:
    part time excavator/backhoe operator
    Location:
    MA/CT state lines
    If you read DOT laws, any live load, this is to include equipment with tires, must be chained and ratcheted down... A minimum of grade 70 chains are required. I also understand that under most instances, the local police or state police for that matter, overlook these things. Here at the Union CT, weigh station, one is super crucified if caught using straps. Of course the scale is DOT and they go by the letter of law and then some... Do yourself a favor, weld in the "D" rings as you want, go to Lowes, where grade 70 at 20ft lengths, with hooks on each end sell for around $27.00 a piece, You can get wratchet or lever binders at the same tiime for about the same 27.00
     
  7. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    The 310 highlift in this picture, https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/Forum/showpost.php?p=18896&postcount=29 made a few trips in the bed of a single axle dump truck. It would just fit, with the ripper almost snug against the inside of the tailgate, and the bucket up on the cab protector. It didn't have room to move more than a few inches even if it wasn't chained down, which it never was. Of course, that was quite a while ago. I'd think long and hard before doing the same thing these days....
     
  8. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    The FMCSA rules regarding load securement are confusing and hard to read, but I've read them over many times and can't find anything that says straps cannot be used except when it comes to hauling crushed cars.

    Here is my understanding of the laws:

    They say that straps must be free from defects, and not contact anything that could cut the strap.

    If the straps are DOT rated @ X lbs WLL., and that rating meets or exceeds what is required for the equipment being transported, the straps do not have damage, or come in contact with anything that can cut it, then it is legal.

    Any chain can be used to secure a load, but without grade markings on the chain the chain will be figured at the lowest rating for a chain of its size.

    I'm not trying to say that straps are better or worse than chain, but as far as I can tell they are not illegal if used properly.

    Here are the rules: http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/truck/vehicle/cs-policy.htm


    Here's the section for Equipment: http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.asp?section=393.130

    If someone has read something official that is contrary, please let me know. I'm using straps for my skid steer and don't want to get a ticket.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2006
  9. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    Make sure the floor of your body is heavy enough gauge to resist tearing in the event of tightening your straps or a panic stop. A better idea might be to bolt your D rings in place passing the bolts through the crossmembers of the floor.
     
  10. Nac

    Nac Senior Member

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    NJ
    I have a couple hooklift boxs with 1/2" D rings welded in the corners. the trick is to weld the D rings to a steel plate about 10" x 10" x 3/8" and weld that to the deck over a crossmember that is welded to the deck. I move my Dohn Deere 250II skid steer, PC 45 mini excavator, John Deere 350C track loader and once in a while a rented 450 Dozer and never had a problem.
     
  11. mflah87

    mflah87 Well-Known Member

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    well one way to look at it, the DOT will get you for something no matter what you do.
     
  12. jhill

    jhill Well-Known Member

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    Jeff D. I tie my skid steer down with ratchet straps by the cab handholds in the front. Easy to get to and really holds it tight. The front factory tie down is in the front behind the bucket and basically impossible to use.
     
  13. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    Look at this link http://www.ccmta.ca/ENGLISH/pdf/Standard%2010.pdf#search=%22cargo%20securement%20standard%2010%22

    Scroll down to heavy equipment as cargo. It has to do with the default WLL of tie downs. Each securement strap must have a default WLL limit of 2,268 kgs (5012 lbs) A 4 inch strap only has 1,810 kgs(4000lbs)
    So in order to meet the default WLL of tie downs for securing heavy equipment, you have to use chains.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2007
  14. jhill

    jhill Well-Known Member

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    Graderforme.

    I agree with your interpretation for a heavy vehicle but I think skid steers and mini excavators are classified as light vehicles because they weight under 9926 lbs. In that case the 5012 lb limit does not apply.
     
  15. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    :yup Straps would be okay for light vehicles