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I Need to put new wood on this trailer deck. Advice please.

Discussion in 'Other Construction/Demolition Equipment' started by clydesdale6, Mar 6, 2022.

  1. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    I measured the old wood to be 1 3/4 thick x 7 1/4-1/2 wide.

    1. What size wood is this? 2x8 is supposed to be 1.5x7.25, I think.

    2. What size screw is recommended? https://www.trailerdecking.com/Trailer-Deck-Screws-Torx-2.5-inch-T40-Fasteners-4005

    The other size is only 2 inch long, so I think that is going to be too small. Those were 1/4 20 screws.

    Any advice would be great. I think I am having a friend mill the wood out of Locust.
     
  2. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Black Locust Maybe six years will be rotten, Honey Locust be lucky to get a year.
     
  3. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    Really? Why? I'm reading that locust decking will last 30+ years. What do you recommend? Thanks.
     
  4. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    If is BLACK Locust and oiled perhaps
    Honey Locust is a different breed and goes to pith in months.
     
  5. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    Ok. My friend may Oak. By the way, I couldn't find any info on the axles. Any idea how I find out what axles are on it?
     
  6. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Should be a ID tag on the tube. Unless rotted off, Photo may help, of hub assemblies/tube style(Round or Square).
     
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  7. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Oak will take more abrasive wear. Had a Equipment trailer at shop I work, did NOT anchor the boards with thru drilled self tappers to cross members, used clamping washers under the cross members. That also allowed the boards to expand and contract wetted or drying out.
     
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  8. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    20220306_153117.jpg 20220306_153117.jpg
     
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  9. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    I could not find a tag or numbers on tube.
     
  10. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    Those look no heavier than 3500# axles to me such as used in a standard car hauler, or utility type trailer. Crossmember style supports that also as common around here.
     
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  11. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    I believe so. I think it is only rated for 7k. How do I tell if Dexter or other?
     
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  12. CM1995

    CM1995 Administrator

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    For that small of a trailer I would just use PT pine.

    Teks screws are great - https://www.homedepot.com/p/Teks-12...-Self-Drilling-Screws-40-Pack-21384/100145370

    All you have to do is pre-drill the wood, the Teks screws are self tapping.

    Re-floored our 15K skid trailer 5-6 years ago with HD/Lowes PT pine and Teks screws and it's still holding up great.

    For larger trailers red oak is the way to go IMO with a couple of gallons of linseed oil swabbed on the deck before anything goes on it.
     
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  13. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    I agree
    Pine on that trailer is more than good enough. Do appear Dexter axle could be Chinese knockoffs but generally all parts similar
    Bearings and seals nearly any trailer parts supply will have.
     
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  14. mowingman

    mowingman Senior Member

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    I have done 5 or 6 trailer floors over the last 20 years or so. I always used 2x8 pine to start with. ( 2x10 or 2x12 is nice, if you can get it)
    1. Cut all your boards to fit
    2. Lay it all out on sawhorses in the sun
    3. Use a good clear porch and deck treatment applied with a pump-up sprayer, to all sides and ends. Soak it good.
    4. Let dry, turn over, soak everything again
    5. Do no3 and 4 at least twice to every surface and end.
    6. When thoroughly dried, put boards on trailer with trailer deck screws.
    7. Use 3" long, self tapping trailer deck screws.
    8. Screws are NOT really self tapping, it is best to predrill every hole with a slightly smaller drill bit. Then run the deck screws in the pilot hole you have in the wood and angle iron. If you do not predrill, about 1/2-1/3 of the screw heads will break off before you can get the wood anchored solidly to the trailer frame.
    9. After you are done, flood the surface with another coat of deck sealer. Make sure it puddles up in every screw hole.
    hope this helps.
    Jeff
     
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  15. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    If you can get black locust heartwood reasonable, then that will be one of the best available locally. 1 1/2" or even 1 1/4" (5/4") wet will be plenty for a car hauler like that. If you're planning to put skid steers on it, then use the best vertical grain boards under the tires and the crap in the middle.

    I don't like pressure treated pine, too brittle and corrosive.
     
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  16. clydesdale6

    clydesdale6 Well-Known Member

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    My friend with the mill is going to try to get me White Oak. He will mill them at 1 3/4 thickness. This is for a small Bobcat s-150 skid steer. I think it weighs almost 6k. I am going to follow the directions on www.trailerdecking.com They suggest pre drilling and then counter sinking. Do I really need 3 inch screws? I was going to go with 2.5 inches. But, I have never done this before. Thanks folks.
     
  17. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    I used Apitong on my last trailer deck jobs. By far not the cheapest but certainly the longest lasting. The one I replaced had oak and it had rotted through in about 10-12 years.
     
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  18. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    Around here practice has been to use rough sawed oak. Some will soak it with a preservative of some sort but I'm not going to get in to that ;)
     
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  19. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    I put their fancy oil on it. I think the thing that would help a trailer the most would be to keep it clean, and then tilt it when not in use so the water runs off nicely. It's far too big of a pain to keep a cover on it cuz no one will.
     
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  20. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    White Oak is probably next best. Heartwood only will go a long way to making it last.
     
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