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How much for this demo???

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by tnc110, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    This will be the biggest demo I have done (if I get the job) It is 2 story brick home, approximately 45'x85'. The first floor has tile throughout, 2nd is hardwood. All drywall on walls and ceiling. Slab in garage of course. metal roof. dirt crawl. one chimney. Hardest part is going to be making sure that all the material falls to the front, there is a cliff on the backside and if it falls over the cliff my butt will be in trouble!!!

    How much tonage is there here? How much of that is brick, concrete? and how much is wood, drywall.
    Hrs to sort through and separate brick, wood, metal/wire/copper with excavator?

    I have a 160 and a mini ex with hyd thumbs to work with.

    Also, any advice on how to ensure that it falls all to one direction?

    Thanks in advance...great forum here!
     
  2. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    oops...forgot the pics....coming in a few...
     
  3. buckfever

    buckfever Senior Member

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    As the saying goes a picture is worth a thousand words.

    Will you be using cans or hauling to the dump?

    Will you be hauling the brick and concrete to a cheaper dump site?

    Are you alowed to leave any of the matireial on site?
     
  4. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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  5. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    861a1432-0f9c-4108-baa8-66809743b452_zps5bd65487.jpg
    5e073fc7-1f91-4550-89a8-531a447dfefa_zps55913696.jpg
    e56e20b7-e3c0-4b9b-befa-5816b83dd5eb_zps4053e123.jpg
    4d72eccf-f2a3-4fd5-ad04-38022692efd0_zpsea06c859.jpg

    cliff is to the right of the last picture
     
  6. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    Will be hauling to the dump, and want to price hauling all material, including brick/conncrete to dump...dump rate is 75/ton.

    Nothing stays but the gravel in the driveway.

     
  7. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    $75 a ton thats expensive.:eek: My overtonnage rate is $15, 30's have a 6 ton cap. There is going to be a lot of weight in brick and concrete off this house. I would separate the brick and concrete the best I could and find an inert site that takes material by the load if that is available to you, it will be much cheaper. If your competition is bidding it this way you will be way high hauling all that masonry and concrete to the landfill at $75 a ton.:cool2

    For this house I would use 1200SF = 100 CY of debris. Your 30's will average 8-9 tons per can, some will be more and some will be less but average at that rate for residential demo. Is the house clear of personal items? If there are personal items in the house - clothes, furniture, etc then that will add more than you think to your demo yardage.

    As far as taking the house down, you'll need to work it from the front to the back, collapsing everything towards the front of the house. Take your 160 and start at one of the corners, bringing the house down and using the debris to build a ramp towards the back of the house. You will need to take care while you are doing this, crunching and compacting the material towards the center and front of the house. With your excavator raised up on the debris from the front of the house, take the rear roof and walls down - top to bottom pulling the debris back towards the front.

    Is the chimney a true masonry fireplace or prefab? If it's prefab then it's not an issue, just take it down with the rest of the structure. If it's a true masonry fireplace, then it will be a little trickier.
     
  8. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Not contributing anything at all towards the discussion, but why would anyone want to demo a house like that...?? From the photos it looks like a beautiful place and the brick construction should make it last better than your normal timber frame with aluminium siding. Just asking........
     
  9. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    They basically bought the view...I think 1.2 million.
     
  10. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Back home I live in an area like that. Makes some kinda sense when you put it that way although TBH I could think of better things to spend that amount of money on ...........
     
  11. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    Does 100 yds / 1200sg include the brick?
     
  12. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    I gotta be careful about pricing brick/concrete seperate...legally its gotta go to the dump. I will be taking it elsewhere, but if the wrong people get involved then I will have go take it to the dump...and if I don't figure all of it going to the dump I could get in over my head.
     
  13. Colorado Digger

    Colorado Digger Senior Member

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    I agree on the brick and concrete. Also $75.00 p/t is expensive, We are paying $50.00 p/t here in Aspen, Co. That demo debris is going to be way heavy and will kill you on your containers. We average about 7-8 ton per container. Off the top of my head I would throw 20-40's at it. Your tipping fee will probably be $1600-$1800 per 40 yard container, Although you will be using 30's more than likely b/c of the weight. The machine time shouldn't be all that much, figure maximum 50 hours at $135.00 per hour is $6750.00. Plus water and a laborer. And don't forget Mobe and admin costs. Feels like 45k or "so". I don't know your market and Am sure there are guys that would do it for less.
     
  14. Shenandoah

    Shenandoah Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought...the used brick market is fairly substantial. Is there a possibilty of those used bricks being reclaimed by a company that specializes in that line of work where you are? Perhaps they could be used as a subcontractor to dismantle the bricks and haul them away saving you dollars in the long run.
     
  15. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    I will be doing all the hauling w 18 yd dump trucks. This job is kinda out in the middle of nowhere...nearest city is 1.5 hrs away. I will have to look into recycling the brick.
     
  16. Shenandoah

    Shenandoah Well-Known Member

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  17. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    with what I face for dump fees...does $10/sq ft seem about right?
     
  18. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    It would include the brick in volume but your weights would have to be figured in. Often times I will add a multiplier, say 5-10% upon looking at a job like this to the formula. Estimating demo is not an exact science, more of an art, and most times I go with my gut after walking the property and adding a multiplier to the formula. Unfortunately the ones here giving advice don't have that option of walking the property, so we'll give you our best guess.;)

    How far away is the landfill and are you using your trucks or hired? If you are using hired trucks, what is the rate per hour? Hired trucks can eat into the profit margin quickly, especially hauling demo. A roll-off box is a set expense, except for the tonnage, that you can estimate more accurately. Hired trucks by the hour opens another can of worms. Quick stop breaks for Mountain Dews and flirting with the cashier, general farting around, waiting to get loaded at the site and waiting to dump at the landfill can get into your profit margin quickly, as you will be paying for every minute of their time. If you use a roll-off service you are putting the liability of wasted time on their shoulders to bear.:cool2

    Do you have the option of getting a roll-off service to give you a price per can with tonnage cap + overtonnage? If that's available then you can pencil down your costs more accurately. That way you can estimate how many cans you need, then estimate the tonnage (plus overages) and have a closer target to hit.
     
  19. tnc110

    tnc110 Well-Known Member

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    one truck is mine the other one/two will be hired. Probably a 1.5 hr round trip to dump. I will have to look into the roll offs. I think up here we pay per ton plus a flat rate....might be worth looking into.

    I found a 40lb/sq foot figure for the brick....sound right?
     
  20. Fastdirt

    Fastdirt Senior Member

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    I try not to overthink a demo. I look at it and say I can either do that in a day or two days. I always tell the customer to pay my dumpster guy directly. My dumpster guy will haul 30 yards for $350 or $325. He does not complain or wine like all the dumpster driver/Co.s and I let the customer know that. Then whatever you think your daily rate is worth will be your price. That house is big and a bit intimidating being 30 feet high, but you can create a trash pile 10' and you'll have more reach and be able to distance yourself. I'd hate to be tied to a load count. Roll offs are the only way to go with the C&D. Dump trucking the concrete could work out if you had a close cheap dump, but I wouldn't unless it was too good to pass up. I'd have my feet on the reverse pedals when taking out the top.

    I personally would bid that for $3500 with the hauling to be paid seperate between the customer and roll-off guy. I would allow two days for that but it could be done in a day if you get two or more roll off companies hauling for you. Hope I'm not throwing you off, I just want to give you an honest answer.