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heavy equipment shop floor questions?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by earthscratcher, Mar 28, 2019.

  1. earthscratcher

    earthscratcher Senior Member

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    excavating contractor
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    one bay will be a drive thru bay, the other bay will be the working bay,it will have the pit,tie down points and truck lift.i was just going to use conveyer belting when i bring in dozers and trackhoes.any other ideas for floor protection railroad track in concrete ,sheet steel, what would you do? tie down points what are you using,how did you install under concrete.

    pit sizes,depth, width ,length. lets see some pictures of some shop floors
     
  2. bam1968

    bam1968 Senior Member

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    I like the idea of rail road track in the concrete but I have heard people say that it can be a PITA at times. I use conveyor belting but that can be a pain as well at times. I know of a few guys put nothing down and seem to get by pretty good. Obviously those floors are not pretty but they are not all broke up either. I think alot of it has to do with the transition on to the concrete floor. If you are going to have to 'jump up' to get on the concrete I think eventually that would start to break up. Just my $.02
     
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  3. check

    check Senior Member

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    2 things that break slabs, weight and impact. If you don't use any padding to cushion the impact, you have both at once. I know a guy who always used boards when bringing crawlers over his 6" slab and never had a problem, then his hired help started bringing in crawlers without any padding and the slab broke in several places. After that it really went downhill.
     
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  4. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    Good drainage and a well compacted subgrade will make a big difference in the longevity of the slab.
    The size and amount of rebar does to.
     
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  5. Tugger2

    Tugger2 Senior Member

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    I have done a few slabs in shops over the years . Good ground prep, 5/8" rebar on a 12" grid ,min. 6" thickness and 35 mpa concrete have worked well even in some pretty heavy impact situations, never had a crack in my shop floor and we are pretty rough on it. Rails are ok , I have seen an iron powder additive done on some floors which is bullet proof .
     
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  6. grandpa

    grandpa Senior Member

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    Make sure your aprons to and from the main slab are at least 6 inch with plenty of rebar. My floor has held up, but the D8,s are cracking the apron and we,ve been using tires on the aprons and coveyor belting on the main floor.
     
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  7. 92U 3406

    92U 3406 Senior Member

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    Shop I work at half the bays have steel plates in the floor. I like it much better than the rubber belting the previous place had. Rubber is slippery as hell when it gets wet. The steel isn't actually that bad once it gets rusted and roughed up a bit. Just gotta watch for sharp spots in the steel from ice lugs. We just toss down 3 or 4 tires per track on the concrete transition from dirt to steel.
     
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  8. Zewnten

    Zewnten Well-Known Member

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    I'd put in a gutter to an oil water separator for bringing in wet/snowed on machines
     
  9. earthscratcher

    earthscratcher Senior Member

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    i have not seen a oil/water separator before, more info on that? checking on this iron powder stuff any recommendations.hope to start pouring in a month.also planning on a free standing 3 ton jib crane who has prepped a floor for one of these?
     
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  10. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Check with your local concrete finishers on the powdered iron, it is a Royal BIOTCH to mag down and finish out, once hardened it is also a MAJOR PITA to do anything else with especially cutting out. Will wear like steel plate chips just ever so slightly, and watched one floor at a previous shop turn rust brown when washed down.
     
  11. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    I'm not sure if Zewnten had a premade oil seperator in mind or what. A sump pit where the drain inlet is a foot below the surface (like a sewer gas trap) will hold that foot of oil before any passes into the drain.
     
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  12. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    My poor little brain is confused. With the oil floating on top of the water how do you get the water out without the oil going first. Sounds cool but I can not picture what it looks like.
     
  13. grandpa

    grandpa Senior Member

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    Its code here in Minny on a commercial building to have the waste oil trap. Its a steel tank that your water drains are tied to. It has a baffle going down so as not to allow the oil to escape. Gotta pump them every so often.
     
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  14. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    Just like a septic tank where the scum is blocked from the outlet. The drain pipe enters the side but goes down a foot or so, so that the trap stays full to a certain level, and the water is drawn off below the surface.
     
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  15. terex herder

    terex herder Well-Known Member

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    I have a 4 ton 20' jib. I called the factory and got their installation specifications. Mine is a sleeve mount. The floor is usable right up to the 24" pillar. The sleeve is 25" inside diameter to allow for final plumb of the pillar, and there is a collar welded around the top of the sleeve and the pillar.

    The sleeve is 5' deep, and is mounted on a 12" rat slab. The bottom of the sleeve had a 28" square x 5/8 thick steel plate. We embedded threaded rod in the rat slab for holes in the corners of the square. This held the slab down and insured perfect plumb. Even though the sleeve weighed about 1200#, it was about 800# buoyant when surrounded by concrete.

    IIRC, the factory wanted an 8' square hole when unsupported by the slab. Mine is a monolithic pour with the floor, so I went with a 6' square hole.

    The pillar had to be set before the rafters.

    It took a 22' eve to get 15' under the hook, and I still had to move the pillar from where I wanted it so it would clear the eaves haunch on the rafter.
     
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  16. earthscratcher

    earthscratcher Senior Member

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    sounds like a nice jib setup terex herder, so on the water oil separator if i wanted to make a gravity fed used oil tank that is under ground,could i just use a small septic tank, has anybody did this.used oil is such a pain in the but. i just need to make sure to get all these chases, drains,reinforced pads in place. still not sure on airlines would like everything to be under slab?
     
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  17. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Duh. Now I get it. The old bent pipe trick. The oil stays on top. Easy enough.
     
  18. DARO

    DARO Well-Known Member

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    On the oil trap. A must have is a clean out that points back to the tank. When the elbow under oil and water plugs up you dont wanna have to be one of the guys drawing straws to see who gets to reach down there to put the snake in......
     
  19. DARO

    DARO Well-Known Member

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    The clean out in Orange is what i am referrig to. If you only have them pointing towards the tank. When you have a plug in th elbow some one is gonna get a little soggy. 15541740047831101055183.jpg 15541740047831101055183.jpg
     
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  20. DARO

    DARO Well-Known Member

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    Opps... same pic twice..