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Coast Logger

Discussion in 'Forestry Equipment' started by VI TL, Feb 22, 2020.

  1. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Seaspan Forester at Rennell Sound
     

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  2. 59 North

    59 North Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2021
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    Location:
    Alaska
    Recent pictures?
    If I recall correctly, this tug and barge picked up logs here in Alaska sometime in the '90s.
    Quite the barge, very impressive how it handled loading cargo.
     
  3. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    These pictures from the late '70s.
     
  4. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Mighty Mite at Rennell Sound. Had one of these at all company camps. Used for bridge ties and planks, for projects around camp and for shovel mats in the old days.
     

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  5. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Pushing loads off with FE loader after A-frame lowered and dry sort construction not completed.
     

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  6. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Building dry sort at Rennell Sound. Rock was hauled from a blasted quarry less than a mile away. This rock was used to make the outer walls of the sort. Shale rock, which was on site, was pushed in by dozer to make the inside of the sort and the surface. The shale made a great surface and when it was needed to redo the surface only had scrape off the top and push on another layer of shale. There was shale everywhere near the beach and up the adjoining hills. A lot of the mainline was capped with shale and in the summer created a smooth fast road if it was graded before it got too hard. During the oil crisis in the 70’s there was talk of getting oil from the shale. Never happened.
     

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  7. Jumbo

    Jumbo Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2010
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    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Black Diamond WA
    My only experience with shale was not good. A place called Lake Hannon near Monroe Washington about 1976 or so. The pit for rocking the road was all shale, razor sharp shale. we went through 3-4 tires a day on every single gravel truck out there. There was one day that the loader, all four gravel trucks and the tire truck were all laid up with flats. We finally got the road capped with some crushed and it held up pretty good. Later though, when I was hauling logs out of there, they grid rolled the road and turned up all the shale again. It is pretty discouraging to see the crummy, three log trucks and again the tire truck all laid up with flats. the foreman of the gravel trucks was not too bright and he got hauled over the coals for the stunt. Didn't get fired though, his dad was a well respected man (with good reason) and they didn't want to let him know he had sired a real dud.
     
  8. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    That was a bad experience. The shale at Rennell was somewhat soft and did not hold sharp edges. Traffic created a lot of fines and that formed a hard surface on top when dry. Next best thing to paving or cement for the dry sort. Worked well on the roads also. No flats, at least not from the shale.
     
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  9. camptramp

    camptramp Senior Member

    Joined:
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    5,124
    Occupation:
    Retired Logger Retired Part time pebble hauler
    Location:
    The warm land on Vancuver Island
    Shale / Slate rock formations can be a blessing or a curse . If its soft and rotten , it turns into ruts in the wheel tracks and grease under the tires to pull adverse grades in rainy season . if its hard at the point of turning into slate , it makes a good road base . If it turns into hard slate it makes a good road , but the tire bill goes through the roof ! I ran an American 599 at Sooke one Winter . The under carriage was getting pretty well worn out . The roads were in an area made of a shale rock formation , the ruts got so bad that when the weather turned cold and froze , to move from landing to the next landing we had to lowbed the loader as the tracks would not stay on it .
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2021
  10. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    Location:
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    yes there is a sweet spot with shale. On the dam job, we had some rotten rock. It had too high a sulfur content. There were big veins of it we could dig with an excavator, and it was bad news on roads. We also had yellow pumice from the mountain that was like Captain Crunch cereal. Somehow it got trapped below a soil layer and when i got on it stripping, i could get it out clean. If you put it on a footpath it would always float to the top in winter and stay clean.
     
  11. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Dry sort in use. Clark FE loader, Husby truck. Water pooled in places but did not turn the sort into a mud pit.
     

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  12. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    7220 loading Husby Mack - Rennell Sound
     

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  13. Born2clearcut

    Born2clearcut Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Sunshine Coast B C
    My last time to the backend ( fingers crossed)
     

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  14. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    Best of luck in your retirement!
     
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  15. VI TL

    VI TL Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 2020
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    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Rennell Sound
     

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