1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Wheeled loaders VS Tracked loaders

Discussion in 'Wheel Loaders' started by lonkinggroup, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. lonkinggroup

    lonkinggroup Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2012
    Messages:
    94
    Location:
    china
    When people talking about loaders, the first image pop up is the wheeled one. And to be honest, i haven't see a tracked one in the real life. I have a question here, if wheeled loaders are so popular and frequently used, why we need the tracked ones? Is something special about it, such as its functions that the wheeled ones don't have ?
     
  2. DirtHauler

    DirtHauler Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Messages:
    507
    Occupation:
    Heavy Highway Dirt Hauler
    Location:
    Seattle WA
    A tracked loader is much more versatile machine than a wheeled loader. That being said, a wheeled loader is much better at what it does than a tracked loader in most applications. Track loaders don't get flat tires thus in applications like demo and shot rock quarries they are more bulletproof. Track loaders probably have more in common as far as application with a skid steer than a wheeled loader these days.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2012
  3. j.r.

    j.r. Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2010
    Messages:
    41
    Occupation:
    hoe operator
    Location:
    baltimore
    when your in the mud a wheel loader wont cut it
     
  4. TCS

    TCS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    76
    Location:
    ct
    In today's construction venue track loaders are far more use specific than they used to be due to the dramatic increase in cost per cycle compared to a wheel loader. While a track loader may seem more durable the truth is quite different,because from the moment the tracks move they begin to wear out at a far greater rate than a wheel loader. Consequently,track machines are now usually used only when they are needed and where a wheeled machine would not be able to do the job.
     
  5. big ben

    big ben Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    337
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    They have applications they excel at. Landfills love them because they have floatation and a bucket. Steel mills because you wont burn off a tire. Water and sewer companies because the are basically a skid steer and can get in tight areas, fast, have a good size bucket and turn on a dime.
     
  6. Mike Van

    Mike Van Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    210
    Location:
    Kent Ct.
    You can drive a wheel loader on the highway if need be [not an interstate of course] A track loader will need a pretty subatantial truck & trailer to move anywhere.
     
  7. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2008
    Messages:
    12,701
    Occupation:
    Service Manager
    Location:
    Knoxville TN
    I don't think it's an honest comparison wheel vs track loader. Both have applications where they excel, neither will replace the other very well in their respective applications.
     
  8. 250c

    250c Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2011
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Gatesville Tx
    I'm with atco on this. I own both and they each have their strong and weak points.
     
  9. rabia

    rabia Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2012
    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    US
    tracked loaders are good then wheeled loaders they worked in a very versatile way
     
  10. ih100

    ih100 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Messages:
    713
    Location:
    Peterborough UK
    In the UK there is very little overlap between how wheeled and tracked loaders are used. Most ttl's in the uk have a 4 in 1 fitted, and until recently there was more overlap with small dozers, both being used for grading, trimming, landscaping, topsoil strip, etc. The dozer boys won't admit it, but there are a lot of jobs where a TTL is much faster and versatile.

    TCS, agree up to a point, but once you've torn a couple of tyres out on a medium sized wheeled loader, a set of tracks doesn't look quite as expensive.
     
  11. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,481
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair . . . interesting thread. I don't know a lot about loader/truck operations but I was watching a track loader just loading out of a pile and it seems to me that a lot of track wear could be alleviated by correct positioning of the trucks.

    It might be just me again being critical but in truth I thought the operation was a disorganised shambles . . . no fault of the machine of course.

    Cheers.
     
  12. ih100

    ih100 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Messages:
    713
    Location:
    Peterborough UK
    Lost art, Scrub. Take notice how many "operators" spend all day doing spot turns when loading in a twenty acre field. That's why ttl's get such a bad press on track wear. When they had clutch and brake steer the tracks lasted so much longer. We had a b100 on the farm and the tracks lasted 30 years, obviously not everyday use, but about 250 hrs a year, so about 7500 hrs, probably more.

    Another thing, a modern ttl's power is it's own worst enemy, when you get hot shots spending all day showing how fast they can "operate" and how much they can screw the tracks round.