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Welding on Cat shear

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by typ4, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. typ4

    typ4 Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2010
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    Occupation:
    Equipment mechanic for a small company.
    Location:
    oregon
    So we took the broken jaw to a shop in vancouver and they sent in a piece of it and it is just T1 steel. I thought it would be better than that. They are going to price out a repair using an alloy called hardox I think he said.
     
  2. NL1CAT

    NL1CAT Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    131
    Occupation:
    Operator
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Hardox is wear steel used on cutting edges .
    I don't think a jaw made of that will last very long.
    You must be careful with the shear when its cold ,especially with the sting.
    Make sure you warm it up a bit with some thin metal to cut.
    Btw. Verachtert is dutch http://www.veraned.nl/en
     
  3. typ4

    typ4 Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2010
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    Occupation:
    Equipment mechanic for a small company.
    Location:
    oregon
    So the price is really close to a new jaw, I talked with a machinist/metalurgist and he said just weld it up and see how long it lasts. Gave me some good tips on pre/post heat and so on.
     
  4. Turbo21835

    Turbo21835 Senior Member

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    Road Dog
    One thing you need to understand about shears, almost everything on them is a wear item. When I worked large demo projects, we had 2 welders for roughly 25 machines. They spent every night welding on something, or replacing blades. Every two weeks they made sure to go over each attachment, be it grapple, or shear. Always checking for cracks, repairing the little cracks before they got big. Adding wear metal to the shears. A few times a year a manufacturers rep would come out and go over things as well. He would also assist with major repairs. Your biggest ally is and educated operator who knows what to watch for. Go over things with the guys, let them know what to look out for, and catch it before its a major issue.
     
  5. typ4

    typ4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Equipment mechanic for a small company.
    Location:
    oregon
    So an update, the jaw on the other shear broke yesterday in the same place, maybe they will stay the hell out of the concrete now. Now the job owner knows why demolition companys charge so much for the work.
     
  6. typ4

    typ4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Messages:
    226
    Occupation:
    Equipment mechanic for a small company.
    Location:
    oregon
    So to lee online, How do I get a print of how the jaw is made? We are going to make a new piece for it and It would be nice to know how its built before we cut it apart.