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Tool Talk

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by Flat Thunder Channel, May 7, 2020.

  1. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    How many hundreds for the tools and how long does the battery last? Cordless is great but sometimes cost prohibitive. I needed a circular saw for a very small project. Cordless would have been great but the battery alone was more than a basic corded saw. I lucked out and got an open box circular saw at a 50% discount for $32.98. It will run all day and do any future projects I have. No way to justify over $200 to go cordless.
     
  2. stinky64

    stinky64 Senior Member

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    Feb 25, 2017
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    Occupation:
    big truck wrench/fixer of things
    Location:
    java center ny
    When I was just a little shaver before wrenching on/driving trucks I did new home construction/remodeling and milwaukee corded saws were the norm but then I got turned on to the light weight makita corded circular saws,they were a game changer and very reliable even when dropped from the second floor deck depending on how they bounced:rolleyes:Now that I'm (retired) the nail slammin' jobs are coming out of the woodwork due to the pi$$poor state of the work force and when I show up on the job I have my Makitas and a 28 oz.estwing hammer hanging from my pouch they know I'm there to work....and I always bring a couple of good quality cords with as well..
     
  3. Camshawn

    Camshawn Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Langley BC
    In my shop, I mostly use the corded grinders and saws. They hang on a stand and the power is right there. The skil saw and corded drills are right in a drawer ready to pull out. If I need to move away from my central work area or just need one cut or screw driven, I take cordless tools. Cam
     
    stinky64 and John C. like this.
  4. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    Most bare tools like grinder, grease gun, etc are around $200. Combo with 2 drills, circular saw, recip saw, radio, and 2 2.0 amp batteries use to be under $400 though. The 5 amp hour last forever in virtually anything. The only thing that burns them up quick is the chainsaw but if I take 2-3 can do a ton of cutting.
     
  5. aighead

    aighead Senior Member

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    I got the Milwaukee circ saw for about 130 bucks, tool only, as I had the battery that came with the grease gun and I'd bought an extra because I was too dumb to figure out how to plug the first battery in all the way. I used the saw a couple times this weekend. When I pulled it out of the box and got the blade on and all that junk, I fired it up and was disappointed. It sounded like a kids play-saw. It didn't seem to spin the blade very fast and I was curious if the battery, which was on the unplugged charger for a while, was running low. I didn't feel like dragging a couple hundred feet of extension cord out, and I just bought this new toy, so I took it out and I'll be dogged if it didn't slice right through the 2x10s I've got! Very well done, and quiet! It was weird.

    New tool again! I got an inexpensive Craftsman angle grinder. My last one was a HF cheapo, and it's ergonomics left a bit to be desired. I've yet to use it but it seems like, with a trigger trigger instead of switch, I think I'll like that a bunch more. I also got a grinding wheel rather than using a cutoff wheel to grind. I don't think I realized there was a difference, but that makes sense, duh.
     
  6. 1466IH

    1466IH Senior Member

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    Location:
    prairie du rocher, il
    I have a lot of m12 and M18 tools and batteries and use the hell out of them in the service truck but in the shop I still prefer air. Especially for grinding/cutting. I know it's probably not that big of a deal but with all of the magnets and fans in corded/cordless tools I just can't help but think that metal shavings aren't real good for them.
     
    stinky64, aighead and Camshawn like this.
  7. colson04

    colson04 Senior Member

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    Needed a big saw, but I couldn't justify buying a Stihl or Husqvarna. I've run an old Homelite 540 and a 410 for awhile, but they're getting tired and parts are scarce. I've seen these clone 660s around for a few years and finally ordered one up.

    20220424_211152.jpg

    Dressed with a 32" Oregon bar, skip tooth, full chisel chain. I put a tank through it today on some large white oak that was bigger than the bar. I don't know how the performance compares to a true 660, but this saw flat ripped through that oak today. I am plenty happy with it so far. Let me get a few tanks through it and I'll report back. Tomorrow it is scheduled to break down 2 more 30" plus white oaks, a 30" locust, 32" walnut, and a 36" sugar maple. The walnut and maple are standing dead, rest are hazard trees that need to go.
     
  8. 673moto

    673moto Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Slacker
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    NorCal
    You’re right about that... I have a few 18v grinders in the tool graveyard... brushed and brushless variety... they can’t withstand metal dust
     
    John C. likes this.
  9. 1466IH

    1466IH Senior Member

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    Location:
    prairie du rocher, il
    Short of the compressor flying apart there is no where for dirt/debris to enter an air tool and they are easily rebuilt. If I am doing a big project in the field I will use air but with a pto driven compressor it gets old listening to the truck all day. Not to mention the ridiculous fuel prices now and general wear and tear from idling.
     
    John C. likes this.
  10. aighead

    aighead Senior Member

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    Nice, colson! Can I ask what something like that ran you? I'd love to get a bigger saw for a chainsaw mill but the 500 bucks was already plenty for my Husq 455, which isn't big enough. You got good plans for all that wood?
     
  11. Flat Thunder Channel

    Flat Thunder Channel Senior Member

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    Location:
    Ohio
    I sware off cheap tool barn angle grinders back in the traveling tool tent days. This was before harbor freight existed. Then you could buy a 4 1/2" angle grinder for $10. After the last one I tried to use ate the bearings and started throwing sharapnel I gave up on knockoff imports. I think at the time I went through multiple units on a simple job. I was pissed! :mad:

    Now I only buy name brand units, but they are not the quality they used to be. Ironically I think some of those are all import now too, but with a fancy cover/sticker. I need to spend the money for a Metabo. Those are industrial units in my opinion.

    Try flap disc grinding wheels. They will blow your mind!
     
    aighead likes this.
  12. aighead

    aighead Senior Member

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    Thanks FTC, I saw some of those but didn't get any. I was too shocked by the $17 cutoff wheel 5 pack. My uses are minimal so I haven't needed anything too robust but the more welding I get into the more I seem to need it.
     
    Flat Thunder Channel likes this.
  13. Old Doug

    Old Doug Senior Member

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    Cordless is great but they are high . I use a sawzall alot junking cars and its very hard on one. I have thought alot about burying a line so i could have a plug in were i load stuff. I guess it all comes down to how much do you want to spend to get something done.
     
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  14. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Mar 11, 2012
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    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    My little Homelite Super2's would run and hide from that one!

    Then again the only tree near me that would need that big of a bar is a large Poplar and from my experience with that is it burns so fast it's hardly worth the time it take to cut and split! Also if you don't split it fast it will rot from the inside!
     
  15. Old Doug

    Old Doug Senior Member

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    I found one of those super 2s in a trash can it had a broken part that held the bar i fixed it . I had alot of fence row to clear i bought a new Stihl 034 . I was cutting the trees and skiding them to a ditch. I ended up using the Homelite because i ether had to haul the saw on the tractor or leave it along the fence row. After it gave out years later i got a poulan. You can say bad stuff about cheap saws but they are great for what they are.
     
    Flat Thunder Channel likes this.
  16. colson04

    colson04 Senior Member

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    @aighead , search Ebay for a G660 chainsaw. Another option would be a G466. Those are clones of Stihl 660 (92cc) and 460 (76cc). I would have loved to have bought a Stihl original, but a new 92cc Stihl is over $1300, and a used ones are $500 to $1000 with unknown history (cut one log, only used on Sunday's by a lil ol gramma, etc)

    So far, it's getting the job done. The powerhead was $360, the bar was $90, and the chain was around $30. It ripped through oak and walnut with ease, as it should. I had the full bar buried in that white oak and the 660 just powered right through.
     
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  17. MarshallPowerGen

    MarshallPowerGen Senior Member

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    Nov 26, 2017
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    Occupation:
    Generator & Equipment Mechanic
    Location:
    NW USA
    Farmertec.com is where my friend showed me for the "Repair Kits" to build your own saw. He was interested in building one for a project, and got me interested to do the same.
     
    colson04 and aighead like this.
  18. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    If you expect to have more projects that can justify the cost then cordless could be worthwhile. Air die grinders are nice because they are smaller but you still need a decent compressor. I know a few guys that several of the cheap imports, $20-$30. They don't last very long but are cheap to replace. Name brands are much better... if the shop supplies them. I worked in one shop where they wanted you to supply your own grinders. It's pretty rare a welding shop doesn't supply the power tools. Buying a $20 die grinder because the shop is too cheap to get one is one thing but with a grinder you need a name brand if you expect to last more than a week.
     
  19. aighead

    aighead Senior Member

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    Lots of stuff there MarshallPowerGen, thanks for sharing.

    Anyone use one of those bump chainsaw chain sharpeners? The kind the you stick your tip into then push, and supposedly it sharpens pretty nicely? The one linked is less than 5 bucks, which makes me want to try it but I haven't seen anyone talk about it so I assume it can't be great.
     
  20. colson04

    colson04 Senior Member

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    Delton, Michigan
    Great way to ruin a chain.

    Learn to hand file. After a long day churning out chips, it can be a very peaceful way to wind down with some tunes and a cold beverage. Only takes a few strokes per cutter. I usually give every cutter a couple strokes when I fuel up, or if I notice the chips are getting smaller/dusty. Then, end of day, I try to get through each saw. Sharpen chain, blow out air filter, clean off any excess oil, check & file rakers if needed, grease bar tip sprocket, etc. I have 2 saws that get used a lot, 3 others that are lightly used, so I'm really focusing on the 2.

    Also, I have an Oregon bench mounted chain grinder. That's mostly used to reshape chains that got rocked, or buried in the ground by the hired hand. But, if you're into milling, it can be used to reshape standard chains into milling chains.
     
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