1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Tips For a New Dozer Operator?

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by BellB25C, May 27, 2015.

  1. BellB25C

    BellB25C Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Canada
    Hi,

    I recently got a job arranged for later this summer to be running an old Cat D7E pulling a breaking disc for my uncle. I don't think that it will be much blade work, just plowing down new ground with a big disc harrow. I've run excavators and loaders for short periods of time and I know equipment pretty well, but this will be my first big job and my first time running a dozer. Does anyone have any tips on how to not look like a total rookie out there? I am specifically looking for advice on D-7E operating tips and breaking disc tips.

    Thanks!
     
  2. kevin37b

    kevin37b Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Messages:
    145
    Occupation:
    Operator #841
    Location:
    illinois
    Your uncle will give you the info !
     
  3. pafarmer

    pafarmer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    883
    Occupation:
    Land clearing, demo, site prep etc. Ex Pro Motocro
    Location:
    Somewhere in the woods !
    Wake up early, go to bed late, hardwork in between both of those..and NO ******** .....
     
  4. lowbed driver

    lowbed driver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    145
    Location:
    Northwest B.C

    Yup, +1 , especially if you start costing him money, he will tune you up. Thaty is my tip, listen to the old timers that is how I got to be a decent cat skinner when I was running dozers. Listen,listen,listen and keep the eyes open as well, watch what they do. And don't think you are going to do it as fast as them. Speed is no magic it comes with experience.
    Cheers LD
     
  5. qball

    qball Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,072
    Occupation:
    local 150 operator
    Location:
    il
    Don't turn sharp!
     
  6. Oxbow

    Oxbow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    859
    Location:
    Idaho
    Get in the habit of checking the engine oil, hydraulic oil and coolant every morning before start up, and check transmission oil and engine oil again before shut down. Clean your track frame out at the end of the day, and learn where all the grease fittings are - especially swing frame zerks.

    I know this is not the info you were looking for, but these habits are soon to be forgotten by the newer machinery that checks the fluid levels when you turn the key on. The problem is that you don't get a chance to get under the machine and look around for anything that might be amiss when the computer does all of this for you.
     
  7. BellB25C

    BellB25C Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Canada
    Thanks for the tips! Do dozers need to be greased as often as excavators? Just wondering what that procedure is like.
     
  8. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,480
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair . . . .

    BellB25c. Oxbow raised some very good points. fluid levels must be checked before start up and (in my crew) were normally topped up if needed at the lunch break.

    Also mandatory at the lunch break was greasing, changing air filters and, most important a crawl through underneath with eves wide open looking for loose bolts on belly-plates, rollers rock guards and so and oil drips from belly plates or leaking rollers.

    Put a hand on each roller cap checking for heat, same with idler bosses. Check them and notice any aberrations . . . the front rollers will normally be hotter but they shouldn't burn your hand.

    As far as the actual operation goes try and develop smoothness. Remember where the needles sit on the gauges once it gets up to operating temperature and watch them like a hawk and keep sniffing out for hot or different smells.

    If it has a manual transmission never let it idle in gear . . . put both sticks into neutral and reengage the clutch.

    Steering clutches should be fully engaged or fully disengaged. Never try to slip them and at all costs avoid "sling shotting".

    This can occur when you try to turn pulling heavy with a plough . . . that is to say you pull one clutch and instead of turning the other track loses traction and just spins. Hit decel, disengage master clutch or flick powershift into neutral, release steering clutch and then start off and try again.

    All the best and enjoy yourself.

    Cheers.
     
  9. BellB25C

    BellB25C Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Canada
    Thanks for the advice on the steering clutches. Are you supposed to operate the steering clutches as you would a clutch on a manual transmission, IE, letting them slowly back in as to not to jerk them? Or is it fine to just pull them quickly to keep from slipping them?
     
  10. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,480
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair . . .

    BellB25c . Just one smooth movement in or out works fine . . . and its always clutch disengaged and then foot on brake.

    Cheers.
     
  11. gradetracy

    gradetracy New Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    NY
    Nice info here, thanks :)
     
  12. Don k

    Don k Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Messages:
    195
    Location:
    bandera, tx.
    And one more thing that to me is very important is if it starts to make a different noise stop right away and find the cause.
     
  13. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,480
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair . . .

    Don k

    Good one mate! this is most important, I knew there was something I'd missed. (big grin)

    Cheers.
     
  14. Oxbow

    Oxbow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    859
    Location:
    Idaho
    Scrub, I am now embarrassed that I failed to include so many points that you brought up. Especially making sure to engage the clutch with transmission in neutral when idling.

    BellB25C, as Scrub said, your nose and ears play probably the biggest part of detecting when something is wrong. After you are acquainted with the machine you will be able to detect changes in noise, and smell problems.
     
  15. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,480
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair . . . Oxbow .

    How things have changed.

    I just put all that stuff in there as to how we used to do things. I suppose some folks still work the same but it seems to me (I could be wrong) that it is not so common now for operators to religiously check fluid levels and do under tractor inspections.

    One of the things I dislike on any of the later model machines I have been on was there was no provision to wind them over with the fuel off to prevent starting.

    It may not be so prevalent with modern engines but in the old days there was always the possibility of a dripping injector or a cracked head/gasket failure allowing fuel or water to get into a cylinder.

    This obviously could be catastrophic and the old way was to always "bump them over" and then give them a whirl before admitting fuel.

    In my working life this procedure probably saved five or six engines and I have known of several others that hydrauliced at start up with dire consequences . . . one of the automatic "fails" on getting power station ticket was not to bar an engine over to check for locking.

    I can imagine that in these days of heavy metal or country rock in the headphones and cool/heated air circulating in cabs
    sounds and smells of problems may well go undetected.

    I know I am speaking of a different style of machine and computers showing fluid levels and doing diagnostics are all vey well but I believe there is nothing quite like the human sense of smell and sound and touch. (big grin)


    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2015
  16. 390eric

    390eric Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    274
    Location:
    pittsburgh PA
    Scrub, You talk about hearing and smelling. I know my machines and I hear those odd sounds and if something is different. One day the dozer I was running sounded different. Said to the boss at lunch something sounds different just doesn't seem right. He looked at me dumbfounded, like I was drunk. Well within an hour the turbo came apart. Once you have spent enough hours on something you can tell when something is different. And that was in an ac radio enclosed cab.
     
  17. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,480
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair . . .

    390eric. Yes, that's what I mean exactly. That's one of the reasons why I reckon its always best when possible to keep designated operators on given machines or trucks.

    It can take a few shifts to get to know a machine and learn its little foibles. I worked once for a scraper outfit where you just climbed onto anything that was warmed up and ready and felt I had no connection or affinity with the machines for some weeks because I was on a different one every day.

    I opted for an old stiff hitch 27, nobody liked it, she was a bit giggle headed in the steering and wasn't expected to stay with the new stuff but I ran her for months almost trouble free and we became the best of friends.

    Cheers.