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Stretching a float

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by watglen, Feb 27, 2018.

  1. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    I have a Rogers detachable gooseneck 50T float.

    Is it possible to lengthen the deck by a couple feet? Anybody ever do that?
     
  2. redneckracin

    redneckracin Senior Member

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    Anything is possible, would I want the liability? Nope, Have you looked at trading or buying the trailer that you need?
     
  3. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    I suppose it becomes a cost thing. It may be cheaper to trade the float.

    Seems like every time I get a new float, it becomes too small quickly.
     
  4. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    10-wide&insley 001[1].jpg Reckon ya have to weigh out the cost & need of the longer trailer frame .

    I have went the opposite ....... Bought an old 10 wide that was long & low .

    Liked the trailer & price but the long & low specs were not going to work well in my terrain .

    We cut out a 4 foot section of the deck and modified the gooseneck so now it's shorter and a little taller in the front . Now she can handle narrow roads & rail road crossings .:)
     
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  5. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    It's done all the time, usually with a pin joint and a short deck extension. It can also be done without the pin joint, just cut, add desired length and weld it back up. The bottom flange is the critical one. For sure needs strapped. I've done quite a few inserts, pin joints etc over the years. There are a few tricks to working with T-1. If you had a competent shop do the work with correct material I'd expect to pay $4-5k to add about 4'. Fair amount of time getting it done right.
     
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  6. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    Do you normally add it near the end of the deck or in the middle? Seems like near the front end would be easiest and strongest
     
  7. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    Usually they're done at the rear near the transition from deck to wheel area. Some shops and manufacturers have experimented with additions on the front but they don't seem to work too slick. 99% of the additions and pin joints are at or near the transition.

    How long is the well currently?
     
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  8. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    Right now the well is 22'. I think 24' will be enough. Waiting for machine(load) to show up to get a better idea.