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Replacing hoses 1845C

Discussion in 'Skid Steers' started by Joel59, Oct 7, 2019.

  1. Joel59

    Joel59 Well-Known Member

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    I am in the process of changing out the two drive motor to tandem pump hoses on the left side of my Case 1845C. It is an early model with the planetaries. I have read online about the importance of cleanliness, and taken the appropriate precautions. I have been dreading changing these out (I knew the metal cords were showing on the old hoses) because of the horror stories about contaminating this closed loop system. Is there any special advice that anyone can give me in order to help me steer clear of any problems? Blow out the new hoses with air? Is there any need to bleed anything after installing the new hoses? Any other advice? Thanks.
     
  2. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    The metal cords on the outside won't contaminate the system. Better hose shops will blow a foam plug through the hoses to clean them and it wouldn't hurt to blow air through them. Clean everything off really good before you take the hoses off and cap the motor and pump ports. Make sure the new hoses have caps on them and don't take them off until they are in position ready to install. I replaced a wheel motor in my skid steer (and drained the fluid) and they recommend turning the engine over without starting for a about 15 seconds, waiting a minute and doing it again. Do this a few times and you should be OK. My machine is not a Case but Case may have a different procedure and you don't have to drain the hydraulics just to change the hoses. I drained the hyd's. in case the leaking motor put contamination in the system.
     
  3. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    We usually blow brake clean or solvent through new hoses just as a precaution. Also wash any fittings you’re going to disconnect off as well and keep an eye on them as you’re un turning for dirt you didn’t get initially. Clean to surrounding area so no dirt can fall in from above or around the area.
     
  4. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    The foam projectiles are the best way to clean hoses.

     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
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  5. Joel59

    Joel59 Well-Known Member

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    Wow. Yes, that's quite a fancy hose shop there! I doubt most of the hose shops around are so particular.
     
  6. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    That was just a short video I found but the foam plugs for cleaning are common in better hose shops. Ask before you have the hoses made how they clean them.
     
  7. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    Agreed about the foam bullets.

    Still like to flush them though
     
  8. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Would need to make sure brake clean or solvent wouldn't compromise the hose or contaminate the hydraulics. It would also attract any dust or dirt in that was missed or fell from somewhere.
     
  9. DB2

    DB2 Senior Member

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    Should have added to blow the hose dry after with compressed air. This should get rid of any residual fluid.
    Done dozens of hoses this way and never a problem.
     
  10. sims

    sims Well-Known Member

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    I'm also in the brake clean and compressed air camp. I think the most important cleaning should take place before disassembly. If your 1845c is anything like mine the bottom pan is a collection of oily leaves, sticks and dirt. I tilt the machine and pressure wash the crud out the back. Then after everything is dried off, I hit the fittings with brake clean (top, bottom, all around) before I open up anything.
    I've changed those drive motor hoses; be sure to break out every big open end wrench and crow's foot you own. Good luck.

    SimS
     
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  11. Joel59

    Joel59 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, guys. It sounds like I'm on the right track. I pressure washed all the crud out, wire brushed and brake cleaned the fittings, carefully removed the hoses and capped the ports. Sounds like my hose shop just blows out the new hoses, so I will brake clean and blow them out good before refitting. Thanks again.
     
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  12. Joel59

    Joel59 Well-Known Member

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    Just as a follow up, I got the new hoses on yesterday. I followed the above instructions- cleanliness, brake cleaner in hoses, compressed air. Assembled it all and used the machine a few hours last night. All is good. Thanks for the advice, guys.
     
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