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Can't keep tires on trailer

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by suladas, Feb 16, 2020.

  1. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    Only been 14ish months with new trailer, and i've already ran through 5 tires with it and getting fed up. One through sidewall unfixable, one fixable, one sidewall got a 1" circle bulge so garbage, and 2 others that weren't the trailers/tires fault. But I can't help but think it seems odd 3 years with my 10,000lb axle tandem I had ONE flat and a little over a year and 3 with this trailer? 50% of the time of so the tires are loaded right up to capacity but they wear fine, problem is they don't get to the point of wearing before i'm replacing them.

    Would heavier F or G tires help? 17.5s? Comparing how tough the sidewalls are compared to my 17.5 (over 2 years now and not ever a flat on that trailer either), and i'd think they'd have to stand up better? Although I know they aren't cheap, but neither is always changing tires.
     
  2. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    What brands?
     
  3. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    It's been my experience with tires that you get what you pay for. I've always run really heavy duty tires on my one ton trucks (Toyo M55s) and just got my first flat in 30 years of using them. A nail no less.
     
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  4. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    What size are you running now?
     
  5. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    Size can matter low pro tires are more prone to sidewall issues than standard tires
     
  6. highwayghost

    highwayghost Senior Member

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    Get as heavy a weight rating as you can. They undoubtedly be more expensive at first but figure in the time you get out of them and it will be worth it. Recently had a run of trailer tire failures(3), in as many months. Only about 4 years old, half worn. 6 ply came with trailer. Tread can off the casings. I put on 10 ply. I was told that no trailer tires are American made anymore.
     
  7. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    They are 235/80R16. The replacements i've been buying are Carlisle, the originals I don't remember but it wasn't a really known brand. They are only rated for 3500ish a tire.

    I've seen ones rated for 3900, and 4400. I'm paying $170 for tire and rim, I seen Samson 4400lb ones with rim for $285, $265 for 3900lb Carlieles. If that saves me one flat it pays for itself. It cost me $40 to get tire fixed, never mind all the hassle.

    Would the 17.5's be that much better yet? Although i'm sure i'd be looking at about $350 each. I'd rather not spend nearly $2k on tires, I doubt i've put 7,000 miles on this trailer so far. But i've already bought 5 new tires.
     
  8. NepeanGC

    NepeanGC Well-Known Member

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    Carlises are absolute crap. I used to burn through cheapies like those at a ridiculous rate on my dump trailer and tandem equipment trailer.

    I'm a huge fan of Sailun S637 tires - great load capacity, only about 10$/ per tire more locally, and so far I'm at about 50k kms on the tires, where in the past I struggled to get 10-15k out of hem.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  9. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    That would be nice if it's just a matter of buying a better brand as these current ones go. They don't seem to be that good, one isn't more then a few months old and there is around a 1" round bulge in the sidewall. They seem to be worse then the one's the trailer came with.

    I've had really good luck with Saulun 17.5's on my heavy trailer and they aren't expensive.
     
  10. highwayghost

    highwayghost Senior Member

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    Another tip... be sure to run them at max PSI. Less side wall flex will make them run cooler.
     
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  11. Tags

    Tags Senior Member

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    I run the 235/80/16 load range G, could not keep load range E tires on it, a good pothole or if you even slighted rubbed a curb the sidewalks would blow when the trailer was loaded, no problem with the Gs, I'm only replacing them because when they're worn out
     
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  12. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    Like said above you get what you pay for. Steer tires {Bridgestone, Michelin}-Drop axle tires {Michelin} Drive tires {Bridgestone, Michelin} Trailer tires {Bridgestone}.
    With drop axle tires you don't want too many 32nd's of tire tread-it causes river run, I have seen Michelin 255/75 22.5's on drops make 250,000. And on three axle trailers
    running 295/75 22.5's Bridgestones will flat out last the rest. The worst part these days is finding virgin tires that are round.
     
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  13. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    17.5s are light years better than 16s if you stay 16 get the heaviest name brand that your tire dealer recommends quit buying the junk carlisles already mounted on rims thats the crap that they sell at Walmart or whatever the Canadian equivalent is
     
  14. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    Couldn't agree more-buying Carlisles is like buying buying Shinko tires for a motorcycle, one has a death wish if he buys Shinko's for his cycle.
     
  15. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    The part that shocked me was I got them from a trailer supply shop, I never bothered to pay much attention to brand, figured they would sell a quality brand. I will try staying with the 16's and as these current one's get destroyed replace them one at a time with better quality ones.
     
  16. Tenwheeler

    Tenwheeler Senior Member

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    Do not thank you will find 17.5 rims that will go in place of your 16s.
    6, 8, 10 ply really? Read on the tire " same as 8 ply - 4 tread 2 - side wall is common "
    On interstate trailers I am running GoodYear G614's. Cost about $280 for a 16. Firestone Transforce and Toyo are good locally.
    Do not like Sailuns. Have not been able to find Michelin or Bridgestone load G's when i needed them.
    Carlisles are made in at least three different countries, they are not all the same. Toyo is a Japanese company but I have found some heavy truck tires that were made in China.
    Used to use some 16 inch Michelin, Bridgestone and Yokahoma steel belted radials with thick sidewalls. Do not know if they are even made anymore. That is what I would want on a job site.
     
  17. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Did you buy my old trailer!!!?
    I had a 9 ton triaxle. Went through 12 tires in a few years of less than 500 miles per year. It was an obsolete size I could only find in Blue Star, a Chinese tire. Sold it, bought a Cam Superline 10 ton. A 2006 model year, the original tires were unworn, but cracked soon after I bought it. Put a new set of the heaviest American tires I could buy. So far so good.

    Old trailer it was always the sidewall that would blow. Trailer called for 100 PSI. Max pressure on the tire label was 110. Didn't seem to matter 100 or 110 they would blow a tire on every trip over 10 miles. Trailer.jpg
     
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  18. Mother Deuce

    Mother Deuce Senior Member

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    Buy quality tires once and eliminate downtime at the tire shop or worse downtime plus a road call. Tire failure that makes you unable to perform, is like setting fire to money in the driveway. Paying for two cheap tires plus the downtime makes quality rubber cheap. When I was an owner operator. Truck or trailer tire failure during billable work hours would flush the truck profit for at least 3 shifts if not the week. Especially if you had to replace the tire plus the labor or road call. If you have a driver in the truck add his or her wages to the profit loss. I hate poor quality tires.
     
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  19. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    We use to use Toyo's for steers but it got to where we had too many issues with the 177's. Away's back I had put a set on a rig and the driver complained of shake, those didn't even make
    2,500 miles, the run out was a little over 3/8". I loaded them up and took them to the LS shop-they went through 7 tires off the rack before they found two that were round on a spin balancer.
     
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  20. Mark13

    Mark13 Well-Known Member

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    https://simpletire.com/sailun-235-8...xfU-UmzkMvuKUuUz2SguF8--dFoKrYxoaAkiyEALw_wcB

    Look into these tires. Sailun S637. I ran all sorts of 10 ply trailer and light truck tires on my deck over trailer with dual tandem 10k axles. I switched to the Sailun tires about 1.5yrs ago and I wish I would have done it the day I bought the trailer. They're 110psi or 120psi tires, I run them at 90-95psi (my wheels aren't rated for 110+psi) and they still run cool, solid, and pull better then 10ply trailer tires. About 1.5yrs ago when I needed new trailer tires I spent about 8hrs doing research online, talking to friends, etc. A friend told me about the Sailun tires as I was going to pull the trigger on the expensive Goodyears. He's been running them for years, I figured I'd give them a try and so far I'm very happy with them. Certainly glad I didn't spend the large amount extra to get the Goodyear tires.