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automation good?

Discussion in 'Pavers' started by ironjunkie, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. ironjunkie

    ironjunkie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    133
    Location:
    Maine
    I'm new to paver automation, this week I attended a "class" by the Topcon guy. Then we did a little playing with some stone dust through the paver with a 27'? non contact ski with 4 sonic trackers on a Cat AP1000. Of course there was a problem with some wires, we're thinking on the paver (right) side so we couldn't run slope, only grade. I was not impressed. It did not come close to placing the depth that we set it for, keep in mind that this was all done under the eye of the factory rep/service tech. (so it was not us setting it up wrong) and he seemed to be satisfied with the outcome of this way too thin mat of stone dust that we had. It seems that the literature and language in their teaching materials provided, kept highlighting the benefits of the averaging ability of their system, that by nature and design is what the screed will do itself without a bunch of input from an over eager screw/wheel man, is it not? The other guys there at the class that had experience with this system said that they did like it. That same day of this class the Co. re surfaced a 600'+ bridge on the interstate, the local DOT requires an automated paver and the results were similar to our too thin stone dust trials back at the class. The bridge looks bad. I'm sure that there's a time and place for this automation just as there is a tool for every job, but......... what's your story & opinion?
     
  2. griz

    griz Active Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2009
    Messages:
    40
    Occupation:
    equipment technician
    Location:
    usa
    I setup lots of pavers and mills with moba and topcon,its the cats ass if it is setup right for (your machine) lots of little thing to look at,tp speeds,valves bb or phr,...4 trackers makes it (averging) not set depth. u can pm me any time will help anyone over the phone.
     
  3. Stcloudwrench

    Stcloudwrench New Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Saint Cloud, Fl.
    The company I work for has grade control on all the pavers and mills. We use topcon and Moba on both the pavers and mills with a great deal of success. i personally don't think there are any sercets, I think the personal who use the system must be comfortable using it which to me means they need to use enough that it becomes almost second nature.
    I keep a log book with the parameters for each machine in my service truck and that is one of the first things I check when I get a call for grade control issues. the care and storage of the system including cables are very important. I pinched cable that has a cut or shorted wire inside the outer jacket might not be that easy to see. since the outter jackets are very rugged and most are self coiling they can hide minor damage. More times than not it is something simple. I typically am with a crew at the start of a shift just for the by the ways and I a
    A maintained machine and system in the hands of a good crew can lay thousands of tons of mix without issue. You just have to use it to get good with it
    I am actually putting together a training program which will include pictures with narration and short movies to help train some of the new poeople we have. When it is all said and done I may post it on a webb site to help others. At this time I don't know all about the legal side