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Advice doing stupid s**t

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by watglen, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    I know this is a dumb idea, cringe worthy.

    This website seems to be a mecca for people doing these types of things, maybe there is a solution out there.
    The other day we broke a chain pulling the tile plow with a d6H. The 5/8" grade 100 hook broke and made a mess out of the grill on the tile plow. The good news is no one was hurt. Both cabs are well protected.

    Its the jerking on the chain that does the harm. The hook is rated for way more than the tractor can pull, unless you back up and get a run at it!

    So anyway, I know for sure there are others who have done the same thing. It there any good strategies for shock adsorbers out there?

    I have seen a tire do wonders in this situation. Pretty hard to lug a tire big enough to handle this around though.
     
  2. Vetech63

    Vetech63 Senior Member

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    Better to lug a big tire around than bury you or someone else without their head.;)
     
  3. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    How big a tire do you figure it would take? Truck tire? or one of the huge off road tires?
     
  4. Vetech63

    Vetech63 Senior Member

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    It depends on what your pulling on. I personally would use a large backhoe tire at a minimum.
     
  5. funwithfuel

    funwithfuel Senior Member

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    So , why is it you have to shock load the chain? Slow and steady . If you have to take a run at it to break it loose, maybe use shackles and a very tough sling/multiple slings of same length and capacity. Slings have a bit of give vs chains and cables.
    Just a thought
     
  6. 56wrench

    56wrench Well-Known Member

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    I agree. slow and gentle. jerking busts stuff. jerking is for those massive nylon recovery straps or ropes. the biggest ones are expensive but they work
     
  7. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    If you're considering using a tyre, something like a 20.5R25 from a small wheel loader or grader would probably do the job.
     
  8. redneckracin

    redneckracin Senior Member

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    I think I would use some amsteel blue. It hates sharp edges but it won't rocket pieces of metal around if it breaks. We used it underground in the coal mine because it drops when it breaks. I think the inch and a quarter stuff was rated at 100k breaking strength. I could easily carry 50' of it rolled up without breaking a sweat.
     
  9. tdrainage

    tdrainage Well-Known Member

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    Why not use your 6H with winch?
     
  10. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    If you don't have enough drawbar pull for slow and smooth, you need to be using rope that can stretch. As a bonus, unless a shackle breaks there is no metal to launch into low-earth orbit if something fails. https://www.bubbarope.com/extreme-bubba-20-foot
     
    Tenwheeler likes this.
  11. Bls repair

    Bls repair Senior Member

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    Did you have a single line pull or two part?
     
  12. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    We never had any luck with the winch. We bought the tractor for that winch, but found the cable broke too often, got pinched and mangled on the drum. Plus the cable corroded on the drum faster than we could break it. In a season the cable got shorter and shorter and shorter. In the end, a really heavy grade 100 chain is easier to deal with, handier, faster, gets the job done with less messing around.

    I know the forestry guys use the winches all the time. What i don't know is how they manage to make the cable work for them.
     
  13. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    I emailed the bubba company

    thx

    Ken
     
  14. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    single line
     
  15. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Working load on a 5/8" chain isn't that great.

    There's no way to eliminate the shock load in pulling on a tile plow, so I think you are just going to have to oversize your rigging.

    I could see the winch being a pain, much easier to just back up and hook on, than drag out all that line.

    I think I'd try a heavy roundsling, something like this:

    https://www.riggingwarehouse.com/default.aspx?page=item+detail&itemcode=318-EN600X16&catlist=5102

    $360 for a 16' Brown roundsling, rated at 53,000 for lifting (that's at a 3 to 1 safety factor-breaking is 3 times that). You can order different lengths. If it breaks, no steel flying. You may have to get a couple bigger shackles, it will be about 3" in diameter, I don't know what your hookup points are like. You can order whatever length you want, it just costs more.

    Unfortunately , you're going to get it kind of muddy out in the fields, just try to wash it off and let it dry. If you get it wet and then leave them out in the cold, they can freeze, if you use them frozen it can damage them. Just lay it out in the shop and let it thaw.

    You can go all the way up to a black roundsling, but they are kind of bulky. The slings are color coded for capacity. I use blue colored ones, but I'm 4 leg picking with them most of the time, so I've got 80,000 of lifting with 4. I think a brown would be sized pretty good for what you're trying to do.

    A steel cable choker would be more durable than the roundsling, but a brown roundsling 16' long weighs 44lbs. The same capacity in a steel choker would take 1 5/8" and probably weigh over 150lbs.
     
  16. funwithfuel

    funwithfuel Senior Member

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    A little waste oil dripped on the drum from time to time, keep that rope from rusting. Plus having appropriately rated cable helps.
    All that said , be careful with chain and cable. Nothing is worth losing your head over.
     
    watglen likes this.
  17. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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    We did the oil thing. Just didn't seem to help much. Was using 1 -1/8" cable from a high end rigging supply house here in Canukistan. And winding the cable on the winch invariably pinched it. If it wound on nicely, then pulling with the tracks would put enough strain on it that it would pinch anyway. Just never got the hang of it. Plus 5 crosby u-clamps on the free end would routinely slip out. We struggled with those lots with proper installations and torques etc. Just never got anywhere for all the effort. Chain works. Until it snaps.
     
  18. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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  19. Queenslander

    Queenslander Senior Member

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    I’ld just use heavier chain.
    We use 1 1/4" high tensile chain as leads on a scrub pulling chain, and it easily handles two D7s tugging on it all day.
    Still light enough that a sizeable length can be manhandled if necessary.
    Use good quality shackles rather than hooks.
     
  20. watglen

    watglen Senior Member

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