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17" lowboy tires?

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by JBGASH, Aug 23, 2019.

  1. JBGASH

    JBGASH Senior Member

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    Looking at a new 35ton Pitts fixed neck lowboy trailer, it has the Budd 17" low profile tires & rims instead of 22.5's. Anyone had bad experiences with these 17" rims & tire? I have 15" Dayton rims on my old lowboy now that are not the very good and do not want anything like them again.
     
  2. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    Ahh the Dayton wheels, those are fun!! good for hauling
     
  3. Oldcatpusher

    Oldcatpusher Well-Known Member

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    17.5’s aren’t bad. I had a them on a 20 ton tag trailer. Never had any trouble. A friend has a landoll trailer with them and moves 25 ton machines all the time with no trouble.
     
  4. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    I upgraded my trailer to 12k axles and went with the super single 17.5 tires, boy are they heavy though but 6k pounds per wheel
     
  5. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    17.5 do pretty good the lopros dont like curbs with a load but other than that they are pretty good I have had 2 35 ton lowboys on 17.5s

    I have learned to buy mid range or higher end tires in that size when its 115 in the summer 17.5 can get warm fast and the cheap ones break down from heat
     
  6. JBGASH

    JBGASH Senior Member

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    What brands do you find to be good?
     
  7. Oldcatpusher

    Oldcatpusher Well-Known Member

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    Hankook and Goodyear are what I have the best with.
     
  8. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    Sumitomo does good as well as falken there about the same as hankook in my book I can buy them from a wholesale outfit for really good prices

    Goodyear's are usually 30 to 50 more per tire around me

    Continental is probably one of the best but they are spendy I do buy those for steering tires they usually dry wrought before they wear out
     
  9. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    I've had no problems with mine, since I pull so rarely I went with the cheap ones, been about 1.5 years and still look brand new even after leaving a lot of black marks from tight turns loaded getting into and out of places. Shocking how much they will flex. The lower deck height is really nice for loading though. Although maybe it's just me but they seem to sink really bad in soft ground. Buried the trailer a few times when the truck goes through without leaving a mark.
     
  10. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    I've had several trailers that ran the 17.5's, have two right now that have them on as well.

    I'm not sure if your aware of this or not, guessing you are, but 17.5's are run on smaller axles, the brakes are much smaller than those on 22.5's.

    The only reason to ever buy a trailer with them on is to save critical deck height when something is loaded.

    I have no idea what your hauling, how far your going at any one time, how heavy your loaded at all times and what time of year your running, but I'd opt for 22.5's any day of the week and twice on Sunday.

    The issues with 17.5's we've had are these, everyone stocks 22.5's, hardly anyone stocks 17.5's and nobody will stock the brand you like to run and buy, those will be special ordered every time.

    The smaller brakes and drums heat up much faster, causing brake fade much quicker, this in turns heats the rims faster and on hot summer days, translates into blown tires much faster especially if your loaded close to max weight on pavement.

    I'll second that continentals are the best 17.5 bar none, nothing else comes even close for tire life or wear capabilities or will withstand the heat of summer.

    Brake issues and wear are much higher with 17.5's by far, same goes for costs to repair or replace anything brake related, drums are replaced much more often with the smaller drums verse the larger ones, over centering of the cams happens much sooner with the smaller brakes, as they say in the same given distance driven, those 17.5's are higher cost per mile in everything compared to 22.5's and the larger brakes and drums.

    I don't know if they make the smaller brakes and drums in outboards or not, I've only ever had inboard brakes and drums in 17.5's, its certainly something to ask about, any brake work is so much easier with outboard brakes, and also cheaper.

    With the smaller brakes and drums comes more brake adjustments due to the shorter throw of the brakes to begin with, your window of adjustment is also smaller, so once adjusted cold you have to recheck them warm, most times they will heat enough to be set too tight once heated up and driven.

    I have no idea if its in the brand of pads used, but I've never had a brake pad spit off the shoe on a 22.5, those you wear down to the rivets almost, but every 17.5 I've ever had, would spit the pads off the shoes long before they were worn out, nobody stocks anything I've ever had for the smaller brakes on 17.5's, those are always ordered and you wait or you run them with some pads spit off the shoes till the new shoes come in. One trailer I had was so rare we'd have to take my worn out shoes in and have new pads put on them, then wait to get them back again.

    Not sure what else your wanting to know about them, I could type pages of things we've had issues with involving 17.5's and unless the trailer is so much cheaper or loaded height is that critical I'd avoid them myself, 22.5's will be much cheaper in the long run. Best of luck on whatever you decide.
     
    JBGASH and JPV like this.
  11. JBGASH

    JBGASH Senior Member

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    Thanks Randy. I passed on that trailer with the 17.5 tires, just for most of the reasons you listed. I ended up getting a Load King Tri axle folding neck with 22.5 rubber and in the process of building a set of hydraulic ramps for the back end. I haul a mix of heavy items and lighter equipment and want to be able to load from front or back quickly as needed.
     
  12. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Hydraulic ramps are definitely the way to go. If the trailer is in good shape and have the ability to load from either end, you've got the best of all worlds.