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Question about semi U blades

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by pp13bnos, Sep 18, 2012.

  1. pp13bnos

    pp13bnos Senior Member

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    I've been using a D3C LGP to push up silage on my farm. The blade was narrowed down by the previous owner to 8ft. After making a video, it got me to thinking...maybe a semi u blade would work better for doing my line of work. I would have no problem investing the time and money into it, if it could save me 15-20 minutes on a normally 2 hour job. On the other hand, if things go the way as planned, I would like to get a D5 LGP machine in probably 2ish years. So would this little project in the off season be worth while, or should I forget the idea?

    Here is a link to a video of me pushing up silage.

    http://youtu.be/E5MmmgNo-CQ

    Thoughts and opinions would be appreciated. CJ
     
  2. lumberjack

    lumberjack Senior Member

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    What if you made the blade taller to increase capacity? Perhaps even make it removable so you can still have full visibility for other tasks.
     
  3. Multiracer

    Multiracer Senior Member

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    Looking at that material you could probably find an old root rake and skin it with some light metal.
    Simply adding a couple of foreword edges to the existing blade will help carry the load up the pile.
     
  4. Bumpsteer

    Bumpsteer Well-Known Member

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    Most of the dairy guys here use an Articulated 4x4 tractor with a 14' blade.....

    Ed
     
  5. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . pp13bnos. I reckon just a couple of clip on wings would be the go in that material or you could make a drive in like these

    http://www.homan.com.au/Stickrakes/Stickrakes.html

    It sure looks like the little tractor could handle (say) three foot extra on either side and it would sure save some time.

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012
  6. buckfever

    buckfever Senior Member

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    what about one of those box blades they use for pushing snow? Maybe look to find one used and make a pin on mount that would make it easy to remove. Plues you could plow snow in the winter if you wanted.
     
  7. Plant Fitter

    Plant Fitter Senior Member

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    I wouldn't put any permanent SU type extensions on, as then if you want to angle the blade, the dirt wont run off the end.

    I would either make a removeable drive in, or some straight extensions that will still work when the blade is angled.
     
  8. pp13bnos

    pp13bnos Senior Member

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    Thanks everyone for the responses. Yeah, I definitely don't wont anything permanent, and Plant fitter brings up a good point about rolling off the end. I like being able to tilt the bland and role stuff to the edge of the pile, and not get to close. I had a bad experience last summer with me taking a nose dive on the dozer, and busting out 4 teeth, and a inch hole under my lip. Lesson learned when it comes to being to close to the edge. :/
     
  9. dirtdobber1

    dirtdobber1 Well-Known Member

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    pp13,

    I have an observation, but since I know nothing about the keeping of silage you can call me a dummy if you like. I notice that much of your time is actually travel time. The blade loads at the bottom of the hill and the you have to push it to the top. Is it possible for that material to be piled in a different way so that your travel is less? Steeper perhaps?

    Ultimately, a wider blade (extension or otherwise) will serve you well.
     
  10. robin yates uk

    robin yates uk Senior Member

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    that attachment looks perfect Scrub Puller
     
  11. pp13bnos

    pp13bnos Senior Member

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    Dirtdobber1, in years past I would stack it as close as I could to a 1-1 slope. But I noticed I would get alot of rot on the edges, where I couldn't pack it. So this year decided to do longer pushes, and not have such a steap pile. I'll see how this works. :beatsme
     
  12. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . robin yates uk.

    Yes mate, they work very well. This is the style of rake I was referring to on another thread when I said we had no success with replaceable wear points . . . we used to just weld old pins from the track press or strips of cutting edge to the bottoms of the teeth.

    Cheers.
     
  13. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    The walk in rake posted by Scrub is a good looking unit. It doesn't seem to me you need the rake portion, but the wider, taller part would do you good.

    I think you could use something along the lines of the snow pushers as mentioned above. That would trap a lot more material in front of the blade without spilling it, and you can pick the width you want. You have 8' now, so I would say you could do 12' easily. 14 might work, but may be pushing it with the side loading forces.

    Here are a couple of links that may be helpful to get you some ideas. I would build whatever you do to be able to pin on and be easily removed for normal dozer work.

    http://www.ledexindustries.com/products_compact_tractor.php#

    http://protechcorp.com/Products/SuperDutySnoPushers.aspx

    http://store.melecioattachments.com/snow-pusher-14ft-