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Electrically Conductive Grease

Discussion in 'Lubrication' started by Countryboy, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    Who makes Electrically Conductive grease and what major automotive stores sell it. I've looked all over with no luck. I've asked at stores and most people don't know what I'm talking about. I've searched the internet and came up with a couple manufacturers but they don't list any stores where it's sold.

    This grease is different from Dielectric grease in that Dielectric grease is non- conductive. It's a neutral grease whose main purpose is to keep the elements (water, dirt) out of the connections. The grease I'm looking for actually conducts electricity.

    Any leads would be appreciated.
     
  2. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    I am curious about what it would be used for.Could you mix up something with powdered graphite in it maybe,seems like that would be conductive.If you only need a small amount it seems as though you could concoct a brew that would work.How about some fine copper dust mixed in with whatever else you could think of?This is interesting.What are you doing with it?.:) Ron G
     
  3. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    I'd bet he wants to lubricate something that travels along it's power source.

    The first thing I thought of was the good old-fasioned "street cars". They had an arm that reached up and followed the overhead wires. (Yeah, I know. I'm showing my age...)
     
  4. thehose

    thehose Active Member

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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2007
  5. MKTEF

    MKTEF Senior Member

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    All electricians that work with high current and amps do have this type of grease.:)
    They add it to the cables before crimping together to get good connection between the cable and crimped on shoes.
    Is also added to ends of cables when mounted into your fuseholder at home.

    Makes a bether connection without the need to tighten the hell out of the mounting bolts.
    Solves problems with overheat in the connection to the fuseholder.;)
     
  6. thehose

    thehose Active Member

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    That's pretty much why we used it. Not high voltage though. I was an airplane electrician. We used it on plugs because in the high altitudes freezing makes the pins shrink a little and lose connection.
     
  7. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    I had thought about something like that but thought it might be easier to just find it at a store....read as "Lazy" :D. Seems I might've been looking in the wrong places though. :beatsme

    Close....lubricating the reversers on the locomotives. They're getting some age on them and we are trying to get a little more life out of them. They run around $4,000 rebuilt and each locomotive has one. The tolerances are getting pretty far out so I figured I would give this a try.

    That's exactly the stuff I was speaking of. I actually looked at Nye Lubricants last night but I'm failing to find any information on these sites on where to get it locally. There's got to be a generic type company that sells this stuff at major stores.

    Do you think a place like Radio Shack would have this stuff, probably in small quantities to start with? A friend of mine who is an electrician is going to check with his parts house sometime this week to see if they have any.

    Thanks for the advice guys....I'm getting closer to the grease I seek. :drinkup
     
  8. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    Found some :cool:. Its called Noalox and its made by a company called "Ideal". It's available at most hardware and supply houses.

    My buddy actually had some in his truck. Its main use is as an anti-oxidant, used on aluminum/aluminum and aluminum/copper connections but it is also supposed to be conductive.

    Thanks for the help! :drinkup
     
  9. Catpower

    Catpower Well-Known Member

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    Electrical conductive greases.

    The electrical wholsalers will have what you want. We used Chance on 138 Kv buss conections years ago. Isn't Penatrox to be used on 750V and down? Got some here somewhere might have to go read it if I was to find it?
     
  10. Durette

    Durette Member

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    www.mcmaster.com ?

    I don't know what you're doing, but have you considered soldering the connection? I'll be better than any grease (as long as it doesn't crack).
     
  11. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    Welcome to Heavy Equipment Forums Durette! :drinkup

    The reverser has 4 rows of electrical contacts on a spindle that turns. 2 of the rows are for forward and 2 for reverse. The fact that it turns, to change the direction of current, rules out any type of soldering. The reverser tower was worn out. I was looking for a way to prolong it for a little while. It worked for a couple of more weeks then was replaced. This was on a locomotive by the way.

    Thanks for the input anyways. :)
     
  12. Durette

    Durette Member

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    Oxalic acid, sold as "barkeeper's friend" or "bon ami", will clean the hell out of contacts and remove oxidation.
     
  13. Johnsoils

    Johnsoils Site Sponsor

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    At work some of the electrical contractors have used a product by Sanchem on bus-bars and other electrical connetions. I've not dealt with them or their product but just yahoo'd them and they have a web site: www.sanchem.com

    You would have to call them and see if you can by direct, or maybe they can give you a vendor in your area. Sounds like some good stuff.

    Please let me know what you find out, as it might be helpful for someone else in the future.

    Good luck,

    John :usa

    johnsoils.com
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2008
  14. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

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    Are you looking for dielectric greese, the stuff you put on trailer conections?
     
  15. IH270A

    IH270A Active Member

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    I would think welder repair places would have a little , also you could try woodmizer , the
    bandsaw maker , if I aint mistaken they use it on one of their sawmills so it will have an
    electrical connection all the way down the beam ..
     
  16. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I found some a while back. :)
     
  17. bolens2002

    bolens2002 New Member

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  18. Haggar

    Haggar New Member

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    A use that everyone seems to miss is to lube the pivot bearing on a small wind turbine. That allows the mast to serve as the "ground" path. I came upon this thread while looking for a source for graphite grease (No one in this town seems to know what I am talking about!)
     
  19. porcupine73

    porcupine73 Member

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    I picked up a couple things from mcmaster. One was was called Koppershield I think it was by Thomas and Betts, which was sort of like a copper based antisieze but with more copper. The other was a conductive electrical grease. Electrical supply houses might have something to as I think that kind of grease might be used on switchgear, motor control center bucket stabs, etc.
     
  20. NL1CAT

    NL1CAT Well-Known Member

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    If need such thing I always use ordinary copper-grease.
    But be careful when you use this, it's easy to short something out.