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Can you widen a backhoe?

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by banditman, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. banditman

    banditman Member

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    Is it possible to widen the wheels on a backhoe like a case 580? I am needing to go do some work up in the mountains on water troughs but it is going to require being on some side hills. So that makes me pretty nervous with a stock backhoe.
     
  2. Planedriver

    Planedriver Well-Known Member

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    About the only chance you would have that I could think of would be to put clamp on duals on the back. You would have to find the proper spacers and I suppose you could rig some kind of fastening system to the wheel weight holes. (Welded anchor points on the rim would be preferred but still not good.)

    Have you considered adding ballast to the tires?
     
  3. Billrog

    Billrog Senior Member

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    Yes you can they have spacers for that purpose. I bought a 580 CK with them on once and it made a significant difference on side hills. Case sells them fairly expensive I thought.
     
  4. franklin2

    franklin2 Well-Known Member

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  5. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    Oddly enough, when traveling side hills I'd just swing the boom to the uphill side and even though it feels like its going to go over at any moment, it never has. A little weight in the uphill bucket side doesn't hurt either, I did some experimenting and found that when it'd start to get honestly tippy, the uphill tire would loose traction a fair bit before approaching that balance point. I always thought if I was making a habit of it. loading the tires would be a good way to go.
     
  6. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Mine is 4 x 4 580K. It looks very top heavy, but is surprisingly stable. I put the downhill stabilizer 6" from the ground, and swing the hoe uphill. A big rock in the rear bucket gives a significant bit of stability. The front bucket full of dirt, carried just above the ground stabilizes nicely. Beet juice in tires is a great ballast that isn't so very corrosive, and won't poison your dog if it leaks. Then, if you still want, duals on the rear, that will let you work the side hills on Everest. If you can't buy spacers, any good fabricator can make them. Tire chains are a big help year round.

    Willie
     
  7. Billrog

    Billrog Senior Member

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    When you consider flats or just changing tires with loaded tires spacers become more desirable. If you have to cross a slope side ways put your lower stabilizer down a ways ( not to low as to hang up) and you can also fill the front loader bucket and keep it low to help you get where your going. I live on a mountain and get plenty of experience with slopes sticking my boom up hill isn't an option do to trees . In time you get to know your machine and react accordingly when a back wheel lifts of the ground but it is some thing best avoided. Spacers definitely add a degree of safety.
     
  8. alrman

    alrman Senior Member

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    Just keep in mind, if you do "widen" the rear wheels, it will have a negative effect while digging with the front bucket as machines are built with the bucket being slightly wider than the axle/tyre tracking width.
    I guess, it depends on what you use the machine for, if that would bother you.
     
  9. banditman

    banditman Member

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    Wow thanks for all the great info guys!!!
     
  10. fast_st

    fast_st Senior Member

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    for a co-worker we found out that the common six lug bobcat wheel spacers will fix, needed to put tire chains on a super E, they sell backhoe spacers for a big wad of cash but the bobcat spacers are easy on the wallet.
     
  11. oceanobob

    oceanobob Senior Member

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    I can also report (without saying how) the backhoe will steer "strangely" once that back wheel comes off the ground.... Be Aware of this change in response, it is quite unsettling.
     
  12. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Been there, done that. The earlier John Deere compact utility tractors with loader had more lifting power than they should. Carrying a boulder, turning off a raised road, onto the shoulder the rear wheels would lift off the ground. Pivoting on the front axle is most unsettling!

    Willie