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Wrecking Ball vs High Reach **video**

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by EarthRockHill, Jan 27, 2010.

  1. EarthRockHill

    EarthRockHill Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    In August of 2009 I photographed the demolition of a pair of cold storage warehouses in Lowell, MA for Testa Corp. They were originally going to be demolished with a wrecking ball swung from their 1971 HC238 Link Belt Truck Crane. When concern arose regarding the proximity of one of the buildings to neighbors on the right and powerlines to the rear they decided to bring their 2008 Komatsu 1250 PC with a Jewell High Reach and LaBounty Shear in as well.

    Although separate buildings, constructed two different ways, they shared the same footprint on the site.

    As machines and attachments arrived it became apparent that there would be a showdown of old school versus modern technology, The Wrecking Ball vs The High Reach.

    YouTube - Wrecking Ball vs. High Reach
     
  2. ddigger

    ddigger Senior Member

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    Very cool thanks for sharing. There have been many times I have either swung or dropped wrecking balls with my excavator, very effective!
     
  3. EarthRockHill

    EarthRockHill Well-Known Member

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    I have 2 votes for the Link Belt and 1 vote for the High Reach..... what do you guys think?
     
  4. mikef87

    mikef87 Senior Member

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    I'd say the ball looks more effective but for finesse work the high reach would probably be your best bet.
     
  5. Cat is ALL

    Cat is ALL Well-Known Member

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    High reach was quite a bit a cleaner, I imagine quite a bit cheaper as well. (I thought crane operators got the good wages)
     
  6. Demo_Andy

    Demo_Andy Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Location:
    England
    My vote is for the high reach, slightly biased but.... the arguments for a high reach far outweigh that of the wrecking ball.

    Good video btw Stephen, I like all your work.
     
  7. Turbo21835

    Turbo21835 Senior Member

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    Around here, demolition scale for an excavator operator is the same as a crane operator running less than 400 feet of boom.
     
  8. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    Cool vid
     
  9. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    I like the way the comparison was made. Goes to show both ways are able to get the job done. To ask which is better is a matter of perspective.

    Operators perspective: Komatsu is much more comfortable and less effort to run. Has to operate with a great deal of care to not damage the machine. Link belt is a workout to do this work with, but is pretty forgiving with minor mistakes.

    Company owners perspective: Link Belt, paid for many times over, could be replaced inexpensively, but why, it was built to last. Komatsu, probably a $2 million investment, and it would be a surprise to see it in use productively 39 years from now.
     
  10. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    Never though of it like that excellent point. Dang now I really need to learn to run a crane. Should of done it when I had the chance.
     
  11. OneWelder

    OneWelder Senior Member

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    On the late news last week or week before they showed a brick building in Lowell they said was being demoed. - a worker was hurt by bricks blowing off one of the walls. Rescue people formed a human shield until they got him to safety
    I am not a demo guy , but it struck me as odd the way they were doing it
    Three brick walls probably 5 stories high, no roof, no floors, one end wall completely gone- also did not appear to have bracing of any kind
    Just surprised they left the walls standing at that height with poor mortar - on building that was coming down
     
  12. EarthRockHill

    EarthRockHill Well-Known Member

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    That's because it was a construction site, not a demolition site in Lowell.

    Totally unrelated to this job.

    Its an old mill building that was gutted by fire decades ago that is being rebuilt as affordable housing units.

    See attached story. Lowell Sun.com
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2010
  13. Demo_Andy

    Demo_Andy Well-Known Member

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    The komatsu might well be a $2 million dollar investment, but its well worth it to the company. Think of the multiple jobs this machine can do compared to the crane-

    grab, dig, hammer, etc, etc.

    The crane is pretty much a one trick pony, the komatsu is expensive but earns much more than that crane.

    And high-reach resale is good.
     
  14. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Andy

    Don't get me wrong, I was not knocking the Komatsu, and it is a very versatile machine, but I was merely pointing out the long life of the simple method of the drop ball on a crane, versus the high cost of the new iron.

    I do stand on the doubt that the Komatsu will still be in service in 39 years, unless it were to spend a great many of those years mothballed.
    Is it still worth the high cost? It is as long as there is a need for the type of work it does.
     
  15. heavytorching

    heavytorching Member

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    pretty cool,great video,if ya had a crusher on site you could make yer own 21aa and make even more$$
     
  16. EarthRockHill

    EarthRockHill Well-Known Member

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    Testa's Terex Crusher came in later in the process. Nothing is wasted. Everything is recycled and/or redistributed.

    First the building was brought to the ground. While that happened rebar was systematically removed from columns and supports with a LaBounty muncher on a 345. Then concrete was crushed while the sub-basements were dug and hammered out.
     
  17. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    Pretty cool vid. I'll be the first to admit I know nothing of demo except the kind that comes out of the barrel of a tank cannon and what I learned in a demo (the kind that goes BOOM) course. I can see where both the crane and high reach have thier places. I just got an old JCB TLB yesterday. My first piece of construction equipment. So I'd say I'm about to learn things.

    Rick
     
  18. demolitiondave1

    demolitiondave1 New Member

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    A high reach is generally 50 - 100 ton machine. Not a great lot of general use on sites here in England for the larger machnes. 20 tonners are the norm, so I think a high reach would not be that versatile
     
  19. Zssi

    Zssi New Member

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    Where can be found new wrecking balls today? Do you know any place?
     
  20. Zssi

    Zssi New Member

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