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Worker shortage

Discussion in 'Personnel' started by Sberry, Jun 26, 2021.

  1. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    The degree proves you can conform to stupidity and blend in with a hierarchy environment where your to be told what to do so you can be credited with success it is rather limited in its ability to make a person innovative or a critical thinker because those traits and skills dont comply with a curriculum of being told what is fact and what is not that you can only know what you have learned from a teacher or professor because they are masters of the subject of study

    Degrees breed entrenchment and nepotism of sorts like trust the formula and stick to it to solve the problem and my favorite is they have the same degree of study as I do so I am safe to hire them cause we will mesh well being taught the same way

    In reality diversity of experience and especially multi industry experience of applicable trades brought together at one group is far superior because it is not single minded or theory driven but it result of PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE driven

    So degree holders in large part will never want non degree holders in there immediate tier of work for a company as that separates them from the pack and makes them stand out with typically a 3rd to double the work experience for people under 40

    Sorry I worked for a corporate outfit I was the only one in management that didn't have a degree my ideas were different than the rest and were also treated differently than the rest
     
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  2. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    No degree here either where eventually the degree types would ask my opinion(after hearing me state such as ‘not gonna work’ and giving me crap as “the peanut gallery” until it proved was not gonna work.

    Would hear from them after failures asking how I knew when they had all this math and theory figured out. Just looked them noting ‘been tried before where I remember those tries’ or similar. Mainly used common sense as that was forever lacking in the boot licker Enga’s trying to impress a demanding superior that decreed “make it work”.

    Classic fail was sludge lagoons where river mud that had been flocculated out with chemical binders was sent. Five ponds were abandoned early as the mud would settle out at point of delivery to a pond corner, explained to me it had to carry further out by design but always stopped too soon. Looked at supervisor explained the use of flocculant was still working as the mud water mix discharged to the pond where was always gonna settle too early, he wrote that down, had escaped the Enga’s considerations.
     
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  3. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Stereotype much AZ?
     
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  4. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I believe it is the type of degree and the organization granting it that matters in most situations. The liberal arts types and business degrees have to be seasoned on lots of on the job training. I've worked with plenty of them who couldn't dig a ditch. I would say that those with engineering degrees can be very useful even just out of college. The difference is that the engineering degree requires some mastery of a tangible end product. The liberal arts, business and things like history have few if any tangible products. The engineer designs a machine on paper which would be pretty hard to do without those pieces of knowledge. The liberal arts major does what, interprets what a novelist writes, maybe works with people to ensure their feelings aren't hurt or produces something pleasing to the eye or ear. A medical doctor has to know all the organs in a body and how to treat their problems. What good is a history degree? Just how is an English teacher going to influence my life in a way that I would pay for? How is a business degree going to assist me in keeping a fleet of equipment running? We have all kinds of colleges offering relatively meaningless degrees which are supposed to be a proclamation of competence. The problem I have witnessed manifests when that piece of paper doesn't list what those competencies are. I'm supposed to believe in the reputation of the college that the person is qualified to accomplish something. From my experience, a degree only says that this person stuck around long enough and paid enough money to show they can complete something. Judging from the current labor market, that might be far more qualifications than many just off the street.
     
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  5. Carolina start up

    Carolina start up Well-Known Member

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    you guys talked to your guidance counselor?
     
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  6. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Mine locked his door when saw me coming!!!
     
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  7. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    The only guidance counselor when several of us went to school was this fellow below. It did all the talking, and you did the yelling.

    49c52c4960cad9275699bba468b0c369.jpg
     
  8. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Didn't you guys have a required class that the guidance counselor taught, if I recall it was mandatory to graduate high school, it had to be mandatory otherwise nobody would have even taken the class.

    Best example I know of, and this is absolutely true, the smartest kid in the whole high school, who went to an ivy league college, then later on taught at the same college for a career, could absolutely not master the ability to tie his shoes.........ever. He spent his whole 12 years in grade and high school stumbling over his shoe laces. 35 years after he graduated high school, I ran into his little sister in a store in town one day and the topic of her brother came up. The only thing I asked her about him was, did he ever learn to tie his shoes and she replied, absolutely not, he finally figured out if he wore slip on slippers, he'd never have to learn, so she handed me a photo of him, in front of hundreds of college kids teaching a class and she said, notice he's wearing bathroom slippers as he taught ivy league kids. The smartest kid to ever graduate from the local high school ever, and was not smart enough to tie his shoes......ever, nor ever apply his knowledge to anything in life except to teach others theory only, nothing practical or useful.
     
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  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Guy I started at the nuke with was ex US Navy Nuke, was incessantly tying his shoes, watched me put on my work boots, tied and never came loose rest of day unless took them off/untied them. He tried to mimic my tie method, never managed, became a supervisor, still could not tie shoes as I retired, TWENTY YEARS of watching the moron tie his shoes WRONG and watched him stumble on them over and over and over.

    Educated well or 'Smart' does not make one Intelligent or skilled. Most of us earned our Skills levels.
     
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  10. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    LOL. I never did!:D
     
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  11. Spud_Monkey

    Spud_Monkey Senior Member

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    Quality not quantity is the problem on worker shortage, They think the quantity of how much they get paid is better than the quality of workers they work for/with. Mickey D's may hire $15 plus an hour but the quality of workers there is sure missing.
    I live as everyone knows in no mans land and nearest town is just that a town with a Mickey D's hiring $15 plus an hour, hospital in town is hiring for less for patient intake, told the wife take the hospital job and after 3 interviews one across the board of staff she works there and I don't smell her like french fries, Covid-19 is rampant and they take it serious, safe environment to work in for most part, steady hours and the quality of people is higher in who they are their life ambitions and other factors they aren't just drones punching a time card.
     
  12. Carolina start up

    Carolina start up Well-Known Member

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    i think I talked to mine twice in 4 years then when I went to college I talked to one once because I needed one credit to finish and asked if one of my welding credits could do it beyond that
     
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  13. Carolina start up

    Carolina start up Well-Known Member

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    my buddy would just glue his together and call it day
     
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  14. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Well it was a required thing where I went to school. Actually think this one was probably under worked as the average graduating class in our school was under 100 students so that does not seem to be that big a crowd for her to deal with once you filter out the ones who would not be going on to further education and those who already had their plans set.
     
  15. Sberry

    Sberry Senior Member

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    I went to the college before i left high school. It can be done easy now but was not so regular then. They called the principle when i was at the intake office and the intake woman was laughing. Evide tly the principle had said,,, dont know why he want to go there, sure as hell dont wanna be here.
    Insaid,,, says a lot for him dont it?
     
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