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Work platform width

Discussion in 'Forklifts/Telehandlers' started by Speedpup, Feb 7, 2010.

  1. jstachowiak

    jstachowiak Member

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    Feb 12, 2010
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    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    Quote: Tried to call OSHA today but they were all gone a 3:30 pm

    When I called JLG to buy one a few months ago they had now and it was a 4 week wait to get one


    Calling OSHA will only confuse you more. I wouldn't even bother. They typically do not know.

    JLG is all but shut down, making truck cabs for Oshkosh truck's military vehicles.

    Three basic rules, keep forklift level, never travel with the boom raised and make sure your basket occupants are wearing harness and lanyard attached to anchorage. Fork tilt failure has and does happen. Good luck.
     
  2. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Service Manager
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    Knoxville TN

    I tend to agree with ya speedpup. I mean, can we possibly make this any more complicated? Like you stated, let's say you need to do a patch job on a chimney hit by lightning. You have 3 choices to choose from and safety is involved in all three. Obviously, the best choice is a manlift. But, are the other two choices too unsafe to be viable options? Second choice would be a telehandler with a designed work platform. Third and last choice is an erected scaffold. Now, in my youth, I have erected and worked off of more scaffold than I even care to remember. Climbing is dangerous by itself. Erecting and tear down has it's dangers. Workers have to be focused working on scaffolds. For a simple repair or small job, I would prefer a platform on a telehandler over a scaffold any day. It would greatly reduce the amount of time to do the project as opposed to set up and tear down of scaffold. And with modern telehandlers having holding valves on cylinders, I don't have a fear of them falling down. After all, I don't recall seeing constant news reports on the nightly news about telehandlers falling over with men in a platform. I think the biggest factor in the platform on a tele debate is driven by liability. Myself, with a modern machine, and a competent qualified operator, I would feel at ease in a platform on a telehandler. :yup
     
  3. jstachowiak

    jstachowiak Member

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    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    5' forks, 6' forks doesn't matter still a 24" load center. Moving the load center out
    12" can mean a loss of up to 2000 lbs. of capacity.
     
  4. jstachowiak

    jstachowiak Member

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    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    BTW, forks are stamped with a capacity. The combination of the two forks has to be equal to or greater than the maximum capacity of the forklift.

    Example: JLG installs a 10,000 lb. fork carriage with two 5,000 lb. x 24" (load center) forks on all their 6,000 lb. to 10,000 lb. reach forklifts.
     
  5. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    President and all else that needs done!
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    I ran my first Lull a 7-C1 1966 in 1977 It was rated for 4,000 lb at 34' and believe me it didn't feel that great. I still have it and it hasn't worked in years I wonder wat it would feel like now?

    Even when a hose would pop on a 7-C1 with no holding valves it would come some what slowly.
     
  6. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    President and all else that needs done!
    Location:
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    The people I call will most likely be the people I see in the field from OSHA if I am unlucky. You are right the ones I have talked to in the last ten years a clueless and it is a disgrace.

    When I saw Gradalls going for 10-15% of their value after 5-6 years I can't imagine JLG doing anything. They have been laying off for two years.
     
  7. JohnPa1

    JohnPa1 New Member

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    Feb 10, 2019
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    Location:
    Nyssa, OR
    OSHA will allow a platfoum to be 20" wider that the width of your telehandler. A 8' wide telehandler can use a 9'6" Work platform. Here is a link where you can get a 4' x 10' work platform. https://www.horizonattachments.com/Telehandler-Work-Platforms-Aerial-Work-Platform-s/257.htm