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Winter fuel versus summer fuel?

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by RTSmith, Mar 5, 2020.

  1. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    OK- my farm tank is dry and I need fuel. But the order I get now will be winter fuel that I'll run into the summer. What is the difference in the two? Any issues I need to be aware of?
     
  2. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    Winter fuel will be a slightly lower BTU, so slightly more gallons to do the same work, and slightly less maximum HP out of the engine. Higher Cetane might make the engines feel more snappy.

    What did your fuel supplier say? is it even winter fuel to start with?
     
  3. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    OK- we know what happens when one assumes.....but that's exactly what I did. I assumed it was winter blend. I'll ask.
     
  4. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    And Delmar, you are right. Same fuel, they just add the anti-gel to the holding tank with it when it arrives according to my supplier.
     
  5. check

    check Senior Member

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    But the question remains what does the refiner do to the fuel before the distributor takes possession?
     
  6. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    The supplier should know what he's getting, if he's getting winterized fuel, he's PAYING extra for it. Straight #2 is distributed all year around here, it has a warning label at the truck stops so you know what you're getting.
     
  7. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Just order number 2 if you want summer fuel. Winter fuel is not always made using an additive. Our local pumps say 25#1/75#2. When real cold they go to 50/50. One station has pump signs that say treated to at least -10 F on the #2 pump. Before they installed the new computerized our Cenex offroad pump had a hand selector to choose #2, 75/25, 50/50 or 75% #1.
     
  8. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder

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    Many places will blend kerosine with the fuel oil for the winter as it helps with preventing gelling. As mentioned fuel economy and power will suffer since kerosine has a lower BTU rating. Other companies may add an anti gelling agent that raises the cost of the fuel. Personally I prefer to get straight fuel oil and treat it myself, I control the quality of the anti gelling capacity.
     
  9. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    Beware … K1 kerosene has more sulfur (400ppm max sulfur) than permitted for ULSD fuel. ULS kerosene must be blended to maintain the (15ppm max sulfur) Sulfur content for Tier 4 machines. Your DPF will thank you ...

    https://www.suncoastresources.com/fuels/kerosene/
    "...Sun Coast Resources, Inc. offers 1-K kerosene (400ppm max sulfur) and K-2 kerosene (3,000 ppm max sulfur) in selected markets. 1-K kerosene (conforming to ASTM D 3699 Specifications is primarily used for space heating.

    In selected regions of the country, ultra low sulfur kerosene (15ppm max sulfur) is available in limited quantities for blending with ULSD to improve cold flow properties during frigid temperatures."
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2020
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  10. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    Interesting thought HP. Hadn't thought about the sulfur aspect. Don't have a lot of hours on anything yellow with a DPF. I do see the built in service minder for the Cat compact equipment tags it for a "service" at 3,000 hours.
     
  11. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    Well, when the only local source for dyed fuel is the farmer's Co-op, you take their fuel. :) Or you don't get fuel. Their choices are simple- Diesel, or gasoline......
     
  12. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    I wonder what percentage of Kerosene is blended to prevent gelling at say -10 degrees F ?
     
  13. check

    check Senior Member

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    I don't personally start any diesels under about 15 degrees, but most of the loggers around here simply add Howes diesel treat to their fuel in the winter. It seems we are always dealing with unknown variables when we buy fuels and TPTB don't seem to want us to know the scoop.
     
  14. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Nobody adds kerosene here. Just mix with #1. Most of the loggers run straight #1 in the equipment in the woods. Kerosene runs close to $5.00 a gallon here.
     
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  15. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    If they went by your 15 degree rule here everybody would be shut down for 4 or more months a year. :(:(
     
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  16. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Does Tennessee get cold enough to worry about fuel gelling. I never knew it got that cold there. We run #2 without additives down to about zero with no worries at all. Back in the day the 2 stroke Detroit's had enough fuel return that they would run on #2 year around as long as they were warmed up before running them hard. They would melt a foot of snow off the fuel tank in half a day from warm fuel.
     
  17. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    #2 household furnace fuel is my choice.
     
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  18. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    OIH … Balmy Mid- North Carolina, where the frost line for water is 6 inches had a few days of gelling fuel over the years. The first time I had gelling, the equipment choked and sputtered. but, eventually started. I usually just wait a day or so for warmer weather. But do treat the fuel in the equipment so it'll start when I need it.
     
  19. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    I got lazy a few years ago. I live in VT, winters ain't what they used to be.
    The bulldozer got forgot with summer fuel. By the time I wanted it, it was cold.

    I changed filters, bled the injectors. It started, but barely moved.

    I got 15 gallons of #1 kero. Some Diesel 911, it started, but had no power. Two hours running, it suddenly ran on all four.

    I'm told #2 fuel congeals into wax globules, they do not dissolve when it gets warm. They will plug filters and injectors even warm. I've heard at temperatures near 0 F.
     
  20. RTSmith

    RTSmith Senior Member

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    I lived through a Deere ag tractor gelling up a few years ago. -18 degrees F and feeding livestock as it just slowly died- just like you were gently pulling out the fuel shutoff handle. It sat in the field for a week before it got back up closer to 40 and it would start again. So I've tried to be a little more proactive since then. But you are right. Probably aren't many places where we can run from -18 to 40 in a week. We call it "Welcome to Tennessee. Don't like the weather, wait a half hour and it will change."