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Wife speaks of her loss

Discussion in 'Safety Competition' started by stock, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    We have moved on and now were lost....
    Location:
    Eire
    Last year on this wee island 30 people were kill in farm accidents, as part of a safety campaign those who are left to pick up the pieces speak on the affect of the accident and how it impacted on their lives. I found this video tough to watch and I hope it has the desired effect. Please take 5 mins and see what you think.
    [video=youtube;34gWt_PMd4k]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34gWt_PMd4k[/video]
     
  2. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    Ret
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    vining mn
    Being around equipment is dangerous. Farm equipment is about as bad as it gets with PTO shafts, constant on and off of equipment to make adjustments, replace shear pins or to clear a plug from a baler/combine or picker. Show this vid to 10 farmers and 9 will say "well that guy was stupid" or "I've been doing that forever and I ain't never been hurt, you just gotta be careful". Fair number of equipment operators will say the same thing. Machinery can bite and most often bites hard!

    Rick
     
  3. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

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    Finish grader operator
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    NB Canada
    A lot of people get their feathers ruffled when they hear safety, or see the safety man. I was always one of them. I fought with safety people so much, that the company pretty much forced me to join the Joint Health and Safety Council. As with most government jobs, a lot of these guys let it go to their head. After a while you begin to see that it is all about the liability. You can do something a million times unsafe, and the millionth and first time you get hurt, or killed. Right off the bat, the fingers start pointing...I didn't know...no one told me..it's the supervisors fault....they should have had a guard on that or a railing...it's the companies fault......we were unaware of the rules, it's the government's fault. So the government makes rules, and hires people to make sure that the companies know them, and follow them. The companies hire people to make company policies regarding safety, and educate employees about safety. If they don't, the liability lies with them. Supervisors properly educated enforce safety rules, and makes sure people under them work safe. If not, now they can be liable. Employees, now educated follow rules, point out risks, now everyone is safe. If only it were that easy. Unless everyone becomes involved, and each level of employee and management support each other, the system breaks down. If you get shot down every time you report something that is unsafe, after a while you start to ignore unsafe situations. I`m as guilty as anyone else. I never wear my seat belt operating machinery. I wear my hard hat as little as possible. I had an argument with a new operator about digging off the side of my tracks when digging. He was right, but his way was time consuming and made a mess. I will just be careful. Ive done it a million times. My heart goes out to anyone who has lost someone in a farming or construction accident.
     
  4. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    heavy equipment operator
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    Meriden ct
    I have gotten nailed by OSHA...it's 'spensive.We were in a trench above our shoulders without protection.I saw the competition ride by in a company truck just prior to getting tattled on and you never know what they look like until you are hit.I was working for the town that my boss had just told me he was "tight" with.hah.Ron G
     
  5. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Ron, Im glad the bank held up fine and you are still with us. A good friend got buried and died in a trench that was only shoulder deep in 1972. His brother was the hoe operator. The brother never completely recovered as there was plenty of room to dig a proper trench but it was all about production. OSHA can often be a pain but they are around for a reason.
     
  6. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    I agree of course,this trench was in the street and the sawcut was not wide enough for the depth of the trench.See,I can weasle my way out of it.LOL.Of course,OSHA don't care and we had aluminum trench boxes in the yard that could be hauled in a pickup and assembled on site but you know how it goes,"just this one time" and there you have it.I am sorry about the brother dying and do not know how that I would deal with it myself.You always have those things on your mind and you are always concious of your responsibility as an operator with men in the trench and checking that you have no shirt sleeves that can interfere with the controls and I like to hold my hands in plain view of the laborers while they are near the bucket and try to place the bucket where it would do the most good if there was a cave in but you know all of that,it must be the coffee.Ron G