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Why don’t Americans GET high reach excavators…?

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by CEwriter, Aug 14, 2009.

  1. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    We have moved on and now were lost....
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    and what about the bsw and Whit
     
  2. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2009
  3. Hendrik

    Hendrik Senior Member

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    Nah I reckon she was just going by what the concreter had told her after much thought I worked out that 5 inches is 12.5cm or thereabouts.
    Funny thing was I dug it out in a couple of hours with the dingo and she got a quote from another dingo pilot and he reckoned half a day and would have to pull out 9 tonne, I guesstimated that 4 tonne come out. And I am a very average dingo operator. Either this fella was trying it on (you know, female looking to get some work done, lets rip her off) or he didn't have a clue.
    Far as the metric v imperial thing goes, I have all metric machines so only have to carry metric tools:) but still have a pile of imperial tools as well.
     
  4. LONGREACH

    LONGREACH New Member

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    I'd like to set a few things straight. <**************snipped***************> In any event, there are a lot of high reach machines in the US. Mazzochi has some big ones, Rhine has 7 of them, longest is 163 feet without the attachment.

    They are simple to set up, most come on the lowboy assembled. Others have boom trailers with quick-couples which makes erection simple and fast. A lot faster than a crane.

    Separation and salvaging of materials is simplified . Recycling rates are vastly increased.

    Personnel safety is increased as there are less people in the demolition zone, water is controlled from the cab on a lot of machines, no hose person in demo area.

    I will say that Europe does have guidelines on the use of HRD machines to insure personnel safety, the US doesn't but does need to get on board quickly.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 8, 2009
  5. australian pete

    australian pete Senior Member

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    if you guys would swap to metric that would solve the problem, i dont suppose that will happen so we will have to keep both lots of tools.
     
  6. blueman

    blueman Well-Known Member

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    There are more HRD machines in North America than one might think. A trade magazine once considered assembling a population list of HRD machines in the world and tracking it. I guess it never happened but that would take the guesswork out of this. In the mining world a company made a very successful business of compiling and maintaining lists and details of giant trucks, shovels, and so forth around the world.

    As for HRD guidance, the NDA has drafted a guidance document for high reach machines and I would hope it gets approval and "goes to print" in the very near future.
     
  7. Dirty Digger

    Dirty Digger Member

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    ...163 feet (50m) is nothing to get too excited about, it's not really pushing the boundaries of technology is it?
     
  8. demolitionnews

    demolitionnews Member

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    HRD safety guidelines

    Having met with Mike Taylor of the National Demolition Association a few weeks ago, I can confirm that the NDA is planning to adopt the high reach guidance notes created in the UK by the National Federation of Demolition Contractors (I was lucky enough to be one of the co-authors). I don't know what timescale the NDA is working to, so if anyone would like a copy of the original UK/NFDC version, please just drop me a line with your postal address and I'll fire you one over.
     
  9. thodob

    thodob Well-Known Member

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    is this guidance available on the internet?
     
  10. xcavator120

    xcavator120 Well-Known Member

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    Hopefully not off-topic here, but here in Kansas there's more areas where a high-reach excavator would not be of any use. In the rural areas, the largest obstacle is called a tree. In the far western part of the state, trees are also known as tumbleweeds..:laugh

    So would this High-Reach be a mandatory thing for anyone involved in demolition? I've seen in some metro areas where they use controlled implosion to bring down skyscrapers, and also in some rural areas here, to bring down bridges. This is done by the experts, not just some whizz-bang that likes to see things go boom.
     
  11. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    Credit to Earthmovers

    here is picture from the Earthmovers mag
    earthmovers0002.jpg
     
  12. demolitionnews

    demolitionnews Member

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    The guidance notes are not currently available online, although if you'd like to drop me a line wiht your email address, I'll gladly send send you one. You can get me at markanthony1965@gmail.com
     
  13. thodob

    thodob Well-Known Member

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    stock: what is the axle-load on that transport ? dont see to be more than 7 axles??? In that case you need pretty good roads...
     
  14. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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    I would think 30 tons would pull that section of boom up , that truck and trailer should be fine with that load .
     
  15. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    Liebherr 984-002-d oct08.jpg

    This is what she looks like assembled ,the counter weight is reputed to be 30 ton..
     
  16. special tool

    special tool Senior Member

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    Technology?
    Let's not get carried away.
    We are all just knuckleheads who move sticks....we don't need to use that word like we are going to Jupiter or trying to pass Mika Hakkinen....:D

    This whole thread stems from some writer's knowledge that he'll get press by insinuating that AMERICANS (God forbid) don't own the BIGGEST of something....its always news - and you all know it.
     
  17. 245dlc

    245dlc Senior Member

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    Well here in Canada there are a few HRD machines but we're much like in the U.S. we have more room (Canada is still the second largest country in the world) and those demo machines still have to serve they're original purpose which is moving earth. Plus machines like Testa's PC1250 are extremely expensive to buy and extremely costly to transport around. And here in Western Canada there aren't enough of these very large industrial demolitions to justify the purchase of such specialized equipment. Here machines like that are used in mines, quarries, highway construction, and gravel pits where it does pay to have something that big. And I think we do actually perform a lot of recycling here, concrete is recycled into gravel, steel gets cut up and goes to steel mills, brick gets salvaged for new homes or buildings and if it isn't salvageable it's used for fill or crushed like concrete. Currently I'm working on a project where the building is built out of large wooden beams and they'll be salvaged too. Even though this is an old thread I had to take a stab at it too and I didn't like how somebody who doesn't even operate equipment, manage or run a construction or demolition company tries to portray us (Canadians and Americans) as if we live in some third world country with no safety standards.
     
  18. demolitionnews

    demolitionnews Member

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    US Guidance is available now

    Just so you know, the NDA's version of the high reach guidance is available now. Please see here for details.

    As for the suggestion that I only wrote the original article to gain notoriety, all I can say is that this is a story that has been the source of ongoing discussion for almost a year now. Either I am very good at manipulating the zeitgeist or this is a subject of serious industry interest. Personally, I believe it's the latter.
     
  19. ORDINGEN

    ORDINGEN Member

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    Are those HRD's equipped with a boom mounted camera ?
    Apparently boom mounted cameras are getting popular by the day ?
    Does anyone has some good experiences with boom mounted cameras ?
    In which way are they best to be positionned ?
    Any pictures of boom mounted cameras available ?
     
  20. markshr151

    markshr151 Well-Known Member

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    I was reading this thread and the next day down came the local power plant.I no the company's involved and this is a classic U.S. demo job. 1.fast 2.lots of trucks 3.six to ten excavators with shears, grapples,hammers,and crushers. 4.lots of explosives.5 all concrete, metal and valuable components recycled. 6.No high reach excavators.7.Major hazardous obstacles.
    YouTube - Port St. John Power Plant