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which 4x4 5yard dump truck?

Discussion in 'Trucks' started by 707pc50, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. 707pc50

    707pc50 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    california
    I am looking for a ~5 yard dump truck that is a 4 wheel drive. The truck will be used for dirt hauling and road rocking, trash runs, and towing an equipment trailer and my pc50 excavator. It ideally will be a 26000 machine so it can be driven by non CDL guys when not towing. Anyone have any input on which trucks I should be looking for and where I should be looking. Looking for something under $16k that will be reliable.

    Also, I have a ford F800 mid eighties, with a nice dump box on it, with some major issues, that I will be selling, or was thinking I could have the dump box put on a different 4x4 rig if I could find a cab/chasis type of truck for a good buy. How much work is this, any guess on a cost estimate to have a shop do the swap?

    Thanks for any input
     
  2. Dualie

    Dualie Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Nor Cal
    A good 4x4 rig for under 16K is going to be hard. Most are horribly underpowered municipal trucks geared way to low.

    the other downside of 4x4 MDT's is they are HEAVY. its going to be hard to load them up very well and still be under 26K. If you dont absolutely NEED the 4x4 i would say you would be better off without it.

    Just out of curiosity does your current truck have a 2spd rear end? if so would you be willing to part the truck out since it has major issues.
     
  3. 707pc50

    707pc50 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    Thanks for the info, I really am not that worried about being over weight when loaded, most of my loaded up (at least with heavy material like rock) will be off highway, on highway mainly will be moving truck from job to job, and trash hauling, and the under 26000 is just so people with out cdl can drive the rig. I may end up going two wheel drive route, if a 4x4 is not in the cards. I might be interested in parting out the ford if i find a 4x4 cab/chasis and can swap the dump box set up over to the new truck and yes it has a 2 speed rear end.

    What are the desiered 4x4 5yard size trucks on the market?

    Thanks for the help
     
  4. Dualie

    Dualie Senior Member

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    Location:
    Nor Cal
    well its more about specs than brands. The ones your most likely to find are going to be International and Freightliner.

    Mostly internationals because they were the ones that would factory install 4x4 right on the assembly line.

    you might want to call mayer equipment in west sacramento. Their asking prices are fairly high but they are just that asking prices. 4x4 MDT's are hard to find in any variety as they aren't that handy for the added complexity.

    A 4x4 MDT is not even half as handy as a 4x4 pickup.
     
  5. 707pc50

    707pc50 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Location:
    california
    dualie- Thanks for all the info, I may end up just replacing my old ford with a newer more dependable 2wd rig, just thinking of all the times I get stuck in the winter spring and fall months in the ford, and how nice avoiding this would be. Finding something that is dependable and a non CDL driver can operate is the main concern, 4wd not as important. On that note... our ford is under 26000GVW and anyone can drive, it has hydraulic brakes, are air brakes an issue in california? I have seen people saying they have airbrake endorsment, can anyone get this? or is it only a CDL endorsment? Basically... if air brakes on truck do you need a CDL?

    Thanks for the info, I will swing by that equipment place next time im down that way. And I will let you know if I end up parting the ford out.
     
  6. Dualie

    Dualie Senior Member

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    Air brake endorsement is not needed.

    For the size your looking at a nice little 2 axle international with a DT466 would be perfect. Put a 6spd Allison auto or a spd stick behind it and you would have a nice little unit.
     
  7. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Movin dirt
    Location:
    Port Allegany, pa
    Well, here is what I think about 4x4 dumps. I used to own an army m818. Thats a 5 ton off road w/ a 10' box, and they are all wheel drive, tandems. Empty weight of the truck was 21k, yes thats in light triaxle category, underpowered, and had a turning radius of just under a half mile. I had the thing for three months and sold it, and thanksed the buyer kindly.

    Bought a 88' f-800 7.8 turbo, 10' box and guess what, it weights 14.5 empty and would run cirlces around that army thing power wise. Offroad, chain it up, and if it is still stuck, find something else to do.

    What would I do, I'd find a diesel single axle, 8-10' box, with a 7 or a 9 speed in it, locker in the rear and run that. If you have new drivers off road, might wanna consider an allison auto, I think an auto truck is treason personally....
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2011
  8. Sparkie

    Sparkie Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Cyrus MN
    :drinkup

    I think youd be better off with 2ws if your looking for a reasonably light truck. 4x4s are built real heavy duty. theres always the option of building your own
     
  9. heavylift

    heavylift Senior Member

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    I think air brakes requires CDLA... We had rentals, the water trucks had air brakes and required a CDLA driver... the dumps had hydraulic brakes.. No CDL....any one could drive... both trucks were single axle...
     
  10. Dualie

    Dualie Senior Member

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    All the flatbeds and dumptrucks i have ever rented have been airbrake. NO CDL required.

    That was before i bought my own. Anymore i wouldn't even consider a truck without airbrakes. If you ever had to pay for parts on a hyd brake system you would know why.
     
  11. CM1995

    CM1995 Administrator

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Running what I brung and taking what I win
    Location:
    Alabama
    That question seems to open pandoras box. In order to save this thread from going the way several others on the board have went when discussing this issue, I'll sum it up in a nutshell.

    Check your State rules. The Feds set minimum CDL standards the States must follow. The States can make their own CDL rules more stringent if they want, just not less. For example, in Alabama they go by the Feds minimum rules which classifies by weight - 26K and under with air brakes, no CDL required.

    Back to the original topic - Instead of 4x4, for the reasons mentioned, you may want to consider a winch. Lighter, cheaper and handier for a multitude of tasks.
     
  12. OmniEquipped

    OmniEquipped Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
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    Occupation:
    Business Owner
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I love 4x4's, but it depends on your application. The old Ford and International 4x4's are great trucks in my opinion, and obviously any Marmon-Herrington aftermarket conversion will be built right. If you do any amount of off-road service, you learn quickly that 2x4 is inadequate, especially when dealing with rough roads, washouts or loose and sandy conditions where chains will just dig you deeper. Furthermore, we pull trailers and 4x4 is a must on inclines. One non-CDL truck we currently use is a 1979 F-600 flatbed dump, as seen below. It's equipped with a Tulsa PTO winch and the owner fabricated a second transfer case to add to highway speed (this also added another low range if you can imagine how low that is); the truck can now cruise at 60 to 65 mph. This one is a genuine Ford-built 4WD, but you mostly see Marmon-Herrington systems which are the gold standard for aftermarket conversions. You can easily find these in the 1980's to early 90's models for less than 16K. There are pros and cons to anything, but if most of your work is off-road, then the lower gear ratios will be needed, and most of these rigs actually have a good turning radius.

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