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Whats the smallest truck you would pull this combination with?

Discussion in 'Trucks' started by hougie, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. hougie

    hougie Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    I'm looking at a new excavator, weight is going to be between 16-19000lbs (7250-8600kg). Trailer is a 30ft tri-axle dually goose neck, Weighs around 7500lbs (3400kg). My problem is i'm not sure what to buy as a truck to pull this, 23-27000lbs is alot of weight..... What's the minimum you would pull this with? A f450-f550 or bigger?
    Thanx

    Marc
     
  2. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    You'd be right at the maximum GCVW for an F-550, I'm not sure I'd want to move the machine a lot in hilly regions. A bigger truck would definitely be safer.
     
  3. millercross3

    millercross3 Well-Known Member

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    A little bigger actual truck will last you longer and utilize what it was intended for for a lot longer life span. I'd sure consider something with air brakes and manual tranny. Maybe a little more money up front initially, but long run....worth the while. Pull out the ball hitch attachment and put a small fifth wheel plate on your gooseneck and your golden. Make sure you cover your axle with a full fender. Side mirrors, back window and paint will thank you. My thoughts....may not be worth much...but still my thoughts:D
     
  4. denver m farms

    denver m farms Well-Known Member

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    The cheapest and best thing would be a single axle tractor. But if the trailer and machine was going to be around 24k and you own a good ton or 5500/550 truck, don't think for a minute that it isn't being done by a lot of people every day.
     
  5. lumberjack

    lumberjack Senior Member

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    In my AO (MS) I would pull it with my 550 no problem. Ideally I would have 4-6klbs of pin weight.

    I'm in Charlotte, NC currently with my F250 and a ~16-17klb 28' flatbed gooseneck. A 24klb trailer on a 550 wouldn't be a big deal so long as you have enough weight on the rear tires.
     
  6. hougie

    hougie Well-Known Member

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    Thank's for your input thus far guys. Steve i've been thinking about the traveling through the hills, The only concern i would have is having enough power. With 3 trailer and 2 truck axles braking i wouldn't be concerned about stopping power. i agree miller, A little bit bigger truck like a denver says maybe a single axle tractor would handle it better and probably last longer. But with a single axle tractor i'm limited to the use of the truck. If i was to get a 450/550 with a deck it could be utilized for much more then just hauling the equipment site to site. I know that it's being done denver, i know of a couple local guys who pull backhoes with 1-tons, Not even 450/550 and they get away with it i just don't know if it's the way to go.
     
  7. Tyler1022

    Tyler1022 Well-Known Member

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    millercross3 is right a 550 has the power to pull 27000lb just want last to long doing it. might want to get a single axel medium duty truck like a f750 or m2 freightliner business class just to be on the safe side
     
  8. lumberjack

    lumberjack Senior Member

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    My F550 has 212k miles on it, the F250 has 105k miles on it, no signs of stopping.

    It's not like he's long hauling the excavator putting 40-50k miles a year on with it. I'd bet 10k miles a year pulling the ex would be a rarity. Depending on his setup, the higher utilization of the F550 could more than pay for the reduced service life as opposed to having a dedicated truck that spends most of it's time sitting.
     
  9. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder Staff Member

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    I wouldn't be concerned about power if you aren't concerned about the speed you pull a hill, gears will take care of that. For most local moves the 550 will get the job done but there are times, at least where I live where you'd have to use extreme caution. You can have all the brakes you want but once they get hot they won't be worth a whole lot. I've grossed 30,000 hauling paving bricks with my 550 and trailer and I've gone down long grades at 15mph, the speed the engine would hold the truck at to avoid heating the brakes. We have hills here a mile or more long that you'd have to use extra care on. I was in your shoes, the 550 was what I had but I'd have much rather had a truck with an engine brake on it.
     
  10. heavylift

    heavylift Senior Member

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    I worked at a place that had a 550, it pulled whatever really well. The only thing I disliked, was the no miles to a gallon and the top speed of almost 60mph. Filling up twice a day was a real pain. I think it averaged 4 to 5 miles per gallon.
     
  11. lumberjack

    lumberjack Senior Member

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    I average around 8, still gives you 250 miles per tank usually.
     
  12. heavylift

    heavylift Senior Member

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    This one had a crazy low gear ratio, can't recall exactly, but I think it was in the mid 5's
     
  13. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

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    I have a '11 f-350 and an '88 f-800 both diesels, the 350 has a 6.7, the 800 a 7.8. I have hauled 16-18k pounds of bumper pull trailer plus 110 gal of fuel and a bed full of tools aprox. 700 miles, truck had plenty of motor, 6 speed auto tranny, 3.33 rear gears. The new fords have a built in engine brake that will come in handy. I will say this, while the 350 is more comfortable to ride in, the 800 gets better mileage and stops the load a lot better than the 350. I get 12.4 mpg loaded to 46k total weight with the f-800, at 1/2 that with the 350 I was getting 10...

    How would I do it? Single axle tractor, 7 speeds or more, w/ air brakes, and maybe an engine brake. Personally I'd go to a 20 ton tag trailer pulled with a single or tandem dump rather than a custom f-550 tractor.
     
  14. hougie

    hougie Well-Known Member

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    Steve i won't be pulling any real long grades in my area, atleast not very often but i see where your coming from. I like the idea of a single dump stumpjumper, Never really considered that. Tandem is not really an option as the insurance and registration is quite a bit to register for that much weight.
     
  15. millercross3

    millercross3 Well-Known Member

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    Also, anything with air brakes, gotta be licensed for that. The places you are going in and out of. Future other uses if you look at a 550, up keep and price of either single axe or other option. Like everything, to one up side with one is the down side of the other and vise versa. Good idea with the dump option stumpjumper...if you're not using the hoe...could always custom haul dirt, rock, snow, sand anything really. Good luck with a simple descision:tong hougie. Make sure you tell us what ya did.