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What to look for when buying used dozer.

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by stars&bars44, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. stars&bars44

    stars&bars44 Well-Known Member

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    Looking at buying a D9G later this week. Any quick checklist ya'll may use when you look at a tractor to purchase. I can handle some basic checks like blowby, bubbles in coolant, run a magnet in final drive oil...anybody got anything I should look out for in these big tractors?
     
  2. check

    check Senior Member

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    The very first place I look is the bushings. Undercarriage is where the big money is and even if it looks good at first glance, worn out bushings will tell you otherwise.
     
  3. Bluox

    Bluox Senior Member

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    Keep in mind these tractors will be 44 to 57 years old and used hard. Unless you have enough money to bar-b-que a drowned mule burning 100 dollar bills these tractors won't be a good buy.
    Bob
     
  4. Sanya_Promstal

    Sanya_Promstal Well-Known Member

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    Here correctly written, that you need to start inspection from the undercarriage. The cost of the new kit reaches 20% of the cost of the machine. This is the first. The second is to take a pressure gauge and measure the pressure at all control points of the hydraulic system. So you get information about the status of the valves and the sides of the controls, pumps (it is important to see how they are heated). View the rods of hydraulic cylinders. They should not be leaking oil and the rod should have a matte finish and a mirror surface. Be sure to try the machine at work. You will feel the state of the engine - the presence of black or blue smoke, the loss of speed is an occasion to think about. Be sure to check the inclusion of the gear. If they turn on badly or the course is not running, wear the planetary gearbox. Steering clutch and stopping brake in poor condition do not turn the bulldozer badly and disinhibit it badly. All this leads to the fact that the bulldozer starts to "skid". The machine must be warmed up. All measurements should be made with hot oil.
     
  5. Sanya_Promstal

    Sanya_Promstal Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, but buying such an ancient mammoth is nonsense
     
  6. stars&bars44

    stars&bars44 Well-Known Member

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    This tractor comes from a local guy, it's got tall rails, track pads are thick, and grouser bars are up. (Judging from pictures) I will check the wear and bushings. I know it's old iron, and could have many problems, but if you can find a tractor that's been run by the man paying to fix it, it's usually not torn up. This dozer looks to be one like that. If it does good it will pay for itself on a small clearing job we have. He has priced the tractor at 21k to me. That's a decent price compared to some of the others around I've seen online.
     
  7. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    You need to measure over 4 track links, 5 pins with track stretched to measure track wear. There are charts on the net to determine percentage of track life left. Or ask your dealer, they have the charts. Pads mean little. That being said I am not afraid of old iron, but then I just play. Many old machines suffer final drive issues when the pads are built up. I would rather spin than break. If it does your job, you will come out well, If it fails, you are out some dough. Are you experienced in operating and maintaining these older machines? They will eat the uneducated in items you did not know enough about to maintain. If you get it, buy a set of manuals and read them. They will be the cheapest thing you ever buy for it.
     
  8. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    What to look out for... that Zeigler Cat didn't work on the engine.
     
    stars&bars44 likes this.
  9. stars&bars44

    stars&bars44 Well-Known Member

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    Yes I had a D7f, D8h for several years. We have a D6D now. Came up on older iron. Never worked on a 9 though.
     
  10. catman13

    catman13 Senior Member

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    post a few pictures of the machine and rails and we can probably give you a little better info
     
  11. stars&bars44

    stars&bars44 Well-Known Member

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  12. stars&bars44

    stars&bars44 Well-Known Member

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    This what I found on the internet. Tracks look slack, and could use a little cat yellow paint but we will see. Hope to go put eyes on it next week.
     
  13. catman13

    catman13 Senior Member

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    doesn't look bad, like said earlier measure between 5 pins to see what wear there is. check for blow by from the oil fill tube, see how much hesitation there is when shifting the transmission from forward and reverse.
    look at the rollers on the bottom and see what shape they are in.
     
  14. Marsh Mutt

    Marsh Mutt Well-Known Member

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    This colorful observation got me as nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs, and that is more anxiety than you can shake a stick at.
     
  15. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

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    I was always told that big machines are worked hard and put away wet. Machines like that aren't making money unless that little flap on top of the exhaust is straight up, and the blade is full. Has this guy owned this machine since she was a pup, of did he buy it from a contractor that took the good out of her, and he has just been babying her along in her senior years. We bought a 7g from a mill. It had spent it's whole life in a sawdust pile. Just like new. After a year, the under carriage was done. The mill had refurbished it with aftermarket junk. The only cat parts were the pads. That said, if a 9g is as reliable as this 7 has been, go for it
     
  16. Bluox

    Bluox Senior Member

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    Here's a little reality check, call your local heavy hauler and get a price quote to haul that tractor you may have to break it down.
    Good luck
    Bob
     
  17. rondig

    rondig Senior Member

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    Old 9 is a lot of weight to do a little clean up lol....d6d is probably best bang for buck...9 has never been my fav....hard on fuel and slow..gotta keep blade full to make it worth while...
     
  18. oldirt

    oldirt Senior Member

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    this must be a joke..