1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Wanting to buy a skid loader

Discussion in 'Skid Steers' started by crane operator, Mar 30, 2019.

  1. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    5,278
    Location:
    sw missouri
    I've been kicking around a skid loader, will be getting wheels, not a track machine. I'm on rocky soil most of the time. Can be some crooked conditions.

    What I'm using the loader for is to set crane mats under crane outriggers. So really like a rough terrain forklift most of the time. The mats are going to be around 1,500- 2500 lbs. Wood and wood/ steel mats. I'm loading it on the trailer with the crane counterweights and mats, so a skid will do what I want. But I'm going to be carrying around 2,500 and repeatedly loading and unloading them off the trailer.

    I'm not as interested in cycle speed as I am in precise movement and lift capacity. Nothing very new either. Pre 2000 probably, I'm a simple mechanic.

    Grew up running Hydra mac's with dual hand controls. They are kind of scarce and hard to get parts for. Have been in bobcat, new holland, case, john deere. None of them for probably more than a hour.

    So, case 1845c? Everyone says they built like a boulder /reliable. I remember them being less than precise on controls and I was a little worried about lift capacity.

    Guy by me has a new holland lx875, not as fond of foot controls but I can probably make it work. I'm thinking with the more wheelbase it would probably be a little more stable with a load on.

    I don't know bobcat numbers at all once past the 773- 873 series. Again foot controls, I would prefer hand, but if someone has a recommendation I'm not married to any idea.

    I actually see some of the case 80-90 xt series from time to time, priced about like a 1845c. I think they are hand pilot control, but I know nothing reliability wise. I think the reason they are priced by me about like the 1845's is the reliability reputation of the 1845's.

    So throw me a little advice. I'm not spending more than $15,000. I'm not afraid of buying at auction and shipping either. And I don't mind a little work. Don't care about dealer support, I rarely go to a dealer for any of my cranes or trucks.

    What do I want? Thanks for all advice in advance.
     
    DMiller and hosspuller like this.
  2. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2014
    Messages:
    244
    Occupation:
    Instigator of Choas
    Location:
    Otsego, Mn
    I've got an 1845c and they are fantastic machines, but if I was moving 2500 lbs around, I'd want a bigger machine for sure.
    I just moved a 2200 lb Bridgeport machine with an S650. It's rated at 2690 lift. But the other thing to remember is the tip rating. Even though it could lift it no problem, it got very tippy at that weight. If you're working on rough terrain, it's going to be really slow going. This one place a track machine would be helpful, they general have a higher tip capacity compared to lift. Something to consider.

    As for hand or foot controls and all that. It's mostly comes down to what you've used in the past and what your used to. Bobcats are mostly foot controls. Case are mostly hand controls in some form. But I think machine size vs price is your biggest deciding factor here.
     
    Bumpsteer likes this.
  3. Metalman 55

    Metalman 55 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,231
    Location:
    Ontario
    We bought this old Cat 246 about 3 yrs ago with about 3,800 hrs on it & it has been great for a yard skidsteer that is used for knocking around the yard doing odd jobs. I think it is a yr 2002 ish & we paid $10,000 CDN for it. Has pilot controls & it maneuvers around excellent. No heated cab, but we are ok with that for the amount it is used.
     

    Attached Files:

    Vetech63 and DMiller like this.
  4. InsleyGuy

    InsleyGuy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    Howell, Mi
    As much as I like my 1845c, it will not handle 2500lbs.
     
  5. KSSS

    KSSS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    3,328
    Occupation:
    excavation
    Location:
    Idaho
    The 1800 series is the Gold Standard for dependability. There are no secrets with it, if you buy one and have issues, you can be 100 percent certain someone has an answer. I owned 6 1840's over the years and I liked that aspect of the machine. These were built prior to the safety switch craze that would come later, so combined with robust engineering (for the most part) and a Cummins motor. These are hard to beat for the home owner or occasional use contractor. The issues with them are they are loud, low on power (56 on the 1845C and 50 on the 1840), I hate the brake pin system, and yes the lift capacity ROC is 1750 on the 1845c and 1500 on the 1840 is on the low side.

    The XT and 400 series (much the same on the outside). These machines were created in the safety switch craze and those issues do come up, easy and cheap to fix, but frustrating when you cant move the machine because a light is the wrong color. Other than the Series 3 400 series (hyd. pilot controlled), these were mechanical servo controlled and really good at least in my opinion. Great feel, low effort and near zero issues with them mechanically. I have owned 85XT's (was not a fan, not enough hp for the weight at my elevation and it was not turboed), 95XT's, 70XT, 440, 465's. The XT's really set the bar at the time for capacity in a skid steer. Built when steel was cheap, super HD and with a Cummins engine they ran well. You could order a 90-95XT with a 5K psi hyd system. Pretty dang impressive for its time. I thought, while not perfect certainly (cabs are not great) these large loaders can lift a crazy amount of weight, and move incredible amounts of material. Put steel tracks on a 95XT/465 and you have a D3 that can load trucks. The biggest issue reliability wise is the 465 changed up their pump configuration for a short time, big mistake and it was corrected, but you don't want one of those. Other than that, most reliability issues revolve around safety sensors, I think that is still what all OEM's face today, especially as the machines age. Lastly the big XTs and 400 series weigh around 10K so you want to make sure you have enough trailer and pickup to pull them.

    I don't know what you want to do with the machine, but looking back, the best machine for its size was the 440 2200 pound ROC, two speed, more power to weight than anything on the market then and likely still, 4.5 liter Iveco is big and burly other than an exhaust note that irritated me, I always thought it was a better engine productivity wise than a 3.9T. They are light enough that they can be moved in tandem with other machines or a lighter pickup and trailer. If you need more loader than go 95XT/465. Like I said they are certainly capable and not expensive to keep moving.
     
  6. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
    Messages:
    3,181
    Occupation:
    Field Mechanic
    Location:
    Claremore, OK
    We have a mixture at work. Older Case, older 785 New Holland, never 885 New Holland, a TL 150 and 250 Takeuchi. I also wrench on a fleet of Cat’s for a friend. A couple on tires and a couple on tracks. I gotta say I really like the tracked machines having run and worked on both.

    Budget wise you’ll be into the older New Holland’s and Case. I know zip about Bobcat. Getting one on tires that will lift what you want will be a little bit of a challenge but there are some Cat’s and Bobcats that have the longer wheelbase that will help.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  7. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2015
    Messages:
    786
    Location:
    mn
    Your description is just screaming for a new holland superboom like an 885 with rear weights simple machines that won't even notice the weight With direct mechanical controls good feel and precision
     
    DMiller likes this.
  8. jacobd

    jacobd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2017
    Messages:
    115
    Location:
    North carolina
    I'm a diehard Case fanboy but for your application I would learn towards an older, larger New Holland. They tend to not be as powerful but you don't need as much power just to pick and carry. And the vertical lift and longer wheelbase make for a better forklift. Also I'm pretty sure pilot controls were an option on some models. I know I saw one at an auction that was 2000ish vintage with all hand pilot controls but I can't remember for the life of me what model it was. LS180 or 185?
     
  9. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2014
    Messages:
    244
    Occupation:
    Instigator of Choas
    Location:
    Otsego, Mn
    A Gehl 7600/7800 is about as close to an offroad forklift as you can get in a skid steer. Plenty of power and capacity.
     
  10. Tones

    Tones Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,769
    Occupation:
    Ex land clearing contractor, part-time retired
    Location:
    Ubique
    Acknowledging that you want tires not tracks the RC series 85 or 100 Positracks will bolt in lifting those weights and old school into the bargain.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  11. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    5,278
    Location:
    sw missouri
    Thanks for the advice so far guys. The skid steer primary use is to set 4'x8' steel and wood outrigger support mats for a 100 ton crane. Most guys set their mats with the crane on 1/2 outriggers, but I go a lot of places that I can't get level enough to use the crane until I'm up on mats. Hence the skid loader to set mats with.

    I will be hauling it on the same semi truck and trailer that I haul the counterweights and mats on. I should be able to have up to a 10,000lb machine or so and be under gross 80,000 lbs with all the other stuff on the trailer.

    It will never be terrible muddy, if its too muddy, I won't be able to get a 100,000lbs machine (the crane) in there anyways. Sometimes I'm out in the dirt/ rock, other times its in a shopping mall parking lot. My experience with tracks is that on pavement its a rough ride. And I really don't need the extra undercarriage wear issues, when I don't need the advantages that tracks have in poor ground conditions.

    I've run a tak and bobcat track machines, and yes they tend to be more stable. I was more impressed with the tak than the bobcat. I'm not totally opposed to the idea of a track machine, I just think that with what I want to spend and how I will use it, a track machine will be too expensive, both in upkeep and intial purchase price. For a more capable machine, but probably a capability I don't need.

    The only posi trak that I've run was a rc 30 or so, a real small one. Weight seemed real well distributed.

    Looks like the gehl 7800 is the same thing as a mustang 2109? This one isn't that far away from me: Mustang 2109 for $18,900

    https://stlouis.craigslist.org/hvd/d/wentzville-mustang-hp-cab-joysticks/6837489693.html
    mustang 2109.jpg

    Looks like they weigh just over 10,000, and over 100 hp. Probably more than I need. and going to take up a lot of real estate on the trailer.

    This one is a lot closer to me, a lx 885, and $11,500:

    https://springfield.craigslist.org/hvo/d/new-holland-lx885-turbo/6837631517.html

    new holland lx885.jpg

    So it will probably live most of its life with forks on it, will probably take the bucket with us on the trailer in case we have to level out some rock.

    Anyone have a set of pallet forks with the tooth positioner cylinders that run off the aux. ? If I'm buying a fork carriage, I think that's the route I'm going. I hate climbing in and out of a skid to move forklift teeth.

    Something like these:
    SlidingForks_02.jpg
     
    DMiller likes this.
  12. Justinj608

    Justinj608 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2019
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    One thing is for sure, what ever you do get I'm guessing your going to wonder how in the world you ever got along without one. Its probably all the uses that your not even planning on using it for that you will appreciate having it for. I had a landscape business and owned dozens of machines with a total of 6 skids at one time, a mix of Bobcats, Cats and one Takeuchi. Bobcats were all very dependable and simple for the new guys to start with, Cats were all MTL's for the low ground pressure in yards but expensive, both to buy and maintain. Although the dealer was great with everything. The Tak was literally used as a dozer and built like a tank, just a rough ride, best grading and lifting machine I ever ran. Now that I'm out of the business I kept a S185 and use it for everything, can't imagine ever not having a skid. Maybe give a S250 or S300 a look, I bet you could find one reasonable with moderate hours that would do the job. Good luck!
     
    check likes this.
  13. Metalman 55

    Metalman 55 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,231
    Location:
    Ontario
    I am sure the sliding forks option will be useful. We just purchased a side tilting set of forks for ours, but I have no picture of that. When you pick up a scrap bin sideways (we added some lifting tubes under it) so we can dump it sideways, right out the sloped part. The tilter goes up to 108 deg, but for emptying a bin like the one shown, you don't need to go nearly that far......maybe 120 deg I am thinking.

    See the other handy attachments we made for our skid steers………...
     

    Attached Files:

  14. ianjoub

    ianjoub Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2018
    Messages:
    579
    Location:
    Homosassa, FL USA
    I bought this one at RB auction. It is handy to have the hydraulic adjustment. I have not strength tested it yet. Most things I have picked up with it have not been very heavy. I use it on a CAT287.

    https://www.rbauction.com/MID-STATE?invId=10464075&id=ar&auction=ORLANDO-FL-2018101
     
  15. nycb

    nycb Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2019
    Messages:
    36
    Location:
    New York
    The New Holland machines have always impressed me, even though they used hand foot controls forever.

    They never made any major design changes, and the big farms around here run them around the clock and don't seem to have many issues with them, seems like they run them up over 3000 hours, change the tires and fluids when required, and then spray them off, send them to auction and go buy a new one.
     
    td25c likes this.
  16. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    5,251
    Location:
    indiana
    I think you would get along fine with the New Holland LX885 .

    We have the John Deere version of it (8875) . That was back when Deere was buying them from NH .

    Lift capacity 2,250 #

    Like mentioned up thread you can always add the rear weight kit for better stability .

    Talking about outrigger pads I thought this one was an interesting design mixing steel & wood .
    100_1550.JPG
     
    DMiller likes this.
  17. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2012
    Messages:
    4,142
    Occupation:
    Retired Cons't. Supt./Hospitals
    Location:
    Moose Lake, MN
    Forks sure are a pain to slide in and out. However if you have hydraulic adjustable forks you do have lines to hook and unhook every time you change attachments. All depends on how often you change. My forks never seemed to stay in the hold groves. I welded a chain hook on each side of my fork carriage and welded a 6" or so long chain to the top of each fork above the slide tube. I drop them on the hooks with the forks spread to maximum and no more sliding around. The hooks have come in handy many times for other uses. I have a 665 New Holland that is 15 years old that has been a great machine. Lift capacity is 1850 and it does lift that easily. One like that may be a little light for you.
     
  18. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Messages:
    5,278
    Location:
    sw missouri
    That's a awful heavy piece of plate on the top. I think I'm going to build some steel ones with wood "deck". I don't like steel to steel if I'm on any kind of a slope, they will slide if they get 1/2 a chance.

    The all wood ones just don't last over time. Steel is kind of expensive, but build it once and then done. I'm going to build them with both lift rings and forklift pockets. I've even got a mad scientist idea for one that can be angled up for on a slope, I need to build the prototype of that one yet.

    It will probably have forks on it 90% of the time.
     
  19. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    5,251
    Location:
    indiana
    Those were outrigger pads for a 5240 Grove .

    I was thinking about a scaled back version for a 100 ton unit .

    Totally agree with steel on steel on a slope . I don't care for that either .

    Not uncommon for us to send a skid loader & attachments ahead on a sketchy site to prep for crane work .

    Bucket, forks , backhoe & cribbing . Little guy makes it all happen :)

    Dig it out & set the pad level to start with .

    lake job 004[1].jpg
     
    Bumpsteer likes this.
  20. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    5,464
    Location:
    Canada
    Some skid steers like the older New Hollands and JD's you sit down too low in them. If you have a bucket on you can't see the cutting edge. Once you have a skid steer and realize all the things you can do with it you'll spend a lot of time in it. If want something real badass look for something like this. 3700lb. rated capacity but would probably lift 5000lb's. without even trying. Common machines for tree spades and built heavy duty. If you ever had to dig out the side of a hill for a crane or level an area it would make short work of it.

    https://www.machinerytrader.com/lis...ment/auction-results/28677591/1987-bobcat-975