1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!
  2. ALL NEW MEMBERS READ THIS FIRST!! Thank you for joining Heavy Equipment Forums! If you are new to forums we communicate with "Threads", please search our threads to see if your topic may have already been answered and if not then click "Post New Thread" in the appropriate forum. This will allow all of our members to see your question and give you the best chance to be answered. After you've made a number of posts you will graduate to Full Member status where you'll see a few more privileges. Following these guidelines will help make this the best resource for heavy equipment on the net. Thanks for joining us and I hope you enjoy your stay!!

Using skids on slopes mowing; max angles?

Discussion in 'Skid Steers' started by brynbaily, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. brynbaily

    brynbaily Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    94
    Occupation:
    Equipment Operator
    Location:
    N.E. Ohio
    I was wondering if anyone had any experience with skid steers on slopes mowing or working in general? We would like to replace our compact tractor with a tracked skid with brush mower to open up our options. Obvious concern would be how steep of angle is to steep for the machine. I would say most of the work would be 35-45 degrees or less.
     
  2. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Messages:
    1,014
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Michigan
    35-45 degrees is pretty steep for a skid (or compact track loader), but I suppose it could still be done... how big of an area are you trying to mow?
     
  3. BDFT

    BDFT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    265
    Location:
    Northwest BC
    45 degrees is a 1:1 slope. That's pretty steep for a skidsteer. I doubt it would tip over. More likely just keep sliding down the hill. I would be damned uncomfortable to run too. I have brushed pretty steep ground with my S185 with steel tracks over the tires and that's the big problem. Pretty hard to tip one over with the brushcutter of the ground.
     
  4. Deeretime

    Deeretime Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Messages:
    344
    Occupation:
    superintendent
    Location:
    High River Alberta
    I bet a skid has a better time sticking to a slope than a tractor. I have a ctl and a mower and it will stick in the ditches at home way better than our kubota tractor
     
  5. Digdeep

    Digdeep Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    704
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    18 degrees is a 3-1 slope or 33%. A SSL will not climb a 1:1 and that angle would most likely starve your oil pump in continuous use anyway. Read your operator's manual or call your local dealer. You can't in any way compare the stability or slope operating capability of a SSL to a CTL.
     
  6. brynbaily

    brynbaily Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    94
    Occupation:
    Equipment Operator
    Location:
    N.E. Ohio
    Well there are several places we would use it. One is a condo complex which is pretty small but has close to 45 deg angles around the edge of the property. Some of the others are mostly flat but wet in places where we have lost a wheeled skid already. All are under 3 acres.

    We have done a few grown over access roads around mountainous areas but they were previously cut with a dozer and the slopes weren't really bad as long as you stayed on the cut path. We had tried it with a 236 Cat in the fall and the machine ended sliding around in the wet leaves. Yes, sliding sideways down a hill sideways in a skid is damn uncomfortable! I wonder what the max angel for a CTL is on a dry hill side?

    What size CTL are you runnig? Our tractor is due to be replaced and if we can replace it with a CTL that would do the same work plus more we would be ahead of the game....I think...I say only about 10% of our jobs require a brush cutter. Obviously the skid will out perform the tractor loader wise hands down, so that would be a no brainier.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2010
  7. Digdeep

    Digdeep Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    704
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I didn't mean to come across as too harsh, but I was thinking about the safety factor. I think you may be better off looking at a CTL.
     
  8. brynbaily

    brynbaily Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    94
    Occupation:
    Equipment Operator
    Location:
    N.E. Ohio
    Even a 3-1 would be super uncomfortable. The one we tried was less then that. I'll have to get with a rep and see what the max angel without starving it would be. I'm not comparing the wheeled machine to a track machine. I'd just like to know if a CTL would out perform the tractor with a brush cutter. The slopes are what really bothers me. Speed really isn't an issue with the size of places we would be doing.
     
  9. 05rammer

    05rammer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    170
    Location:
    Missouri
    Sounds to me that you need a mower on a mini excavator to mow a hill that steep.
     
  10. Tigerotor77W

    Tigerotor77W Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Messages:
    1,014
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Michigan
    I don't think a skid on those slopes makes much sense at all. There's very few SSLs I can think of that'd be able to run an attachment while clawing up that steep of an angle.

    CTLs... I wouldn't run a CTL (or SSL) *across* a 45 degree slope. If the slope is short, you may be able to get away with running up/down it, but that also means a lot of turning at the top and bottom of the hill. As digdeep said, there's also an issue with oil starvation. Most manufacturers recommend avoiding prolonged operation at greater than a 2:1 slope (varies, of course, by manufacturer). Even if the machine seems planted going up and down, killing an engine probably isn't worth it.

    If you want to try it out, look at ASV and Deere machines. They tend to be have better weight distribution than Cat, Case, or Takeuchi (all of which are rear-heavy). If machine operation at slopes of greater than 45° are permitted, demo it and see how it feels in the seat of your pants. My personally, I'd be scared s#$(less.
     
  11. brynbaily

    brynbaily Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    94
    Occupation:
    Equipment Operator
    Location:
    N.E. Ohio
    Rep said they don't recommend more then 3:1 with the track machines. He said they will do more but the engine will starve for oil and smoke it. The newer series 3 machines have a redesigned pick-up and oiling system to help prevent that. With that said, I know what I'm looking at.
     
  12. Digdeep

    Digdeep Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    704
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Was he just speaking for his Case machines?