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tri axle fixed neck trailer manufacturers

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by Randy88, May 1, 2019.

  1. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    That reminds me when we had a couple " Frog Cops " trespassing on the farm to set up an electronic Deer so hunters would try to take a shot at it .

    Get the hell off our property and take your limp deer with you punk ass toads !

    [​IMG]


    :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2019
  2. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Scout pickup reminds me of one of those (hundreds) times I may have skirted the edge of that "rebel outlaw trucker" thing. :D

    A good customer needed me to go pick up a Navy landing craft from a nuclear power plant about 300 miles away in the mountains and bring it to the port of Georgetown. I had 2 tractors at the time, one with farm tags, one with regular. My truck with the apportioned tags was down, and when I called to get the "over-width, over-length, over-height" permit the lady said she couldn't issue it on a truck with farm tags. I thought fast and said I was bringing this 60 foot boat back so I could dig a pond on my farm and raise catfish, I was gonna use it to harvest them. :p
    She issued my permit and off we went.

    Came back and parked the loaded truck at my shop. Got up the next morning and realized my permit was from the plant to my place- not the port! We headed to Georgetown with my helper in the scout pickup and me a mile behind. He called me and said DOT was in their usual place, in the shade under the bridge, where they could cover the entrance to the paper mill and the port. He told me to go over the bridge and turn around so I would be coming the back way and beep my horn when I was coming down the bridge and he would take care of it. When I did, I drove across a T intersection about 50 feet behind the DOT car and the lady standing behind it never looked my way!

    He had walked up and started an in-depth conversation and then argument about what lights are required; then we he saw me drive in the gate, he just said: "Thanks, bye!" hopped back in the pickup and drove off!
     
    farmerlund, td25c and pushbroom like this.
  3. heymccall

    heymccall Senior Member

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    Damned D O T

     
    td25c likes this.
  4. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Extended neck, tri axle, 22.5 rubber. If you really don't want the long neck, you could cut it down. Would have to put something like a angled deck/ beavertail/ ramps on the rear. Maybe bolt some conveyor belting to the steel deck to keep from sliding around?

    If its built like most oilfield trailers, you would have to work at it to hurt it. Not breaking the bank at $14,000 either.

    https://tulsa.craigslist.org/hvo/d/hallett-97-nuttall-oilfield-trailer/6921418590.html

    oilfield trailer 1.jpg oilfield trailer 2.jpg oilfield trailer 3.jpg oilfield trailer 4.jpg
     
  5. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Ok guys, some more questions, since starting this tread I've looked at more junk trailers than I knew existed in my area, and also out of my area and priced both new and used.

    One of the largest debates I've come across is weather to go with fabricated main beams or milled main beams, and how much camber to put in the trailer beams or no camber at all?? If a trailer is rated at a certain tonnage, does it matter to anyone of you guys how the trailer is made? is T1 absolutely necessary for the added cost to fabricate the main beams, or do you guys think milled beams, meaning those H or I beams right out of the mill are fine to use, most are grade 50 steel and they either put a camber in them or use them flat.

    Next option is, two or four main beams on the trailer, myself I've only run trailers with two main beams and the side rails are just channel irons sides, but several makers out there will put four main beams and the side frames are actually two more identical beams that help reduce the sag or bow in the trailer when loaded.

    Fixed neck trailers, tag and those higher off the ground are generally not made with a camber in the beams, they use flat beams, some detach makers are again offering flat beams in their trailers as well, which shocked me when I started asking about it, it really cheapens the price considerably and takes some of the bounce or spring out of them when loaded is the reason they are using milled beams I'm told by those that like the four milled beam design along with the cost savings.

    The whole reason behind using fabricated beams is weight savings, you can use stronger metals that are lighter weight but will carry the same load? ok I get that whole idea, but its a lowboy, I'm over width, weight and usually over height anytime I'm loaded anyhow, so where does a thousand pounds save me in the long run and pay many thousand more upfront for the trailer in the first place, then once rust starts, it actually rusts out and is weakened faster due to less steel to start with?

    Anyone want to toss their two cents into the discussion as to how you'd view this topic?
     
  6. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    How about some out of the box thinking? A tri axle tilt deck? Came out of north liberty iowa by the sticker on the neck, but a paving outfit most likely, so no winter use, and the underside in the pictures looks pretty good. Low loading angle. Not breaking the bank at 14,500 either.

    It would turn short with those set ahead axles.


    https://joplin.craigslist.org/hvo/d/grove-talbert-equiptrl-tilt/6966458225.html

    triaxle trailer 1.jpg triaxle trailer 2.jpg
     
  7. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Thanks crane operator, I've checked into it, the cross members were shot so those are new and the new owner is calling me back on some specs on it this morning.
     
  8. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    Just a thought but look into hydralic tails used right now you can find a good one under 30 if you go hunting you can find one on triples with 22.5s on it

    Just start checking rental outfits there is one here local dumping a triple axle I think it's a 50 ton and if I remember right they were asking 35 grand for it not that it's cheap but it's not terribly expensive
     
  9. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Went to look at a sewer tank job today, and the plumbing excavator had this tri axle, tilt deck, trailer. Were hauling what looked like a 16-20,000lb excavator.

    There was no wet kit, so the cylinders under the trailer are just to slow down the tilt action.


    60,000 gvw

    20200210_125734.jpg 20200210_125753.jpg 20200210_125814.jpg 20200210_125802.jpg
     
  10. WRA

    WRA Member

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    I'm currently pulling a talbert 55 ton trailer, and on the first day I was with the company, my boss lifted the trailer all the way up with a 336 Cat on the deck to clear a rough construction entrance. My jaw dropped at first, but I have had to do it several times as well since then, things do feel a little tippy and you have to be easy with it.
     
  11. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Just got home from buying a used triple axle fixed neck deck over, have to go back in the next couple weeks to get it and bring it home. Then start the task of tearing it apart and doing a complete rebuild of it from end to end.

    Its not exactly what I wanted, but was close and in my price range.

    As they say, it will at least add one more trailer in an attempt to have what I need to move certain machines to certain area's in which a detach can't get to.
     
  12. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    How rough of shape was it in
     
  13. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Structurally it was fine, the only rust was surface rust where the paint was gone, nothing rusted through or even partially rusted through so a good sand blasting job will take care of that and get it ready for either a new paint job or hot dipping. The deck boards were beyond shot, many missing which is no big deal, they are all getting replaced anyhow.

    The brakes and drums were looking great from what I could see but we'll tear them apart to put new seals and check over the bearings anyhow and do a full inspection of the undercarriage at that time. Its spring suspension, which is what I wanted, so that's a huge plus, from what I saw, everything was there and in good shape and not even the hangers had rust on them or any holes, another plus. Its got a full set of outriggers on both sides, but I'll need to add something for over the axles, not sure yet what that will be or how to go about it.

    Now for the bad parts, the beaver tail is too short and far too steep, the ramps are heavy duty but also too short and too steep. It was decided a long time ago, hydraulic ramps were what was going to happen, so those things need to be done, I think we have a plan to be able to add onto the beaver tail and basically just put an extension in to change the angle and length of that, shouldn't be too hard to do, mostly time. The ramps will probably be a do over even though they are in great shape, its not really feasible to change what is on there now, far faster and easier to just take the similar pattern and build new from scratch. The lights and wiring are a complete do over, just rip it all out and start from scratch, about like any other trailer I've ever bought used so I was expecting it anyhow. Tires were tubeless, so at least we didn't have to junk the tires and the rims from day one, some of the tires will need to be new, but all in all, I'd say most are in good shape and usable. The rims were far newer than the trailer and without being in salt, I think from what I saw, I shouldn't have to buy new rims right off the bat.

    It needs far more tie down hooks, I think I counted three to a side is all. I don't think the outriggers had much use, they moved, were all there and all straight.

    Its an older trailer with dayton wheels, which for me is probably better, dayton's are easier to change and I have spares on hand at all times anyhow.

    There's bound to be some surprises once I get it home and torn apart, but its a used trailer I wasn't expecting it to be in new condition ready to use.

    To answer your question as to how rough it is, most would just take it home, put a few lights on it, patch the wires, slap a coat of paint on it as is, new deck boards and put it to use.
     
  14. bam1968

    bam1968 Senior Member

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    Glad you found a trailer. The first lowboy I bought didn't have a beavertail or ramps on it. It was previously owned by a rock quarry and I think they just backed up to a pile of gravel to load and unload it. So we added a beavertail and ramps to it. I don't know if this will work in your situation but one thing we did that I think turned out real well was when we built the beavertail we made it so tipping point was over the back axle. Basically the tracks rolled over the back tires as the machine came over on the trailer instead of tipping on the steel behind the back axle. Where we screwed up was on the ramps.... I didn't want to mess with hyd ramps so we built them so we could handle them fairly easy which was fine for awhile but as time went by they would get messed up and reinforced a few times to the point that they were all one person wanted to do to flip them over. Then it wasn't long until I traded it for a detach. Good luck on your project. Sounds fun.
     
  15. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    This trailer has heavy steel plates welded over the wheels, not my first choice but after I get it home, I'll determine if those will stay on or not, if they stay on, I won't gain anything in moving the hinge point farther ahead.

    Right now I'm thinking about welding pin holders near the center beams so I can have three or four inch diameter pins sticking up to help keep things from sliding as a machine hinges over to flop down on the deck. I'd also thought about having two pins per side and pin them through a H beam or large tube to create a trough to keep the tracks in line as I go up the beaver tail. Have several bushings welded into the trailer frame to allow different widths of machines to be guided up the beaver tail.

    I do plan to bolt down conveyor belting to the both the deck and also the beaver tail to give the tracks something to bite to in wet or cold weather, I'd done this before to a different trailer I had years ago and it didn't work too bad.
     
  16. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Glad you found a good trailer. I too prefer daytons on the side of the road, over changing a set of budds. How long did you end up getting? Getting kind of late in the winter for bringing home a project isn't it, or are you hoping to start on it after the crops are all in, to have it ready for fall?
     
  17. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    The deck length is about 33 feet long, give or take. As for being late in the spring, your absolutely right, but since I've been looking for a few years now, can't really be too fussy when something comes along.

    Right now I'm thinking it will sit till we have time this summer, at the moment I really don't even time to go get it, let alone do anything to it, but who knows, spring might be two months off yet..........or start in a week.

    It seems we always have projects sitting waiting their turn in line to be worked on, we might just as well add a trailer to the lineup.