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Tree clearing technique?

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by D6c10K, Sep 28, 2021.

  1. treemuncher

    treemuncher Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2006
    Messages:
    354
    Occupation:
    eatin' trees, poopin' chips
    Location:
    West TN
    Pionjar rock hammer (or Chinese YN27 on Ebay) and non explosive blasting grout. I cut out a nice fire pit in granite ledge at the camp in Maine with that stuff. Easy to shear off 10"-12" thick slabs with that method. Drill 1.5" holes in suggested pattern, mix grout with water, pour into holes and wait 6-12 hrs and everything is split with nearly 20,000 psi pressure on the rock. The grout is relatively cheap and fairly safe to handle.
    AP7101108.JPG
     
  2. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Electrician
    Location:
    Mount Tabor VT
    Maybe I'll explore that. I find these rocks are hard! A rotary hammer ruins a bit fast.
     
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  3. D6c10K

    D6c10K Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Iowa, USA
    I don't know if he's used it yet but my brother made a fan out of an old silage blower.
     
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  4. D6c10K

    D6c10K Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Iowa, USA
    I try to keep piles close to where I'm clearing but have found that it's better to put them either on top of a hill or down on low flat areas. Erosion is a big problem here and a burning a pile on a side hill can start a washout that can be difficult to get fixed.
     
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  5. gwhammy

    gwhammy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Messages:
    353
    Location:
    missouri
    I do my clearing with a loader. Usually clear all the small stuff and clean up then take big trees out. We like to burn as we go, you can keep bunching pile and almost have a complete burn. I have a 200 excavator to dig stumps and usually get them out and dig the hole a few feet deeper then roll the stump in upside down and bury it. With the hedge you should be able to really burn the piles. I've seen pile of them burn to nothing but ashes. Try and watch the amount of dirt you get pushing up piles. Dozers are terrible about putting as much dirt as trees in a pile. With the loader I roll the bunches before I get to the pile to get most of the dirt out of them. Those hedge are terrible to push sometimes they are so wooly.
     
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  6. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    2,038
    Location:
    iowa
    To help start a fire and keep it burning, tires are illegal, but in my state its legal to burn waste oil or any type of fuel in order to get the material to burn, its not allowed to basically use the material as a reason to burn the fuel.

    We've used about everything there is to get fires going, most of what we've used was given to me, as in vandalized vehicles and equipment fuel that was contaminated with something and nobody would take it, at one time we had a couple thousand gallons of waste junk to burn up and get rid of, most of the diesel was contaminated with acid and the gasoline with water or some chemicals, the waste oil, I really have no idea what was in it but the thing I've learned is this, if its free, you really don't want it. We've only used a 20lb lp tank and weed burner for decades now, one 20 lb tank will enough to burn 20 acres of green live timber, maybe even more if the weather cooperates.

    I usually tell people we're going to burn, if there is something you'd like to get rid of and doesn't contain steel or nails, bring it out and toss it on, after all its your fire use it to get rid of the stuff you don't want laying around, beyond that it really doesn't take much to get and keep a fire going.

    Dry dead material any idiot can burn, live green or water logged material needs to be handled, prepped and burned in a far different method than dry, different species of tree's need a different approach in order to get to burn, green willows four feet in diameter takes a far different approach than a foot diameter green oak tree or cedar, same goes for brush or anything else, humidity, wind speed, temps all play a huge role as well, along with the time of year, in the dead of winter when the tree's are drier, is much easier than the spring time when the sap is heading up into the tree and literally making the tree's wetter.

    Blowers and things might be needed in some areas and under some conditions to get stuff to burn, in my area I've never used or needed them, I personally think they are a waste of time and money, other areas and different conditions if I lived there, I might feel differently and use them. I know people around me use blowers, have for years and still get marginal results in burning green material. I've burned green stuff every day while it was raining if the mud wasn't too bad to deal with and no issues whatever getting all the stuff burned up.

    It gets down to experience, what your dealing with and the conditions your doing it in and how much is wanting to be spent to get the job done and the equipment you have to do it with. Every job is different, each takes a different approach to get the wanted end result, there is no such thing as a one size fits all, never has been never will be and 20 different people will do the exact same job 20 different ways to get it done, doesn't make one right and the other 19 wrong, as they say to each his own and if the job gets done to the person doing the hiring satisfaction, then it was done correctly.
     
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  7. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Electrician
    Location:
    Mount Tabor VT
    That 12' rock I had partially buried, I used an old half sheet of 1/4" plate as a fire back. Between it & the rock I placed 1/8 cord of cut & split white pine. Pine was wet, so I doused it with old gas drained from old tractors. First fire I got some breakage, but not what I hoped.
    Next burn, I placed the sheet steel other side of the rock. More breakage, but still not what I hoped.
    Third fire was the charm! It broke an end off the rock, maybe 1/3 total volume. I was then able to move it a bit & it started coming apart in big chunks. Roughly 11 tons total. I couldn't carry all the pieces in one load with my truck.
    About 1/2 cord of wood, 5 gallons of gasoline, 10 gallons of OLD home heating oil with water in it.
     
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  8. gwhammy

    gwhammy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Messages:
    353
    Location:
    missouri
    It's a lot easier to burn piles if the big trees are logged out. Most are oak with a mix of elms, maples and a few others. We've just found you have to keep pushing them up tight to keep them hot.

    I just dug a lake that was had lots of big random rocks in it. The biggest I loaded on a trailer for a friend to put at his driveway. It was 10.5 tons on the scales. 973 handled it fairly easy and we pulled it off rolling on pipes with a 6h.
     
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