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Transporting tubo equipped machines

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by CascadeScaper, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. sckingranch

    sckingranch New Member

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    they make turbo savers. they are like socks for the turbos.
     
  2. buckfever

    buckfever Senior Member

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    southwest pa
    My dad has use cover the exaust only in the cold weather because he was affraid that cold air could hit the hot exaust valve and bend it. Don't know if its true but I don't ge a choise.
     
  3. vtcntrctr

    vtcntrctr Member

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    vt
    way to drege up an old thread. although - I was going to do it anyways.

    I've been thinking about this, particularly the "no air flow" argument. I'm wondering if perhaps this all got started with the turbocharged 2 stroke detroits. on those engines I believe it would be possible for air to flow backwards through the turbo, into a cylinder with open exhaust valves, out the open intake opening and out of the engine, its possible that the turbo could spin freely and burn itself up.
     
  4. Shimmy1

    Shimmy1 Senior Member

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    Since the other one was revised, figured they both deserved some love. Especially since this reasoning is the best I've heard yet. Both ways. :naughty
     
  5. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . .

    As I mentioned on the other thread on this subject I have good reason to believe turbo damage can occur from transporting turboed equipment but it has little to do with the shaft spinning from the air pressure . . . I am satisfied that's a myth.

    Extract from a post by Iron Horse in 2008

    That is exactly right and, what I believe can happen is, with no oil pressure (particularly on rough or washboard roads metal to metal contact can occur.

    Probably more so with a worn turbo . . ."brinelling" or "fretting" are the terms used for this phenomenon.

    As I mentioned this would explain the regular turbo failures of equipment floated to a remote mine site over atrocious roads.

    So to sum up it is good practice and there are good reasons to cover the stacks during transport but wind milling turbos are not one of them.

    As I mentioned in that post this problem has been known for many years and, when transporting large turbos there was a procedure and hardware to centralise the rotating shaft assembly in the oil gap.

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
  6. still learn'n

    still learn'n Senior Member

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    Kansas
    If you are worried about it just get one of these! http://theoriginalturbosaver.com/ I always didn't like to see a duct taped exhaust pipe cant get all the glue and crud off and then looks cruddy.
     
  7. donkey doctor

    donkey doctor Senior Member

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    We always just slipped a plastic bag over the pipe and wrapped it with black tape. d.d.