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Trailer weights

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by Steve328, Feb 17, 2018.

  1. Steve328

    Steve328 Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Master electrician
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    I just don’t see how dot police can know tow ratings and gcwr from every vehicle. My truck only lists it’s gvw and axle weights and the same on the trailer.
     
  2. Tenwheeler

    Tenwheeler Senior Member

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    Location:
    Georgia
    Some DOT officers are smart. In the old days ( pre computer ) one stated you left early. No Sir. Well you are over weight and length so you cannot leave until 30 minutes after sunrise. You have traveled X amount of miles in X amount of time and the speed limit is 55. So either you left early and get a ticket for that or you get a speeding ticket that goes on your record. Which is it? Well yes I did leave early. He had a pencil and there was not much speeding with an old Mack over 120,000 pounds.
    Today they all have computers that do a whole lot of the thanking for them. If you ever meet one that has a computer, knows the rules and trucks you could be in trouble.
    Aside from all that I believe they have to go by posted weights on the vehicles. As long as you are not over combined GVWR rating, no axle is over its rating, the trailer does not have P rated tires lowering the axle rating to 7,000 Lbs you should be good. The actual weight on the tongue can be a gray area but I do not thank you can be required to disconnect a loaded trailer.
    Some do their job to protect and serve but other are just butts. You need to study the rules and hold your ground sometimes. fmcsa.gov educate your self. If one comes up with something that sounds off the wall ask them to show that to you. Know your business and mind your manors usually gets a green.
     
  3. Steve328

    Steve328 Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Master electrician
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    Rhode Island
    Thank you tenwheeler I’m sure I’ll learn some more once I take the class a license test. I started studying.
     
  4. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    and all rules are subject to the interpretation of the officer. clean trucks and tight chains are the some of the best dot headache prevention there is both are really noticeable when they are sub par. they can always find something to right a ticket for so for the love of god dont pi$$ them off. one driver i had pulled there string one day thats the only truck i know of that got put on scales outside a checkpoint it got so much worse that truck ended up with air leaks soap couldnt find and apparently all the brakes were out of adjustment.

    most of the time they give you the once over in about 5 minutes or less and if your lights and everything work they dont go to much farther unless you look way overweight or something
     
  5. Steve328

    Steve328 Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Master electrician
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    Rhode Island
    My truck and soon to be trailer are new and the chains will be to. But something about seeing a backhoe being towed with a smaller truck just stands out to me. I doubt I’ll need to go on the highway maybe a short distance if any. Just the cab on the machine makes it look bigger than it is.
     
  6. Steve328

    Steve328 Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Master electrician
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    Rhode Island
    Here’s the truck and backhoe this trailer isn’t road worthy.
     

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  7. Tenwheeler

    Tenwheeler Senior Member

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    That is nothing! Look at td25c's post in "How to load a machine without picking up the back of the truck". The 6100D, 4240, 680CK, or your hoe we haul around are nothing in comparison. As long as your axle weights and tie downs are proper you should be good.
    Good Luck and Cheers KIMG0738 (1).jpeg KIMG0884.jpeg
     
  8. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    It's a lot simpler then people are making it. Take the weight the trailer is rated for 26000- then minus what the trailer weights guessing about 7,000, that is what the trailer will haul. Then make sure your truck is capable of towing that, and the pin weight needed. The 5500 will handle that no problem. I've hauled 18,000lb mini ex on my gooseneck with 3500 srw, it tows fine. In many cases these goosenecks are incredibly overbuilt. Many of the 2-10ks are exactly the same as 3-10ks.

    DOT varies, but generally as long as you are under axle and tire weights, you're fine.

    One FYI 12k axles are very expensive to buy and maintain compared to 10k's. Depending on use, I would consider going to 3 10k's. Cheaper to buy, and would cost about same to maintain if you paid someone factoring extra labour for extra axle. But gives you a lot more capacity, and considering the 5500 will tow 30k, gives you more room if you need to haul something heavier.
     
  9. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Manufacturer's GTWR is if trailer, and load were on the scale without a truck. That means tongue jacked up on the scale. Dodge's GCWR is everything on the scale.
    If no GTWR on the trailer nameplate, figure the lesser of tire capacity, or axle capacity, plus tongue weight. That isn't saying the trailer frame can handle that much. Make very sure tongue, (hitch weight) doesn't exceed the trailer manufacturer's , or truck manufacturer's limit.
    Everybody has a different opinion, Do you register the truck for combined weight, or truck weight?
     
  10. Steve328

    Steve328 Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Master electrician
    Location:
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    The truck is registered just with its gvw. And the vin tag only has gvw and axle weights
     
  11. redneckracin

    redneckracin Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Civil Engineer
    Location:
    Western PA
    Your state may vary, but in PA You have a Truck Registration and you have to add a COMBO Registration on it. I had a combo on my 3500 SRW and my 4700 International.
     
  12. Georgia Iron

    Georgia Iron Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2012
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    559
    Occupation:
    Concrete building slab and grading contractor
    Location:
    Marietta, Georgia
    Here are my thoughts. I use a 10 ton goose neck trailer here and there. Often times when loaded heavy, I hear popping coming from the trailer. I use an F550 flat bed to pull it. It is easy to over load the goose neck ball. I broke almost every welded connection on the bed that holds the trailer ball, which is a piece of c channel and a plate. It was hard to notice until weight was on the trailer and it was inspected. This same piece of c channel holds the safety chains also.

    It is scary to think about that load coming loose at highway speeds. So keep an eye on it and when you hear popping and creaking beware of the signs of things breaking. I have also broken out a rear hitch receiver on the same truck with a bumper trailer. I have snapped a 10k military style pintle hook in half on that truck.

    I see most using an F700 style truck with a nice commerical pintle type trailer for that size machine.

    If you are going to use that type of rig, I would suggest beefing up the ball area on the bed. I dont believe I would be afraid of it. Just realize that you are pulling something that is much heavier than the truck and the center of gravity is sitting high above the tires. It rides different than a low boy and can wreck you easy.

    Take your time driving and get used to long stopping distances. Resist the urge to choke up on vehicles in front of you when you are moving in traffic. Myself I almost ate the rear end of a car starting off at a red light got up to 25 mph and they locked it down in front of me. I had 3 or 4 truck and trailer lengths spacing and I still almost ate the cars bumper, that happened not long ago and I feel that I drive extra careful. But it is always some ass coming to a complete stop in half the time you can.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2018
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