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Toro Dingo TX425 gas, engine replacement hydraulic fluid and tips

Discussion in 'Mini Skid Steers' started by PeterG, Dec 25, 2020.

  1. PeterG

    PeterG Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2015
    Messages:
    175
    Occupation:
    Landscape Construction, General Contractor
    Location:
    Seattle WA, United States
    I'm installing a new replacement Kohler gas engine in my 2005 Toro Dingo. I have the Toro Service manual pdf but it does not tell me to drain the hydraulic fluid out. Seems like something I should do. Anyone a Toro Dingo mechanic or have experience directly with this? I prefer not to drain it out if I don't have too. Also it says to cap plugs, but I plan on using yellow rubber plug inserts that you push in and twist. And suggestions or tips on the whole process?
     
  2. Zewnten

    Zewnten Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2018
    Messages:
    81
    Location:
    Earth
    It's easy enough if you're mechanically inclined. You'll need a few crows foot wrenches. Yes I drained the hydraulic oil to replace the engine as it was almost due anyways and made it easier. Support the arms when you do start working on the hydraulics
     
  3. PeterG

    PeterG Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2015
    Messages:
    175
    Occupation:
    Landscape Construction, General Contractor
    Location:
    Seattle WA, United States
    I did finish the replacement work. I did not drain the hydraulic fluid because it had less than 200 hours on it. However, I did install a new hydraulic filter, idler pulley, Muffler heat shield, new oil drain line, and re-painted the battery holder. Most of the replacement wasn't too bad. I had a pdf file of the parts diagram and the full service manual which is a pretty good step by step. I did have some issues with the following. I used yellow tapered plugs (push in and twist) for all the hydraulic lines. The plugs I had did not work well and constantly fell out. I ended up using plastic bags and zip ties. Plastic caps would have been best. A lot of the hydraulic fittings are over 1" in size and hard to access to get enough torque to loosen. The job isn't real hard, just a lot of steps to get out, and a lot of steps to put in. I also cleaned and inspected everything. Was going to clean out the fuel tank, but in the end, never did that. Dealer price would have been in the $6000-$7000 plus tax price and more with cleaning and extra parts install, but for me to purchase the engine and other parts was probably just under $3000.