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Tigercat yarder

Discussion in 'Forestry Equipment' started by Mike L, Jun 8, 2022.

  1. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    What advantage would this have over a Log Champ 550?
     
  2. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    On the Clyde draw works we are either in or out on the frictions, and control that "feel" with the torque converter, or work against the brake. They don't have the friction in partially.
    The friction is an internal cammed set of shoes operated by the air line though the shaft swivel here. Sorry for the screens, with those off you can see it better and also lose more body parts. There are a pair of air cans in there.

    IMG_20190905_144039.jpg
    The brakes are external bands shown here.
    IMG_20190905_144048.jpg
    The can on the left is the service brake ( foot pedal ), the big can on the right is the brake you set, and that little can below moves the dog shaft and sets the dog in the notches you see on the right side of the drum in the picture above. You let the load down into the dog to park it and pull the load up out of the dog to get going again.
    IMG_20190905_143952_1.jpg

    Just posting that to show the air frictions and the difference with how they are operated on those cranes. I was disabused of trying to use partial friction :D
     
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  3. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    Same principal but we apply graduated air to them. Generally, solid lock up is roughly 70-80# & higher. We slip em around 35-50#.
     
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  4. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    Standing skyline over running skyline.
    Hydraulic drums for more precision control for slacking a Hydraulic grapple carriage, ect.
     
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  5. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    So I take it that you have a treadle valve working the Wichita clutch.
     
  6. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    The 3 levers in the middle of the dash are haulback, skyline and mainline. If you push that lever forward it controls the Wichita or Eaton water brake. Farther forward you push it the more brake pressure it applies. If you pull the lever rearward it engages the frictions and just the same, farther you pull rearward the more air pressure it applies to the frictions.
    Screenshot_20220609-211318_Chrome.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    That is an expanding shoe friction design like the Skagit 737,739,98,199 and also the Thunderbird hoists.

    You can slip them but for your application you definitely do not want to.

     
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  8. AndrewM

    AndrewM Member

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    Take the $50,000 and use as a down payment on the $2M 10-year loan. Monthly payment is $9,451.

    Save on two choker setters (by using a grapple carriage) at $50k annual salary each, actually about $65k each when you added benies and unemployment, workmen’s comp, so $130k per year;
    Divide by 12 months = $10,833 per monthly savings.

    There’s your monthly payment.
     
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  9. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    Sounds great!

    Until you realize that late model hydraulic machines do not run 20000 hours, you still have to have guys on the ground to make the layout, still have to have guys on the ground to set chokers to reach behind the RMZ's or down below the bluffs et cetera. These are a great tool for a huge company that can spend the money on them to appease the kids working for the timber companies that think this is the future. I can assure you that you will never get away from having guys on the ground setting chokers.
    Oh, 20% down on $2m is $400k also, not $50k.

    But, what do I know about logging.

     
  10. AndrewM

    AndrewM Member

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    Always will be the Gyppo loggers operating with paid-for but beat-up equipment who don’t need to put out so many loads per day to meet their bills, and then the big guys with the new equipment who push hard to make the quota and their higher bills. Grapple yarding and guyless systems are not new, but also won’t work for every slope and all stands of timber thus the need still for choker setters and big towers. There is always a learning curve with new methods/equipment and training up people- equipment gets damaged, people will get hurt. I hope the above photos of the tipped over yarder didn't include any serious injury. As this is new equipment, I am guessing this was probably operator failure rather than equipment failure, pushing the bounds of maximum loads in a machine that’s more Yoader/Excaliner than a conventional yarder.
     
  11. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    I guess this old gyppo equipment of mine must not be too bad because we out produce those hydroswingy thingies about 2/1. As a matter of fact one of those tigercat 2 million dollar "investments" has been sitting on a setting that is 17 acres for 3 weeks now. 1 log at a time doesn't seem too effective to me oh then you gotta send somebody out there to pull drop line to pick up all the chunks that it breaks as it's grabbing stuff by the tops and breaking them out.

    Well, there is hope though....they moved their 071 in to finish the setting.

    Those glorified yoders would work great in a modified shovel unit but don't think that they're ever gonna replace towers with one.
     
  12. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    I will show this thread to Steve, I'm sure he will get a chuckle.
     
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  13. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    Those old yarders and such are amazing in how long they last and the beating that can happen just moving them from place to place. I wonder though if they have the same issues as old line cranes in finding capable operators who can both run and keep the things in adjustment.
     
  14. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    It is definitely tough to find a good yarder engineer but it is tough to find a good anybody these days. 15 open positions for 2 qualified bodies and 7 seat covers
     
  15. Plebeian

    Plebeian Senior Member

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    Caterpillar, Finning and Lantec put together a SY235 hydraulic swing yarder in 1979/180ish. 235 excavator base with Lantec peewee hydraulic winches.
    They saw the need to put in 2 guylines with swivel sheaths back then.

    NZ Cat SY235 swing yarder rebuild. (present day) 200hp 55 tonnes. 45 foot mast, 1300 foor of 3/4 wire main, 2600 ft 3/4 haulback, 1300ft 3/4 slackpulling drum Probably suitable for smaller, younger trees some places.
    https://www.facebook.com/NZLOGGER/p...2UrIklzbzIHztmXLnsY7_-_W6a10VFXOU&__tn__=EH-R
    https://issuu.com/nzlogger/docs/lg_20220405_60
     
  16. Tacodriver

    Tacodriver Well-Known Member

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    East Kootaneys
    None, less line pull, slower, weighs more, takes up more room on a skinny trail and i haven't seen a guyline winch yet so if your in a shitty spot hooking to stumps life is going to suck.
     
  17. Tacodriver

    Tacodriver Well-Known Member

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    From what I have seen running a motorized grapple on a harvestline "junk" when you are digging around grabbing logs the carriage takes a hell of a beating so add mechanics wages into keeping the thing running. Also they don't do low deflection settings at all tend to really tear up stuff.
     
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  18. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    @Tacodriver , you can't tell a guy anything about a yarder if he knows nothing about yarders.
    Tigercat makes nice equipment but that 180 is not a "yarder".
     
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  19. Tacodriver

    Tacodriver Well-Known Member

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    I seen someone on the book of faces compare it to a 071 and how it was better and had a good laugh. You need those guys in the bush learning never know if that one guy is going to make an awesome hooktender if he was never out in the rigging.
    Can throw a grapple carriage on any yarder if that's what the pointy heads at the mill think will work but you better have a machine spoon feeding it if you want the grapple to produce and survive.
    No running skyline yet so for grapple yarder guys they can't use a mechanical grapple that has no hydraulics, computers or engine to smash. Important things when you a grappling with poor deflection.
     
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  20. Hallback

    Hallback Senior Member

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    It's a neat tool for a modified shovel unit but ain't no all around yarder.
     
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