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Things done at Work

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by Tiny, Aug 25, 2010.

  1. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Tiny,

    Who nailed all those 2X4's togeather? I'm guessing that is a support structure for a storage tank while it's assembled? Also how do they get them out, toss in a match?
     
  2. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . . One of the fascinating things about this forum are the insights into how different tasks are done in different parts of the world.

    Lids on concrete tanks are always a pain but it would be interesting to know the reason (and see the numbers) for all the timber false work. Last big tank I saw built here (in about 1980) utilised relatively lightweight precast concrete beams supported by temporary steel columns and they poured the roof in sections recycling the form ply as they went

    We did a small 100,000 gallon slip form tank on a station and, having just assisted with building a concrete boat, I suggested doing the roof in ferro and it worked out pretty well.

    A South African bloke I knew reckoned there was an out-fit working out of Jo'burgh that had some patented system of filling the tank and pouring a lightweight lid supported by the water . . . as I say we all do things different.

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  3. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Guess I missed reading the explanation back on the 21st. Must be a real fun job to disassemble stick by stick. We had a boss years back who would probably want you to save the nails and straighten them out on you coffee break time!
     
  4. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    Every stick of that lumber go's thru the holes in the side . Nothing is reused . New lumber for every tank . Job boss said , Depending on tank size 7 to 10 days to get that false work down .
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  5. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    Meanwhile back at the yard . This new company I work for is taking over the old companies yard and shop so me and one of the other former guys have been haul stuff to the junkyard .

    The " recycling center " as they call it has been under construction and rebuild so they have been piling up the cars .

    My old boss was kinda stuck on using what ever he had on hand . New out fit see's old crap and wants it gone . So the 2 old 50's models trailers that were used for parts storage were ordered gone .

    When we got to the junkyard it took a while because the guy that the boss yakked at wasn't there and it just took some time to get it worked out . I had no idea they could stack cars up like they did but backing in beside the pile and taking chains off the load had me a bit nervous .
     

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  6. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    ...
     

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  7. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Makes you sick seeing cars and pickups that look better than yours going for scrap, doesn't it? :D
     
  8. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    Thanks Mr Mitch .....LMAO
     
  9. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Hey, I'm speaking from experience here.
    In other words, crying with you, not laughing at you. :D
     
  10. heavylift

    heavylift Senior Member

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    what's sad is all those 40's 50's & 60's models going to the crusher, then coming back from China or Japan as your future toaster.
     
  11. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Looks like a good place to pick up a flat tire or two.
     
  12. CM1995

    CM1995 Administrator

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    Just as a side note, when I take scrap in, it usually becomes cast iron pipe that is shipped all across the US.;)
     
  13. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    Its a love / hate thing when at the crusher . I would love to save a lot of those , Just hate to spend the money .
     
  14. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    Another trip today
     

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  15. still learn'n

    still learn'n Senior Member

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    Did I see right that is a fuel tank at the scrap yard that they are unloading off of your trailer? Jerry
     
  16. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    It was a used oil tank , just sucked dry from a reclaimer . Only requirement was a foot by a foot hole had to be in it
     
  17. still learn'n

    still learn'n Senior Member

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    Ok I just heard of people being turned away bcuz of gas of diesel tanks! Jerry
     
  18. Dualie

    Dualie Senior Member

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    I can say all the years of running into scrap yards i dont think i have ever gotten a flat tire from any of the local ones. and running in there with my boom truck i have been atleast 20,000Lbs over weight on two axles more than once
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
  19. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    When I was working for Wilkerson hauling scrap in to the yard I believe I have been the same as far as tires go but you stayed on the " path " and you would be OK . However a couple of time hauling crane weights to cranes on the back side of a yard I have had trouble .

    I think trying to figure out how much you have on is a art that I have never really figured out . I've had some scale tickets that the boss asked me lighten the next load up a bit when he saw it ...... But I'm old school when it comes to loading a truck , If there is open deck space You ain't loaded !!

    That's another subject . This boom truck and trailer weigh a bunch more than I am used too . It's been a challenge to keep it right .
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
  20. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Wow, the last two years I was in the trucking business my trucks hauled scrap from yard to yard, and from yard to steel mill. I would say each of my trucks averaged 2 flats a week. One thing is for sure, the driver made a massive difference. I have fired guys for getting too many flats, in scrap hauling and back when they hauled demo debris. Some guys would get 2 flats a day, I figured they were driving with their heads up their behinds and couldn't see what was on the ground in front of them.

    When I was young I was a foreman for a big trucking company. One of the contracts we had was to haul iron ore from the ship to the stockpiles inside the steel mill with tractors and dump trailers. We drove down a concrete road beside the scrap piles they unloaded from railcars. We had a man who walked the road all the time kicking scrap away. The magnet crane operators were supposed to sweep the road, but it was like pulling teeth to get them to do it. We had at least 10-15 flats in a 12 hr shift, and many nights it was over 20. My shift once changed 43 in 13 hrs.

    When that 5 yr contract ended, the mill manager's relative won the contract. My assistant went to work for them as foreman and he said the cranes swept the road religiously, and he only had 2 flats the first week!