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The famous Cat "Click Box"

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Nige, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    It is a regular event on HEF for someone to post a question regarding Cat machine electronics, Diagnostic Codes, etc. For a large number of the questions posted the answer(s) revolve around the famous Cat “Click Box”, otherwise known as the 4C-8195 Control Service Tool.

    This tool usually hooks up to the machine Diagnostic Connector, and by grounding different connections in the electronic system, transforms the electronic dashboard of a machine into a Diagnostic & Calibration screen.

    After talking to some of the other members I would like to take the opportunity to start to create a thread to pull together information about the Click Box, for example: -

    · How it is built, including a DIY version that you can make for yourself.
    · What it is designed to do.
    · How to use one.
    · Tricks, Tip, & Traps about using it.
    · Extracts from Service documentation for common models.

    Please note: This thread is NOT designed to be a place where you can post your questions relating to specific diagnostic procedures. Think of it instead as a library of information regarding using the Service Tool.

    Please post any diagnostic questions by starting a new thread in the appropriate forum for your machine. It may well be that a member will link to this thread when answering and that’s how it’s designed to work.
     
  2. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    I'm hoping now that other members will jump in here and post their contributions.
    I know for a fact that there is a lot of knowledge out there that can all add to this thread.
     
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  3. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    I'll give it a start with this Cat Instruction Sheet:
    Using the 4C-8195 Control Service Tool{0374, 0599, 0709, 7490}
     

    Attached Files:

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  4. Mark250

    Mark250 Senior Member

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    hi
    upload_2018-8-10_8-46-39.png
    upload_2018-8-10_8-47-27.png
     
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  5. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Certain track type loaders are unusual in that they don't require a Click Box - but that's only because it's already built into the machine wiring. The switches are located under the seat armrest, but they work exactly the same way as if the Service Tool was being hooked up to the Diagnostic Connector.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Here are the same instructions for medium-size track-type tractors D5 thru D8. the variants covered are from N to R depending on the model. Also covers the equivalent pipelayers.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Cmark

    Cmark Senior Member

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    And in case anyone was wondering how hard it actually is to make one, here's the inside of a real one.

    Clicker.jpg
     
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  8. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    Here is the actual service tool and a quick primer in its use.

     
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  9. Birken Vogt

    Birken Vogt Charter Member

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    If you guys need places to order the various connectors for this tool, post some more specific details and I can figure it out. Or even switches for that matter.
     
  10. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    Excellent idea for a thread Nige! Even with all my time on SIS I’ve never messed with this particular tool. I reckon I’ll build or buy one now just because :)
     
  11. excavator

    excavator Senior Member

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    Sometimes you just gotta have one because. :) I think it's a disease but if you have to have a disease I can't think of a better one.
     
  12. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    Exactly!
     
  13. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    And just to be clear, this thread was Nige's idea. He asked me a few days ago if somebody came up with a thread on this if we could make it a "sticky", and I told him that while I'm perfectly qualified to make threads stick, I'd be totally out of my depth trying to post anything about a click box. (To be honest, I didn't quite know what the thing was.) I asked if he could post something, and as you all can see, he took the ball and ran with it.

    Thanks, Nige!
     
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  14. Wytruckwrench

    Wytruckwrench Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Nige!
     
  15. JD955SC

    JD955SC Well-Known Member

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    A couple years ago we had an M model dozer that would only obey the clicker box, ET wouldn’t get it to calibrate.
     
  16. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    So following on from Mark’s post #4 above showing how a Click Box is constructed, here is a bit more explanation of how it works in an attempt to try to take some of the mystery out of it, because in truth it is not complicated.

    To understand it better you have to appreciate what is connected to the opposite side of the diagnostic connector at the CMS Module. The diagram below is an attempt to try to stitch together various different parts of a schematic to produce a simplified version of what the wiring looks like on a typical machine. Apologies in advance if it appears a bit of a lash-up but it was the best I could do without re-inventing the wheel.

    I have only shown one of the connectors from the Click Box because they all work the same way. As Mark showed in his illustration the original design of Click Box had a 4C-8196 Cable with two connectors (a 4-pin Deutsch DT male connector and a 4-pin male Sure Seal connector) that back in the day fitted pretty much every machine on the market. Today there is a more varied assortment of machine Service Tool connectors out there so if anyone is considering building their own box I would suggest take a good look at the Service Tool connector on the machine first.

    upload_2018-8-11_9-18-5.png

    The machine wiring shows Pin #4 on the Monitor Service Connector connected to machine frame ground, Pin #1 connected to Pin #23 (Service Switch) on the CMS Module via wire #290, and Pin #2 connected to Pin #33 on the CMS via wire #291. As far as I am aware the wire numbers 290 & 291 are common to all machines that use CMS whatever the model but I stand to be corrected on that.

    So quite simply Pins #23 & #33 on CMS work on a binary basis. Either each Pin sees open circuit (normal operation) or it sees ground when the appropriate switch is closed on the Click Box. The Service & Clear switches each ground one particular Pin on the CMS, the Mode Switch grounds both Service & Clear contacts at the same time. Depending on which switch, or combination of switches, are grounded the CMS will perform different actions. Simples…….
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2018
  17. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    The CMS has 12 possible modes of operation, of which seven are Service Modes. Not all Modes are available on all machines; the software installed on a particular machine determines the number of Modes that will be available. Each Mode appears as a number in the display area (2) of the main module. Use the Click Box to access each of the seven Service Modes starting from Normal Mode.
    upload_2018-8-11_15-19-12.png
    The CMS performs a self-test when power is first applied, entering Normal Mode (Mode 0) when the self-test is complete. Mode 0 is the only Mode that does not appear in the display area as a number.

    To enter any other Mode, ground the Service and Clear inputs (i.e. the Mode Switch) at the same time. This action will scroll the Mode Number sequentially on the display area of the main display module. Removing the ground causes the CMS to enter the mode that corresponds to the number appearing on the display area at that time. The following illustration is an example. Removing the ground when the number "- 1-" present on the readout will cause the CMS to enter Mode 1 - Harness Code Mode.
    upload_2018-8-11_15-19-28.png
    Probably the most important Modes for maintenance & repair are Service Mode -3- and Calibration Mode.
    Note: Service Mode is always Mode -3-, Calibration Mode can vary depending on the machine model. Generally for Track-Type Loaders Calibration Mode is Mode -5-, for Track-Type tractors it can be any one (or more) of Modes 5, 6, 7, or 8, depending on the particular model.
    Use the Click Box to access the various sub-Modes within the Calibration Mode. If any sub-Modes exist, the first one will automatically appear after releasing the Mode Switch on the Click Box when the number that corresponds to Calibration Mode for that machine appears on the display.
     
  18. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I think I mentioned in the video that you don't want to go into any of the other modes with out a book or someone who knows what they are doing. There is a lot of good stuff in there that doesn't take much of a misstep to create plenty of grief.
     
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  19. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Wise words John. Always get hold of the correct service documentation before starting and if in doubt ask..
     
  20. Mark250

    Mark250 Senior Member

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    Some of the early F series wheel loaders used an LCD CMS monitoring system
    The mode switch is not used. Instead the scroll switch is placed in the up position with key off, then the key is placed in the on position which places the monitoring system in to service mode
    The later F series wheel loader used the VFD CMS monitoring system this system had only 4 modes and mode 1 is the service mode

    upload_2018-8-13_8-1-21.png
    Mark