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Temp Bridge

Discussion in 'General Industry Questions' started by 631G, Jul 6, 2022.

  1. 631G

    631G Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone dealt with installing a temp bridge for loader traffic to shuffle equipment and materials across a creek that is not able to be piped temporarily? If you have what beam section did you recall using? I am looking at finding an old equipment trailer and pulling the axels out from underneath it, but thought that possibly buying the steel and decking with some crane mats might get the job done cheaper and faster.
     
  2. mowingman

    mowingman Senior Member

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    An old RR flatcar works great, if you can find one to buy. You only need the deck and frame, not the wheelsets or couplers. They can be found in various lengths. Check some of the larger scrapyards.
    Jeff
     
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  3. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Trailers are only 8' wide, and if you're using a flatbed, the beams are in a ways, and the outer portion isn't very strong. I'd prefer two trailers side by side, so the loader tires ran down between the main beams.

    The rail cars are great because they are wider and much stouter, but they are a lot heavier so it takes a lot bigger equipment to set them.

    I suppose you need to start with how long you need the "bridge" to be, and what the width/ weight is of the equipment is that you need to cross it with.

    I've installed a old semi trailer and the railroad cars for customers. Neither were temporary. Trailer was for a pasture access across a creek that kept washing out the culvert. Railroad bridge for a similar situation, they just wanted a lot more substantial bridge. Both set on poured abutments.
     
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  4. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    are you allowed to use cribbing to support the span? Wood cribbing to support wood beams and crane mats would be a halfway step between a tube and a bridge that spans the whole creek.
     
  5. redneckracin

    redneckracin Senior Member

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    Thats a very vague question. You need to find a prefab bridge that is designed or roll the dice and take advice on the internet. Don't forget about the abutments, setting a bridge on bare ground isn't going to hold up very long unless you have an exceptionally large contact area.
     
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  6. CM1995

    CM1995 Administrator

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    What kind of weight and span?
     
  7. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    I'll echo what redneck and CM said. Get the numbers for span, and the size of machine you want to run over it.
    I've been involved with temporary spans up to 88' long supporting a Manitowoc 3900 kitted out to 300,000 pounds. That required serious engineering :D
     
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  8. digger doug

    digger doug Senior Member

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  9. Camshawn

    Camshawn Senior Member

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    I saw on Craig’s list, the folding end containers ( used to ship odd and oversized loads) advertised for temp bridges in 20 and 40 foot lengths. Cam
     
  10. 631G

    631G Well-Known Member

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    My thought was to use an old low boy trailer but those have been hard to find locally. The RR car is a great idea but we’ve only got a Komatsu PC210 and a 135 to move things around with. I don’t think we’d have the needed muscle to do it with those machines. Not to mention I doubt my local scrap yard has a rail car.
    We may try landing a flat bed trailer with crane mats underneath to act as abutments.
     
  11. 631G

    631G Well-Known Member

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    Deere 624K wheel loader with a bucket of rock. Span is about 25ft.
     
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  12. 631G

    631G Well-Known Member

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    This is a great option because there aren’t any axles to remove and it’s already flat on the bottom.
     
  13. skyking1

    skyking1 Senior Member

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    that's about 45,000 with a heaped bucket. 10' wheelbase.
     
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  14. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    Rig mats, exactly what they are made for. 8’-9’ wide 20’ or 40’ long.
     
  15. CM1995

    CM1995 Administrator

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    Will they clear span 25' and support a 45K lb rolling load?
     
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  16. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Not even close. They are for setting a drill rig on top of soft ground and working on, when you have a nice bog under you. But definitely not for a clear span crossing.
     
  17. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    Depends on which ones there are different specs, but the heavier one's 2 would support that no problem. Looked into it a few years ago at my property to span a ditch, IIRC if you tied 3 of the heavy one's together 20' span was good for around 80,000lbs.
     
  18. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    I think you're confusing them with swamp mats. While rig mats are used for that purpose they are also used for spanning, hence why they are so heavy compared to swamp mats.
     
  19. redneckracin

    redneckracin Senior Member

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    Never seen nor would I recommend using a rig mat as a bridge. Rig mats are heavier than swap mats since a several million pound drilling rig can be set upon them not just a tracked piece of equipment. We used them while drilling gas wells to give the triples something to walk around on while they punched holes a couple thousand feet deep and for protecting the secondary containment. Even the name implies they are to be set upon.

    Use a prefab bridge for the weights and more importantly, the spans we are talking about.
     
  20. 631G

    631G Well-Known Member

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    Wanted to follow up with the forum on what we wound up installing for this work. We used 4EA W12x26 beams placed in pairs to span the creek and then decked it with steel road plates. We set the beams down on crane mats either side of the creek to create what I am going to call the beam seats so they wouldn't sink down under pressure. The road plates were welded to the beams and the plates also welded to one another to keep them together to prevent sliding. The plates being welded to the beams kept them from rotating side to side. This ended up working out very well. The bridge was very stable and let us get the pumps, materials and equipment across the creek. We finished the cased pipe crossing Saturday and will be taking everything down this week once we test out the line with the inspectors.