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some work pictures

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by TOM V, Mar 31, 2011.

  1. jjimbo

    jjimbo Active Member

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    Tom what size of puller rod are you using? I may have something you may like.
     
  2. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    30 Ton ram with 1 1/4"-7 B7 alloy rod.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2015
  3. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    A few shots from today.
    D6M-12.jpg D6M-10.jpg D6M-11.jpg D6M-13.jpg D6M-9.jpg
     
  4. truckdoctor

    truckdoctor Well-Known Member

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    That view of that dozer is a familiar one to me. I've done that repair many times on track skidders. They are awful on track frame bores and equalizer bar bores. I remember on one I had to make a new fill port for the pivot shaft oil because the sprocket ate in to the pivot shaft bore housing. Needless to say the boring bar was out for the pivot shaft bores as well. The same customer asked me to weld/bore the end bores on the equalizer bar for their 527 skidder because they were in a pinch. I did the repair and it held up without breaking which surprised me. It was the same style equalizer bar that you have pictured for that D6.
    I would like to ask you a question as well so I don't feel excluded. Do you have problems getting around with your service truck being a three axle with that long of a service body? A pipe line friend of mine and I have been discussing that and I wanted to know from someone who runs a big service truck for a living. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015
  5. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    Doctor, no problems getting around, I always seem to get where I need to be.
     
  6. Dickjr.

    Dickjr. Senior Member

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    Is that the 6M you fixed the blade on a few pages back? Its a nice looking machine , curious how many hours are on it as well. I have another question , I have been reading about the expander pin replacement system. Do you have any experience with these. They say it carries a 10 year warranty. If I don't trade backhoes I may do some pin and bushing work on the swing tower. It a 416C , they started to bushing the swing tower on the 2005 model 416 / 420 etc. I guess that's enough questions for now. Your work is interesting to me and others, its amazes me what different types of work you do.
     
  7. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    ****, yes that is the same D6 and it has around 6000 hours on it. As far as the 416c swing frame I would bore it to accept the later model bushings, I did a few Volvo EC55 swing frames where the early ones had no bushings, bored them out and pressed in the later s/n bushings.Good luck with your repair.
     
  8. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . .

    Tom V or others. I still can't get my head around how that darned pinned equaliser works . . . I think some one did explain it but I must have lost the plot.

    Briefly, as I see it, the centre distance has to alter as the frame oscillates from fully up to fully down, the widest dimension will be when the track frames are level and fully up or fully down would tend to draw the frame in toward the centre.

    Could you refresh this old blokes understanding of the geometry and how they compensate for what used to be the ends of equalizer free floating on the track frames.

    Cheers.
     
  9. Dickjr.

    Dickjr. Senior Member

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    Scrub , I think the equalizer bar does what the swing arms on the older D6C , D7E F and others . It pivots to help keep traction or equal traction on both tracks as well as help with ride quality and keeps the front from separating. I could be completely wrong but on track. Thanks Tom for the reply. I hate to borrow 50 grand or more to replace my backhoe when a 10 grand repair could run me 5 more years.
     
  10. tctractors

    tctractors Senior Member

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    Scrubby, I like the way you have managed to try to master the daft set up that CAT use on this E-Beam, the outer bearings need to slide on the pins in the track frame to cope with frame movement, to do this they need greasing etc about once a day the same as the centre pin, as this hardly ever gets done idiots like me get good coins to swap out these lumps of steel often, I don't even bother taking a snap of these jobs as its pointless as I have done so many, the centre pin location is nearly always knackered so it gets a few gobs of weld on it and a new pin stuffed home, its like CAT have sent me a Money Tree, High Drives I love them.

    tctractors
     
  11. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . tctractors

    Yes mate that's the part I can't get my head around. I will have to take some time out and crawl around one of those jiggers . . . they are few and far between in these parts.

    I keep living in hope that the lightbulb moment will hit me and it will all become clear . . . I originally imagined they must have some sort of an eccentric bearing in the ends of the beam that could rotate and compensate for the angle.

    On a similar light bulb moment (I may have mentioned this before) I was once woken up about midnight by an old bloke who had just realised why no matter how much he stiffened up the "C" frame of his Komatsu 65 it kept on cracking.

    I had been trying to explain to him for years how the hollow frame has to flex as the trunnions move up and down with the track frames . . . but he continued to add plates and stiffeners

    It was a cold night too but I stirred up the fire and we celebrated his enlightenment with a tot or two of rum.

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2015
  12. RayF

    RayF Senior Member

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    Scrub,there is a self aligning bearing in the ends of those bars and a big chunky seal to cap it off. If the grease is kept up to them we don't see much of them. I generally work on the tens and a few nines.The centres have what we call a compressed duck feather bearing which wears a bit. The frame bores are machined to a interference fit on the pin and the most common problem here is getting them out.If a 100 ton cylinder won't move it the mexican speed wrench comes out.
    If the dozer is on rock its not uncommon for the bar to break through the centre bore. Its an area Cat need to have a look at! Some weld them back up.Only works if their welding procedures are spot on. There are after market bars which have varying reputations and I have a mate who is milling them out of a solid lump of 4140. They seem to be going ok.
     
  13. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    Bucket repair.
    KGM-9.jpg KGM-8.jpg KGM-7.jpg KGM-6.jpg KGM-5.jpg
     
  14. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    A few more.
    KGM-4.jpg KGM-3.jpg KGM-2.jpg KGM-1.jpg
     
  15. RayF

    RayF Senior Member

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    Nice work Tom. Most look at a lip thats been torn out and run.
     
  16. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    Yes,superb work Tom.Do you use a plasma cutter to make such clean cuts or is it just your skill as a craftsman?Ron G
     
  17. nedly05

    nedly05 Senior Member

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    Nice job Tom! I always enjoy your bucket rebuild pics!
     
  18. ddigger

    ddigger Senior Member

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    Well Done!
     
  19. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Nice work on the repair Tom.

    That bucket don't look very old or worn. Looks like a case of poor welding quality on the manufacturer, from what the pictures show.
    It looks much better now after your work, and putting the teeth to the edge will help as well.
     
  20. TOM V

    TOM V Senior Member

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    Thanks for the compliment guys, Ron all the cuts were flame cut.